Inquiring about a first bike? Read this...

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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerebral_Kamikaze
    Looking to get a Suzuki GSX-R 600 for my first bike. Only type of non "car" that I've driven is a ATV. A Banshee and a Kawasaki xxx 400. But before I even leave the lot with the bike, I'm definetly going to the MSF course and that'll determine if I get it mainly. I don't want to go out and get one and then be screwed because I don't know how to handle the bike. But from what I hear the course is a good stepping stone towards getting a bike. I want one because 1.) I live in Florida and the summers coming 2.) They're good on gas 3.) Would be a good means of transportation. I've talked to a lot of peole from the Tampa, Lakeland, Orlando area that says a 600 is a great bike to start off with. I even had a few say that the 750 is even better because the 600 just feels to weak. Most of those guys though had a lot of road rashes too. I'm crazy but not stupid. But would the 600 still be in good range for learning in a few months?
    Personally i would start on a smaller bike like a 250 or along those lines...... 600cc is overkill especially if its a supersports like the gixxer.
    Either way, good luck with your choice

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  3. #52
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerebral_Kamikaze
    Looking to get a Suzuki GSX-R 600 for my first bike. Only type of non "car" that I've driven is a ATV. A Banshee and a Kawasaki xxx 400. But before I even leave the lot with the bike, I'm definetly going to the MSF course and that'll determine if I get it mainly. I don't want to go out and get one and then be screwed because I don't know how to handle the bike. But from what I hear the course is a good stepping stone towards getting a bike. I want one because 1.) I live in Florida and the summers coming 2.) They're good on gas 3.) Would be a good means of transportation. I've talked to a lot of peole from the Tampa, Lakeland, Orlando area that says a 600 is a great bike to start off with. I even had a few say that the 750 is even better because the 600 just feels to weak. Most of those guys though had a lot of road rashes too. I'm crazy but not stupid. But would the 600 still be in good range for learning in a few months?
    See this post for answer this your specific question. Same applies.

    As for what to start on, skim through this thead for lots of suggestions, lots of advice, and lots of knowledge from people who care whether or not you survive the next year of your life.

  4. #53
    Beast ***e, engaged. HiTTman's Avatar
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    well ive read through this whole thread and its very great information. well im planning on getting a bike, since the summer is coming and here in cali it last for 8 months. well i was thinking im a rookie, in every way. these msf classes are locally based? and does anyone have a site that most classes maybe found, because all im geting is track racing things. and ive been a fan of the r6 for the longest time but i know if i get that ill probably end up getting hurt and or destroying the bike, so i was wondering if you think the 2006 Kawasaki NinjaŽ 250R is a good rookie bike it has a msrp of $3,000. thank you very much in advance for any help you can give.

    -Elliot

  5. #54
    greedy capitalist Dresden's Avatar
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    The ninja 250 is an excellent beginner bike. Consider getting one used because A) you will drop it. B.) you will outgrow that bitch fast and there is no need to by new. C) it will be worth nothing if you try to sell it or trade it in. As far as MSF courses, you may want to check with big dealerships near your home for information. The Local H-D shop would be a good place to check as well.

    EDIT : oh, post picks of that chick in your avatar as well.
    Last edited by Dresden; 02-21-2006 at 07:32 AM.

  6. #55
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    ^ditto, HD dealers are top-notch in getting people into training courses. Kawasaki dealers, too, plus the kaw dealers usually offer rebates with the purchase of a bike.



    The Ninja 250 is an "iffy" starter bike. It shines in a few areas, but it's blemishes are far more substantial if applicable. The bike is cheap, light and super easy to manuever...on the other hand it's underpowered and very limited in performance, which makes highway running not that great an idea. It's weight also plays hell with in when you encounter large traffic. This bike is best suited for downtown commuting and neighborhood putting where manueverabillity is key and speeds are generally kept under 40mph.



    Another bike you might consider in the 250 class is the Comet 250. It's my preference by engine along (v-twin), cheap, vastly superior suspension and a little heavier. I personally think they look better than the retrosupersport-esque Ninja, too.

    Now, I think that if you're looking at doing more highway and higher speed commuting, and are thinking about a long-term ride, then you may want to step up to the 500cc class. The two biggest bikes I advocate here are the Ninja 500R and the Suzuki GS500.




    The GS and EX are both superb beginner bikes, touring bikes and are both extremely sturdy and reliable. The EX has the upper hand of the two in power delivery and out-of-the-box handling, while the GS is sturdier, less expensive and has a vastly superior aftermarket. Of these I've always gone with the EX because of the power output, but I prefer riding the GS.

    Now, if you're considering purchasing a new bike, two other models I've been advocating lately are Suzuki's SV650 and Kawasaki's Ninja 650.




    Neither of these bikes are what I'd call "good starters" but they're both good bikes. The SV has a reputation unparalleled in it's class and is, straight up, one of the best bikes a person can own. The 650R is on the same track. These bike's roles in performance on all fields are almost exact opposites as with the EX500 and GS500. The SV is proven, reliable, sturdy while the Ninja is new and already falling just a hair short of the SV on the playing field.

    Now, if you're in it just to learn how to ride right now, might I suggest the Ultimate starter bike?



    The Buell Blast. Designed from the ground up to be a starter bike and nothing more. You can find them used for $1500 in excellent shape, and sell them after they've fufilled their purpose for the same amount. Bare in mind what the Blast was designed for...it does nothing else.

  7. #56
    SupraForums Member Stoops417's Avatar
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    I need a new bike reccomendation. Ive been riding my EX250 for 4 months now, i've done the MSF course and its not so much that i want to move to a bigger bike as i want something.... a little more comfortable. I love going through the twisties and cruisers just arent my thing. I'm about 5'6 and 165lbs so i have kinda short legs and short arms. My 250R is just right for my legs but i'm always scrunching my shoulders when i'm leaning forward on the bars.

    I've always liked Standards like the Ducati Monsters (still too expensive for me though)

    Would something like an SV 650 fit better you think?

  8. #57
    2JZUL8R JZA75 & JZA80 Nick Stonawski's Avatar
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    well eventhough i lost my best friend Mike last June in a motorcycle accident, the need to get on a bike like he and i discussed is naggin at me lately. i REALLY want to feel what he and so many others were talking about. i have had my fun with the supra and all and just want to feel some other kind of rush. i take my driving VERY seriously (no tickets or accidents after 8 years of driving) and understand the risks i will take getting on a bike.

    sadly though, my stupidty of looking "cool" on a bike and all cause i live in sunny southern california, i would prefer to sit on something somewhat sporty looking.

    after going through this thread and seeing the options of a "beginner bike" with a decent price tag and sporty looks, the FZ600 with the dual headlights seems to have caught my eye, as well as the Ninja.

    Other bikes i liked the style of and would hope are ok beginner bikes:
    GSXR750 (1990-1992)
    yzr500


    and the bikes i would prefer:
    Kawasaki Zx6
    99+ Yamaha R6


    dont know if my build makes a diffrence but im 6ft 210lbs


    anything that looks somewhat sporty is what im after and if that means adding a bunch of "ricer stuff" liek body kits and all to make it loook that way then a site with some cool stuff like that would be awesome!





    very helpful thread.


    thanx Makenzie

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  9. #58
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoops417
    Would something like an SV 650 fit better you think?
    Experience on a street-riden 250, successfully completed the MSF course and like Standards? The SV sounds wonderful for you! Keep in mind, though, that the SV is more of a Sport rather than a Standard. It's hard to really find any full size Standard class bikes anymore...pretty well limited to European models.


    Quote Originally Posted by SupraNikolai
    after going through this thread and seeing the options of a "beginner bike" with a decent price tag and sporty looks, the FZ600 with the dual headlights seems to have caught my eye, as well as the Ninja.

    Other bikes i liked the style of and would hope are ok beginner bikes:
    GSXR750 (1990-1992)
    yzr500

    and the bikes i would prefer:
    Kawasaki Zx6
    99+ Yamaha R6

    dont know if my build makes a diffrence but im 6ft 210lbs
    Let me start here by saying that you're weight is moot. Take this into consideration:

    1996 ZX6R, in stock trim, puts down roughly 92rwhp and weighs 438lbs wet.

    I weigh in at 150lbs...that'd put me at 6.4lbs per hp.
    At 210lbs...you're at 7lbs per hp.
    At 420lbs...9.3lbs per hp...that's twice your weight and still running 11's easily.

    AS for bikes...the 80's era FZ00 is a wonderful bike and was my first true sport. They're reliable, fast, light, nimble and there's enough aftermarket gadgetry floating around out there to make her competitive with modern bikes. Mine was 20hp shy of gen 1 R6's and was had a superior suspension...made it VERY competitive...and it was only $700. Cheap and abundant and a great bike...and a stock one is a great beginner bike. Be preared to learn how to work on carburetors and ignition systems, though...not tough or difficul to learn though.

    Steer away from the GSXR's...even the early 750 is too powerful for a beginner and the bikes are pigs...heavy. There's much better options and you'll be happier going with something cheaper, lighter and less costly to repair.

    YZR500...first, not available in the States. Second, a 2-stroke 499cc V4 homologation production bike is the last thing any inexperienced rider needs. The RZ500's (which is likely what you're thinking of) 430lbs and 90~ish rwhp put it pretty close to most modern sports I would suggest to noobs.

    The Zx6E isn't a bad choice of bike...stick to 1992~1996 models. I don't really feel they're a good choice for a beginner, either, though. They're a little less powerful that the GSXR's, but they're still about up 20 from what I feel a good beginner bike should have and they're fully faired...open invitation for costly repairs. Stay away from ZX6R's.

    No to the R6. Too light and too powerful for an inexperienced street rider.

    I really don't think you should be going at this from an asthetic standpoint. Your first bike is likely to be the one you do the most damage to. A new rider's best chance at survving his first season is ALWAYS to go cheap, buy old, learn the sport, then move up. Starting on a supersport doesn't mean the odds are wrong, just that you've beat them.

    There are actually three models out right now, though, that I have no problem suggesting to the new guys who want something nifty looking and faired...I'm shor tof time so you'll have to sift through this thread to get the info on them (I've already spoken of them all)

    GS500F
    Ninja 650R
    Comet 650R

  10. #59
    Damn Spaniards GTR-33's Avatar
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    So I probably shouldn't start on a GSX1300R huh? I was thinking of eventually getting one in a couple years (not as a first bike) and I was just wondering what the general thoughts on this bike are. I like it because I am a bigger guy and it is a bigger bike but I don't want to kill my self and don't know if I really want a bike that fast.

  11. #60
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    If you're a bigger guy the Hayabusa is actually not a good choice (for an experienced rider) simply because of the fact that it is NOT a bigger bike. Never confuse displacement with size.

    If you're a bigger fellow then I suggest looking at the Bandit 600 to start on. Right now they're cheap and numerous. The riding position is very suited to a larger person and it's a stupendous beginner bike. I'd suggest running with that for a season or two, then looking for a supersport.

  12. #61
    Damn Spaniards GTR-33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makenzie71
    If you're a bigger guy the Hayabusa is actually not a good choice (for an experienced rider) simply because of the fact that it is NOT a bigger bike. Never confuse displacement with size.

    If you're a bigger fellow then I suggest looking at the Bandit 600 to start on. Right now they're cheap and numerous. The riding position is very suited to a larger person and it's a stupendous beginner bike. I'd suggest running with that for a season or two, then looking for a supersport.
    Thanks for the heads up. As for the Hayabusa, I thought it was bigger just because it felt a little bigger, not because of the engine displacement. I don't know, I thought it felt more heavy/bigger than a say a GSXR 600. Is it really a poor choice in bike and what should I look for in a Supersport for a bigger guy? By bigger I mean 6'3" 240lbs. Thanks for all the advice man. Are you a bike dealer or something or just a very knowledgeable rider?

  13. #62
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    Well the bike is heavier than a 600...and fatter than the modern ones...but At 6'2" I'm cramped up on it. The bike was made for short, skinny people.I think that if you spent a couple hours on one, after you've gained the propper experience to handle that variety of power, you'd realize what I mean.

    As a beginner, I think you should focus on naked bikes with up-right seating. I'll always suggest buying an older, used bike and I feel that fairings are the last thing a noob needs. The first bike you own is very likely to be the one you destroy. 75% of your riding life's mistakes will be made during the first two seasons on a bike. Pick responsibly.

    I'm just a rider.

  14. #63
    SupraForums Member Duds's Avatar
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    what do you guys think of an suzuki sv650 for a first bike, too much? Something similar looking you can suggest if so, I really like yamahas, owned a superjet and a couple waverunners, does yamaha carry anything good for a first time rider similar looking to the sv?
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  15. #64
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    No Yamaha doesn't really have much I would consider a good beginner sportbike.

    The SV650 is a great choice...a little more power than I would consider ideal for a beginner but it's tame enough. What's more is that the aftermarket for them is so vast that you can spend a few seasons upgrading the bike to suit your skill. Once you finally step foot onto a supersport you'll be well prepared.

    This is a very appealing bike to me:



    It's the Hyosung GT650R. It's essentially an SV650 knock-off but it has an abundance of features that the SV doesn't have...like 41mm inverted forks, adjustable rearsets and full fairing from the factory to start. Also, SV650 exhausts and engines and goodies all bolt in place so finding parts isn't an issue. The GTR pictured above can usually be had out the door for what the naked SV650 runs on the floor.

  16. #65
    SupraForums Member 94Snake's Avatar
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    makenzie71

    Do you know of any good sites and/or forums dedicated to the SV650? As much as I love/want a 600cc sportbike, id be better off for now on a SV. Plus the SV is a good bit cheaper ($$$) than a Gixxer, R6, etc.
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  17. #66
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    The only decent SV oriented site out there is http://forum.svrider.com/ but a great source for general conversation is www.supersportbike.org. Another site to hit up is www.tlplanet.com or www.tlzone.net as many of those riders stepped from the TL to an SV1k and a great deal of them are SV650 weekend racers.

    The SV is a great bike to own. If it interested you, then you might also check out the Hyosung GT650R. A lot of people want to start on something supersport-esque and the GT650R is a great compramise between the beginner benefits of the SV and the SS styling of the GSXR.

  18. #67
    Damn Spaniards GTR-33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makenzie71
    As a beginner, I think you should focus on naked bikes with up-right seating. I'll always suggest buying an older, used bike and I feel that fairings are the last thing a noob needs. The first bike you own is very likely to be the one you destroy. 75% of your riding life's mistakes will be made during the first two seasons on a bike. Pick responsibly.

    I'm just a rider.
    Oh I meant for the future as far as sport bikes are concerned. My first bike is going to be naked. I like how the full fairings look, but they are the last things I want to destroy. I have seen how easily they are damaged and how expensive they can be replace. I definitly don't want a bike with probably more than 50RWHP for a starter. I was just looking for what I should look for in the future. A bunch of my friends ride and have different versions of what pretty much seem like the same bikes. Two guys I know have ZX10Rs, R6, an R1 a GSXR750, a mid 90s GSXR1100, CBR954, and one kid is on a black Ducati 749. I thought all Ducatis were red... Well they all say they own the best bike out there, well except the guy on the 1100.

  19. #68
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    Well as far as moving up to something else...if you want something "different" then you're in for a very limited selection, unless your wallet bearings are rather well kept. I just recently went over this very topic witha friend of mine...he's been off a bike for a while and he's looking to get back. He used to ride a 2004 GSXR 1000 and is looking at either a new 1000 or going for something "different".

    Now, when it gomes down to it, different is often not the best. The words "I should have gotten a" have never been heard by my ears spoken by an expereinced rider who owns a modern GSXR 1000. Those very words cross the lips of all my CBR, Ninja and YZF riding acquaintances with frequency.

    I, personally, prefer different. I like it. It means that I'll be one fo a "select" few...it almost makes me feel like I'm better than everyone else. Like I have balls of steel (performance is irrellevent when impervious to damage). My list of "next rides" consists of, but is not limited to:

    K6 SV1000S
    RSV Mille
    XB12R
    Triumph 675
    Ducati 996
    Another TL1000
    GSXR 1000 (one must compare "balls of steel" with "balls of perfection" on occasion)

    My friend believes at the moment he will be pursuing an Aprilia NERA.

  20. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by makenzie71
    No Yamaha doesn't really have much I would consider a good beginner sportbike.

    The SV650 is a great choice...a little more power than I would consider ideal for a beginner but it's tame enough. What's more is that the aftermarket for them is so vast that you can spend a few seasons upgrading the bike to suit your skill. Once you finally step foot onto a supersport you'll be well prepared.

    This is a very appealing bike to me:



    It's the Hyosung GT650R. It's essentially an SV650 knock-off but it has an abundance of features that the SV doesn't have...like 41mm inverted forks, adjustable rearsets and full fairing from the factory to start. Also, SV650 exhausts and engines and goodies all bolt in place so finding parts isn't an issue. The GTR pictured above can usually be had out the door for what the naked SV650 runs on the floor.
    Can these be found used, and if they can where can I find 'em? I've been searching around for a bike on Craigslist and cycletrader.com, but I have never seen these on there used. I've been specifically looking for a used CBR 600 F4i or Ninja 500, but after reading about the GTR it looks pretty appealing. Thanks in advance.

  21. #70
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    I'm really not too sure...I've seen a couple of them used but it's simply been an odd rarity over the last couple years. So few are here to be sold. I wouldn't simply go for a new one considering the price...if you're looking for used, go old and simple.

  22. #71
    on vacation makenzie71's Avatar
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    Where's "ATX"?

  23. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by makenzie71
    Where's "ATX"?
    Austin, TX

  24. #73
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  25. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerebral_Kamikaze
    Looking to get a Suzuki GSX-R 600 for my first bike. Only type of non "car" that I've driven is a ATV. A Banshee and a Kawasaki xxx 400. But before I even leave the lot with the bike, I'm definetly going to the MSF course and that'll determine if I get it mainly. I don't want to go out and get one and then be screwed because I don't know how to handle the bike. But from what I hear the course is a good stepping stone towards getting a bike. I want one because 1.) I live in Florida and the summers coming 2.) They're good on gas 3.) Would be a good means of transportation. I've talked to a lot of peole from the Tampa, Lakeland, Orlando area that says a 600 is a great bike to start off with. I even had a few say that the 750 is even better because the 600 just feels to weak. Most of those guys though had a lot of road rashes too. I'm crazy but not stupid. But would the 600 still be in good range for learning in a few months?
    I would strongly recommend against getting one of those bikes for a first bike. Despite what many people say, 600cc sport bikes are terrible terrible first bikes. If you decide to go this route, wear ALL your gear all the time, and get full coverage insurance. You will drop it for sure, and you don't want to have a smashed up bike without insurance.

    My roomate has been riding a kawi 250 KLR for 2 years. 3 weeks ago he picked up a 2003 R6. He has patiently tried to get experience before he go into one of these bikes, and I commend him for it......but, right now he is in the hospital with 22 pins holding together his leg and a rod in his back along with a broken collar bone and 2 broken fingers. He has gone through multiple surguries and after all this, he seems like a changed person (mentally scarred).
    He was going between 60-90mph when he gave a little too much throttle in a turn. He started to lose traction, and after letting up on the throttle he highsided into a guardrail and eventually hit a tree off the side of the road.

    Lately I have been really trying to spread the wisdom because I hate to see my roomate in this condition. He is lucky he isnt dead, but now hes going to have to deal with these injuries for the rest of his life. He was inquiring about insurance, but was a few days late. He now owes close to $350,000 in medical expenses, and $6,000 on the bike.

    This is a perfect example of why not to get a powerful sportbike for a first bike. Get insurance! and wear your gear!!I just thought I would chime in because I would hate for this to happen to anyone else.

  26. #75
    That quiet guy
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    Pretty soon both me and my mother are gonna go check out bikes. We're taking a motorcycle safety course and I wanted something sporty. I read all the recommendations and I'm figuring the EX500 is my best bet. I just want to know if either the EX or the GS can handle both a highway ride and an S-Curve because to get to my best friend's and my girlfriend's (who I will probably be riding to/from/with the most) houses involve going across a short stretch of highway then backroads through a couple twisties and an S-curve. That and it's a 15-20 minute drive (i've made it in 7-10 in a car before) so I want somethin comfortable.

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