220v welder on 110v

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  1. #1
    i like fast food NegativeGeForce's Avatar
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    220v welder on 110v

    I know this thread isnt in the right place, but id like some fast feedback. Sorry.

    Ok. I bought a Clarke 220v welder (180en). The power cord that comes from the welder is cut and you need to wire it yourself first off. I know that I need a 220v outlet for it to work. I bought a 2000 watt amplifier that steps up from 110v to 220v-240v that uses a regular 3 prong socket. My mig welder need 22.5 amps to go through the amp and the wire, and everywhere I look ive seen 15 amp MAX connectors I can wire my welder with. I was wondering if this connector from weldingdepot.com would work and if anyone has tried this method of rigging a 220v mig welder.

    http://store.weldingdepot.com/cgi/weldingdepot/42A.html

  2. #2
    Impeller Head jt2ma71's Avatar
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    Your local hardware store should have that plug. But yes, that one should work. Just make sure it matches your existing outlet at home or wherever it's going to be used. Good luck.

  3. #3
    backpsi is my batsignal!!
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    NegativeGeForce
    you just can not do that.

    A simple look at ohms law using what you have.

    If you try to plug that sucker into a 110 outlet. You WILL pull breakers if you are lucky.

    But you might also melt a couple wires and cause the wires to combust just because of the shear amperage.

    DO NOT PLUG the 220V unit into a 110 outlet. You are asking for trouble if it even works.

  4. #4
    xsb00st
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    figgie you should read the first post again, hes using a 2000 watt voltage stepup amp(which translates to roughly 20amp draw at 110volts). And GeForce yes, that is exactly what I would use for a 20 amp connection, but you MUST remember that the wiring in your home MUST be adequate for 20 AMPS that roughly translates to 10 Gauge wire to be safe( 12 will probably start getting warm, and if your running 14....well lets just say definitely dont do that) at the average distance most household electrical wiring travels.

    Honestly and truly I would run new wire, this will ensure that your welder is getting a steady 220 volts, you will not have reliance on the voltage step up amp, and you will know that the chances of tripping a breaker(while your welding your intercooler piping) is eliminated in normal operating conditions. Also your electrical bill will prob be less as devices that operate at higher voltages are more efficient. In fact most homes have 3 wires entering the main breaker panel, 1 Neutral, 1 Hot 110v, and 1 Hot 110v(the 2 hots are split fequency, so they combine to a steady 220v).

    Good luck, and be safe, if you are not sure of what your doing, I highly recommend finding a qualified contractor or highly experienced buddy.

  5. #5
    backpsi is my batsignal!!
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    Originally posted by xsb00st
    figgie you should read the first post again, hes using a 2000 watt voltage stepup amp(which translates to roughly 20amp draw at 110volts). And GeForce yes, that is exactly what I would use for a 20 amp connection, but you MUST remember that the wiring in your home MUST be adequate for 20 AMPS that roughly translates to 10 Gauge wire to be safe( 12 will probably start getting warm, and if your running 14....well lets just say definitely dont do that) at the average distance most household electrical wiring travels.

    Honestly and truly I would run new wire, this will ensure that your welder is getting a steady 220 volts, you will not have reliance on the voltage step up amp, and you will know that the chances of tripping a breaker(while your welding your intercooler piping) is eliminated in normal operating conditions. Also your electrical bill will prob be less as devices that operate at higher voltages are more efficient. In fact most homes have 3 wires entering the main breaker panel, 1 Neutral, 1 Hot 110v, and 1 Hot 110v(the 2 hots are split fequency, so they combine to a steady 220v).

    Good luck, and be safe, if you are not sure of what your doing, I highly recommend finding a qualified contractor or highly experienced buddy.
    not for anything but it is going to take alot more than 20 amps to start the weld. Once it is in motion it will settle to less than that. That why one the fuse panel one needs a type D contact fuse. Slow open that way the initial burst don't trip the amp. i hope that convertor can handle that.

  6. #6
    i like fast food NegativeGeForce's Avatar
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    Im gonna try it but im gonna monitor the wire heat and if it gets warm im just gonna rewire my house.

  7. #7
    2/3 HP to the Paws Simba's Avatar
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    Be very careful doing stuff like this. You'd be a lot better off rigging up two separate 110 circuits into a single 220, else you run a very high risk of melting things if you run over 20 amps on a single 110 circuit.

    You can run 20 amps at 110 with the correct plug, breaker and wire, but chances are you're under spec on the wire.
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    SupraForums Member
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    Why don't you just put in the necessary 220V outlet??? At a minimum buy some cable and a breaker and go into the box - it won't cost you much at all.

  9. #9
    i like fast food NegativeGeForce's Avatar
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    Originally posted by turbotoy
    Why don't you just put in the necessary 220V outlet??? At a minimum buy some cable and a breaker and go into the box - it won't cost you much at all.
    cuz im l33t like that

  10. #10
    backpsi is my batsignal!!
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    Originally posted by NegativeGeForce
    cuz im l33t like that
    Well hopefully we won't hear about a house fire that was started when someone tried to rig a 220v welder to 110v in the news

  11. #11
    Turb0robb
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    Originally posted by Simba
    Be very careful doing stuff like this. You'd be a lot better off rigging up two separate 110 circuits into a single 220, else you run a very high risk of melting things if you run over 20 amps on a single 110 circuit.

    You can run 20 amps at 110 with the correct plug, breaker and wire, but chances are you're under spec on the wire.
    I do the 2 separate 110's when needed too...

  12. #12
    Boost is my drug! DigitalDUST's Avatar
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    You need a 220 V power output in your house.. if you dont, you will have to call an electrican and have him install one for you..

  13. #13
    greasemonkey williamb82's Avatar
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    if your breaker box has the open space, just install a 220v outlet. not hard at all. my brother is a sub contractor. is it a mig or a arc welder?
    william

  14. #14
    i like fast food NegativeGeForce's Avatar
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    Im using the 220v from my dryer. Im welding stuff in the kitchen . Im moving in 1 month there is no point to install a 220v outlet in my house. The lower settings for the mig welder will work fine with the 2000 watt amp, but the higher settings will blow the amp/welder most likely.

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