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Ferrari's longest running series is also their most spectacular. Names like Testa Rossa, Spyder California, SWB and GTO have always been at the forefront of Ferrari discussion, so we decided to find the other 250 GTs.

Since the Colombo V12 powered the 250 series for so long, a good number of showcars, customer specials and new bodies were built. Today we focus in on the least known of these, some you probably have never seen before:

Source: Supercars.net

1956 Ferrari 250 GT b.Genève Boano Cabriolet

























 

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Felice Mario Boano became known for his flamboyant Chrysler designs that were intricate and well made. It should be no surprise then that he didn't hold back with his first Ferraris.

Such is the case with this 'B Genéve', one of three nearly identical cars with this style. It was built at Carrozerria Boano in Brescia while the regular 250 GT was being made in the same city at Boano/Ellena.

The 'B Genéve' featured a number of unique design traits that were quite profound and had little influence on future Ferrari design. The most obvious of these were curved tail fins that began on front fender and extended to the end of the car. Both the front and rear featured bumpers had abrupt right angles which were quite risky. Fortunately, the car was also well proportioned and inline with other Ferarris of the period.

The car was named after its debut at the 1956 Geneva Show on March 8th. Script on the dashboard read 'B Genéve' alonside the Ferrari script and logo.

The car was purchased new by Rob Lee of Nevada who has maintained the car in original order to this day. He showed it at the 2005 FCA Concours and again at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours.
 

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1960 Ferrari 250 GT Bertone Prototype EW

























 

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Commissioned by Enrico Wax of Genoa and badged as the 'Prototype EW' this car debuted at the 1960 Turin Motor Show as a new 2+2 Ferrari design. Wax was a long-time Ferrari customer who had the finances to support a new model and ordered other daring cars such as 0671SA.

Chassis 1739GT was sent as a bare SWB chassis to Bertone works in Turin to be transformed into this car. It's probably the most unusual SWB with features like a large mesh grill, bright greenhouse and disc wheels.

The alloy body was styled by Giorgietto Giugiaro. His design had a good balance and later lent its front end style when Pietro Frua copied it for the Glas 1700GT. The front end, including grill and headlights, pivoted forward to reveal the engine and a unique front subframe.

On the motor show stand, the 'Prototype EW' was painted in pearlescent paint that may have used fish scales to achieve its color. Inside, Bertone fashioned a custom interior out of leather and aluminum. Included was a pistol-grip shifter and new padded dashboard.

Since this was only the second Ferrari built by Bertone they were likely trying to score an order from Maranello with this showcar. In 1962, Bertone again made another car on chassis 3269GT.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
1966 Ferrari 250 GT NART Spyder













Throughout Ferrari’s history, there is a tradition of modifying the standard models into something more exclusive. Luigi Chinetti, Ferrari’s North American importer, made more of these special cars made than anyone else. He had a remarkable sense for what the American market wanted and in 1965 he envisioned this Spyder design.

Chassis number 2235GT started out life in September of 1960 as a standard 250 GTE 2+2. In the mid-sixites, its Pininfarina bodywork was considered too plain and it was replaced by the order of Luigi Chinetti. He had a one-of body fabricated by Carrozeria Fantuzzi in Italy which mimicked the traits of Ferrari’s mid-engine sports prototypes.

The result was a more dramatic shape with an extended front nose and a 275 GTB-like profile. Many race car traits were borrowed from the 250P such as the rear cut-off Kamm tail and the integrated roll hoop that sat just behind the interior.

Once the new aluminum body and 250 GTE chassis were mated, the engine was rebuilt to Testa Rossa specification by former factory mechanics Alberto Pedretti and Alfredo Caiti of Modena Motors. They fitted Testarossa camshafts, a new intake manifold with six twin-choke Weber carburetors and a 5-speed transmission.

In this more potent guise, 2235GT hit the show circuit including the 1966 NY Auto Show and 1965 San Francisco Show. To underline its credibility, Chinetti fitted his North American Racing Team (NART) logo on the rear of the car.

Built before the famous 275 ‘Nart’ spyders, 2235GT could largely be considered the model’s prototype. One year later, in the spring of 1967, Fantuzzi started production of the 275 GTB ‘NART’ spyders.

After its show duties, 2235GT was sold off and changed hands a few times before a long ownership of 33 years. It was later sent back to the Fantuzzi Corp in 1990 to be stripped and refinished in the mid 1990s. At that point the engine was also rebuilt by Algar Enterprises of Rosemont Pa.
 

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1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe Speciale





http://www.supercars.net/gallery/119513/1484/762314.jpg/img]

[img]http://www.supercars.net/gallery/119513/1508/649341.jpg









While building 250 GT Pinin Farina coupes in quantity, using industrial principals of standardized design, quantity procurement, organized procedures and limited variations, Ferrari and Pinin Farina couldn't resist the temptation to build recognizably individualized variations for special clients.

One of the first to get a one-off 250 GT, based on the production Pinin Farina coupes, was Dottore Wax of Genoa. Another was built for Prince Bertil of Sweden with a step in the top of the fender and horizontal tail lights. Old practices proved difficult to overcome, and special requests from longtime, important clients were difficult to ignore.


The Ferrari 250 GT Coupe Speciale 1187GT is one of the first and most significant of the special-bodied 250 GTs built during the initial run of the 250 GT Pinin Farina coupe and cabriolet. It is powered by the large oil sump, dual-distributor Tipo 128D engine.

The Ferrari 250 GT Coupe Speciale 1187GT is one of the first and most significant of the special-bodied 250 GTs built during the initial run of the 250 GT Pinin Farina coupe and cabriolet. It is powered by the large oil sump, dual-distributor Tipo 128D engine.

Ferrari historian Marcel Massini records that it was displayed at the 29th Geneva Motor Show March 12-22,1959, along with a pair of standard 250 GTs, a Pinin Farina coupe, a Series I cabriolet and a 410 Superamerica coupe. Its appearance with the 410 SA is significant, since the style of the two was somewhat similar.

To create the 250 GT Coupe Speciale Pinin Farina blended elements of both cars, retaining the basic design and concept of the Pinin Farina coupe nose, grille, headlights and bumpers, and also the 250 GTs trunk lid recessed between the fenders with vertical taillights over a wraparound rear bumper.

Despite this retention of standard Pinin Farina coupe elements, it was the greenhouse that differed so distinctively from the Pinin Farina coupe and which so gracefully complemented the 410 Superamerica that shared the Geneva Show space. Slim pillars, a thin almost two dimensional roof, large wraparound rear window and large quarter windows created an entirely different aspect from the more formal and reserved blind-quarter Pinin Farina coupe style.

The body flanks also contrasted with the Pinin Farina coupe. A gentle indentation tapered back in a moderate curve, from a sharp point at the top of the front wheel arch to a broader intersection with the rear-wheel opening.

Bright metal defined a front-fender engine-compartment air vent that further distinguished the Coupe Speciale from the standard Pinin Farina coupe's unadorned fender. There was nothing deliberately extravagant, no flamboyant features, fins or bright metal adornments.

Following its appearance on the Geneva Show stand, the 250 GT Coupe Speciale 1187GT (It was sold to engineer Emanuele Nasi of Turin in May 1959. Nasi had earned a special Ferrari the old-fashioned way: his father had married Aniceta Agnelli of Fiat. Exported to the United States only a few years later, it had two known owners in California before being acquired by Greg Garrison in 1986 and undergoing a complete restoration. When displayed in Geneva the 250 GT Coupe Speciale was presented in (Grigio Metallizzato Speciale with black leather and plastic interior.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
1961 Ferrari 250 GT Coupé Aerodinamico







Ferrari customers commissioned a range of unique bodies on the 250GT which can only be lumped together as Speciales. Included with these is the Aerodinamico which uses an unusual blend of various other body styles.

Aerodinamicos were built on the short wheel base (SWB) 250 chassis. Their body design combined the SWB front end with 400 Superamerica bodywork including the very rounded-off rear end.

Less than five examples Speciales where produced and some people include chassis 2643GT, the GTO prototype, in this list. Chassis 3615GT and 2429GT had competition engines producing 270 bhp. Our feature cars are 2821GT and 2613GT, both having the normal specification V12 with produced 240 horse power.

While these Ferraris were never raced, they combined the luxury of the Superamerica body with 250 GT performance.
 

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1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Speciale





















Among all the 250 specials, this unique cabriolet built on 1737GT is one of the best. Not only does it have a custom body, but one fashioned in aluminum that covers a bespoke interior and engine.

By 1960 Pininfarina had stopped construction of Ferrari's competition cars to focus on regular production of the 250 GT as both a coupe and convertible.

As the occasion arose, Pininfarina dressed up several chassis for customers such as Price Bernard of the Netherlands and Princess Lilian of Belgium. These unique coupes took traits of Ferrari's 400 Superamerica line and applied them sparingly to several 250 GTs. The same is true for our feature car 1737GT which was built on the short-wheel-base 2400mm chassis.

Wanting to impress the crowds at the Geneva Motor Show, this Cabriolet Speciale was heavily detailed both in and out. The body shape was similar to the Ferrari 400 of the period, having covered headlights, three-part rear lights and a notched rear trunk. Unlike the regular Superamerica body, 1737GT benefited from an all-aluminum construction.

Further enhancing the performance pedigree of this model is a Tipo 128F competition-spec engine from the Testa Rossa. It produces nearly 300 bhp on a good day. For extra rigidity, the engine compartment has extra bracing which also supports a brake booster.

Inside the cockpit is a lavish interior that was the best Pininfarina had on offer in 1960. The dashboard was entirely new and contrasted heavily by ivory leather seats.

After being displayed at Geneva, it was sold to France and remained there until 1979 when Peter Sachs imported it to America. Eventually Oscar Davis purchased 1737GT and had it restored by Classic Coach Repair in 1993. The spectacular restoration was completed in a hue of Azzuro Reale, complete with matching hardtop.

Davis then showed the car for the next 20 years, appearing at Cavallino five times, Pebble Beach Concours in 1994 and Ferrari's 50th Anniversary in 1997.
 

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1957 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe Speciale







Sometimes known as the Pinin Farina Speciales, these unique cars combined the sporting heritage of the 250 GT chassis with the luxurious refinement usually reserved for the Superamera line. Only two such examples were made, 0725GT and 0751GT.


A 250 GT for Royalty

The story of the 250 Pinin Farina Speciale begina with HRH Price Bernard of the Netherlands. His appreciation of the Ferrari brand began with a 212 series of which he owned two. As the prince maintained a personal relationship with Enzo Ferrari, when it came to ordering a new 250GT, custom appointments and specification were a must.

The Prince's car was built on a type 508C chassis that supported a special type 128MMC engine which was a revision of the type 128C having a larger bore of 75mm. This larger bore increased the engine capacity to 3117cc with power ranging somewhere between 240 to 260 hp.
Pinin Farina Coachwork

During the fifties, Pinin Farina was becoming increasingly confident making custom bodies for the 400 Superamerica and 410 Superamerica. These large displacement Ferraris were produced in strictly limited edition for important clientele. No surprise, when a 250 was ordered for the Dutch Royalty, it received the high level of attention that was usually reserved for the Superamerica.

Finished in mid-1957, 0725GT was distinct in detail but shared much with earlier Pinin Farina designs. As an example, the 250 Cabriolet Series I and a single 410 Superamerica shared the same front end with 0725GT, complete with independent front bumperettes.

Later in 1957, another chassis, #0751, was ordered for Princess Lilane de Rethy of Belgium. This chassis became a sister car to #0725GT made earlier for the Dutch Prince. In many regards, especially in styling, chassis #0725GT and #0751GT received similar treatment from Pinin Farina.


Pebble Beach Reunion

Both chassis 0725GT and 0751GT are seen above at the 2001 Pebble Beach Concours. The darker car is chassis #0725GT which still retains its original Dutch AA13 royal plate. The lighter car is chassis 0751GT which was Princess Lilane's personal transport.

Specification listed is for chassis 0725GT with the Tipo 128MMC engine.
 

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1959 Ferrari-Chevrolet 250 GT Coupe





When the supply of European replacement engines dried up in the sixties many enterprising racers stuffed American V8s into orphaned Ferraris, Maseratis and Jaguars. These modified sports cars extended the usefulness of some old workhorses that were permitted in SCCA and Cal Club racing. Such is the case with our feature car which is one of the oldest surviving Ferrari street rods.

Like many V8 transplants, this 250 GT needed considerable inner fender modifications to fit a V8 in the engine bay. Installed in this Ferrari was a 1969 small block Corvette engine attached to a three speed T400 automatic transmission. It may have been possible that a 283 was first installed in California for racing. Other upgrades included AC Delco disc brakes, removal of the front bumper and a Ford 9-inch rear axle.

Do to their weight, very few Pininfarina Coupes were raced and our feature car might be one of the few used in SCCA/Cal Club west coast events. When installed with a V8, the car moved from B Production to C Modified class. With the 350 upfront the car currently weighs 2994 lbs (1359 kg)

Since the mid 1990s, this Coupe has been owned and campaigned by Randy Cook who has shown it at numerous events. He has maintained the car and plans to keep it as Ferrari's last street rod.
 

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1964 Ferrari 250 GT Drogo Berlinetta



In 1964, Ferrari GTO 3445GT was rebodied into the design you see here. Before this new body was fitted, the racing career of 3445GT was extensive, competing in the greatest endurance races of the era.

After a long and hard life, the GTO's body was too tired to consider saving and its owner Ulf Norinder sent the chassis to Carrozzeria Sports Cars in Modena for a new lease on life. At that time, Piero Drogo was in charge of the company with partners Otello Benedetti and Mario Allegretti under the official name Sports Cars di Benedetti & C. (1963 to 1969)

This car followed a string of Ferrari competition cars that were remodeled by Drogo throughout the sixties. By 1965, the GTO had outlasted its usefulness in racing so a more lavish body was drawn up which wasn't too dissimilar from the GTO.

The new body featured a much wider front grill, sleeker fastback profile, Ferrari 250LM front windscreen (which was much lower), larger side vents and a rear hatch. At the same time, the car retained its original headlamps and doors.

Eventually, the car was damaged in 1976 and subsequently restored back to its 1962 configuration. At some point the Drogo body was either saved or fitted on another chassis.

4769GT was sold at RM Auction's 2006 Monterey Sports car Auction for $275,000 USD with a replica of the original design. It was described as "a 1963 Ferrari 250 GTE 2+2 with a gorgeous Drogo inspired replica body. The work done by Allegretti was top notch and today the car remains in very nice cosmetic condition with very strong mechanicals."
 

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1957 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupé Prototipo



















At the Geneva Show in March 1956, Ferrari displayed the replacement for the 250 Europa GT. Chassis architecture for the new car was quite similar to its predecessor, but the styling was updated with this first prototype.

Pinin Farina was responsible for the new design which included a much smaller front grill and discrete rear tail fins. These changes were borrowed from the Series II 410 Superamerica which was also a Pinin Farina design.

Chassis 0429GT was first displayed at Geneva with a steel body and aluminum doors and hood. This was followed up by four more Pinin Farina prototypes, two completely made in aluminum. These cars had a distinctive kick-up rear fenders that were not included when the model reached series production.

The new cars shared the same 2600mm wheelbase and short-block Colombo-designed V12 as the Europa GT. Small changes were made to the design to increase production feasibility.

Ferrari was very serious about producing the 250 GT Coupe in large numbers, so much so Pinin Farina couldn't handle the expected production workload, especially since their new factory at Grugliasco wasn't complete. Ferrari instead turned to Carrozzeria Boano for production of the bodies and interiors based on the Pinin Farina design.

Boano had both a design house in Turin and a production plant in Brescia that could handle large orders. Called Carrozzeria Boano Lavorazioni Speciali this dedicated factory in Brescia was produced with funding from the Ellena family. They gladly accepted the order from Ferrari which was significant.

Eventually, 65 cars were built at Boano's facility until Ellena took over the facility completely. An additional 40 cars were built as the '250 GT Ellena' before the model was phased out for the next Pinin Farina coupe.


Chassis

0429GT- First prototype fashioned in steel. Shown at the 1956 Geneva Motor Show with an exterior color of silver with dark red roof. Later restored and painted entirely red. Competed in the 96, 97, 98 and 99 Mille Miglia Retrospective. Shown at the 2001 Concorso Italiano and 2002 Pebble Beach Concours.

0435GT - Steel car. Sold at Bonhams Ferrari et les Prestigieuses Italiennes Auction for CHF362,700 inclusive of Buyer's Premium. Described as "is the fourth of approximately nine (expert opinion differs with regard to the exact number) 250GTs completed by Pinin Farina before production was transferred to Boano. The factory build sheet, a copy of which is available for inspection, shows that ‘0435GT’ left the factory in October 1955 and was completed at Pinin Farina early in April 1956. It also shows that ‘0435GT’ received the esperimentale Porsche synchromesh gears, making it certainly one of the very first Ferraris to benefit from this desirable feature.
Indeed, the vendor has confirmed that Porsche’s advanced synchromesh makes this car a joy to drive, unlike many of its contemporary rivals.
Cantelli, the first owner, registered the Ferrari in Italy in August 1956 and later that same year the car was registered in Switzerland where it has remained ever since. ‘0435GT’ was known to Ferrari enthusiasts in Switzerland in the 1980s and 1990s when it belonged to Jean-Pierre Oberson, of Fribourg, a former mechanic and Ferrari connoisseur."
 

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Much appreciated thread!
 

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You know, 1957 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupé Prototipo looks VERY much like a 1957 Volvo P1800.



Just an observation.
 
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