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Cardinals!
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http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/9731696/ea-sports-clc-settle-lawsuits-40-million-source

ESPN said:
Video game producer EA Sports and Collegiate Licensing Company will pay around $40 million to settle lawsuits brought by former players whose likenesses were used without compensation, a source familiar with the negotiations told ESPN's Tom Farrey on Friday.

The number of players to benefit is between 200,000 and 300,000, said Steve Berman, managing partner of the law firm Hagens Berman, who served as co-lead counsel in the class-action lawsuit brought by the players.

Current players are eligible to take part in the settlement, sources told ESPN, raising questions about how the NCAA will treat any such financial awards under its rules, which prohibit players from making money from their name as an athlete.

Stacy Osborn, NCAA spokeswoman, told ESPN: "Since we have not had a chance to review the proposed terms of the settlement, we won't speculate."

Rob Carey, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, said there is precedent for allowing such payments in the "Johnny Football" case.

A man who sold shirts using Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel's trademarked name was sued, and the NCAA has ruled that if Manziel collects damages, he can keep them as long as they are not paid until after his eligibility expires.

It has not yet been determined how the settlement money will be divided. Much of the focus of the lawsuits has been on EA Sports' college football game. Since the lawsuit brought by former UCLA basketball player Ed O'Bannon was also settled, though, former players who did not appear in video games will still receive some sort of compensation, a source told ESPN.

Although the video games did not use their names, the former college athletes alleged EA Sports used the same jersey numbers, heights, weights, skin tones, hair colors and home states in its in-game bios, not only without permission but also without compensation.

Berman said negotiations started in earnest the past few weeks on the heels of an appellate court affirming in July a U.S. District Court decision that EA could not use a First Amendment defense of free speech.

EA Sports -- which will not admit any wrongdoing as part of the settlement agreement -- said in a statement Thursday that "we follow rules that are set by the NCAA -- but those rules are being challenged by some student-athletes."

The NCAA said earlier this year that it would take its name off the college football game, but that does not absolve the governing body of previous legal exposure. With EA Sports and CLC dropped as defendants, the NCAA will be litigated against alone in the class-action lawsuits spearheaded by former college quarterback Sam Keller and O'Bannon.

NCAA chief legal officer Donald Remy told USA Today that the NCAA was "not prepared to compromise on this case."

Michael Hausfeld, another of the plaintiffs lawyer, believes the NCAA will argue the case all the way to the Supreme Court.

"I think that's a realization that that's where they have to take it," he said. "You don't make that announcement if you have comfort that you're going to win at the trial and appellate stages."

Beginning next year, EA Sports no longer will produce its popular "NCAA Football" game, which included former Michigan star Denard Robinson on the cover for the 2014 version, which was released in July.
So, lets see..
- $40m gross payout..
- anywhere from $5m to $20m lawyer fees over the past 3-4 years..
- divided among 200k to 300k players..
- minus ~25% taxes on settlement income..

= Each player receives somewhere between $50-$131 after all is said and done.

Not to mention every former NCAA football player I personally know (I've talked to 7, 2 of which also spent time in the NFL) loved just being in the game.. and ruining that fun opportunity for all future players, as well as allowing it to also be a promotional tool for national popularity. It's a vocal minority that came up with the idea of suing a game company that is essentially promoting them for free. The players aren't the game's core for sales.. it's the schools and conferences that are.

Was that really worth it?

Down to the core of the issue:

How is this playing for 'free'?
- Full tuition paid for.
- Full room & board paid for.
- Full food paid for.
- Full books and other class expenses paid for.
- Full tutoring and class 'assistance' to ensure grades are up.
- Nearly full healthcare coverage.
- Full use of non-general student training facilities.
- Full training and coaching to develop your skills as a player.
- Opportunity to advance to the NFL.

Players, tell you what. The schools will allow you to get paid to play (not directly, but through boosters/whoever), but you'll have to pay every bit of your way through school. That includes tuition, living arrangement, food, books, tutoring, healthcare, training facilities, coaching & development as a player, and the opportunity to showcase your talent for potential NFL draft. Oh, and you'll have to maintain a passing GPA on your own with a full course load to remain eligible.

How many players will come to their senses and realize that boosters aren't going to pay any but a select few of them the $200k+ a year in value that they're receiving for 'free' right now?
 

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2014 E63 S
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I think most players just enjoyed being in the video game and would be pissed they are no longer going to make it. Especially if the only compensation they might have ever received is enough to fill up your gas tank.
 

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iSPOOL
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http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/9731696/ea-sports-clc-settle-lawsuits-40-million-source


So, lets see..
  • $40m gross payout..
  • anywhere from $5m to $20m lawyer fees over the past 3-4 years..
  • divided among 200k to 300k players..
  • minus ~25% taxes on settlement income..
= Each player receives somewhere between $50-$131 after all is said and done.

Not to mention every former NCAA football player I personally know (I've talked to 7, 2 of which also spent time in the NFL) loved just being in the game.. and ruining that fun opportunity for all future players, as well as allowing it to also be a promotional tool for national popularity. It's a vocal minority that came up with the idea of suing a game company that is essentially promoting them for free. The players aren't the game's core for sales.. it's the schools and conferences that are.

Was that really worth it?

Down to the core of the issue:

How is this playing for 'free'?
  • Full tuition paid for.
  • Full room & board paid for.
  • Full food paid for.
  • Full books and other class expenses paid for.
  • Full tutoring and class 'assistance' to ensure grades are up.
  • Nearly full healthcare coverage.
  • Full use of non-general student training facilities.
  • Full training and coaching to develop your skills as a player.
  • Opportunity to advance to the NFL.
Players, tell you what. The schools will allow you to get paid to play (not directly, but through boosters/whoever), but you'll have to pay every bit of your way through school. That includes tuition, living arrangement, food, books, tutoring, healthcare, training facilities, coaching & development as a player, and the opportunity to showcase your talent for potential NFL draft. Oh, and you'll have to maintain a passing GPA on your own with a full course load to remain eligible.

How many players will come to their senses and realize that boosters aren't going to pay any but a select few of them the $200k+ a year in value that they're receiving for 'free' right now?
Sorry Reviving an old thread. So much is off here. Your wording makes it obvious you haven't played at the collegiate level. Yes it was cool being in the game but simultaneously our likeness was used for profit. We understood that going in but as stated its more to it than "why are you complaining since you're already on scholarship?" Be mindful not every one was on a full ride.

I wish I would have known about this lawsuit earlier since a few of my friends were paid into the thousands. Not maxed out at $131...
 
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