Supra Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
1988 MA70 Turbo
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Doing an ABS delete. I don't want to hear opinions please. This is a secondary weekend driver which will not see much rain and definitely will never see snow.

Just wondering if all that is required is to simply remove the ABS module, ABS computer, and simplify my braking lines from the proportioning valve to the calipers.

Mostly wondering if I need to change or remove anything else like the speed sensor, or if it as simple a job as what I outlined above.

I ride a sportbike with no ABS, please don't tell me what I already know about braking safety and road conditions.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
There's a sensor on the tailshaft of the transmission. I suppose it doesn't hurt to leave it there since you'd have to otherwise plug the hole with either a plate or freeze plug.
 

·
Registered
1987 Toyota Supra
Joined
·
693 Posts
Are you removing all components or just disabling it?

If you are removing it all, there was someone looking to add ABS to their vehicle.
Might be worth having some one else use the components in their vehicle.
Don't remember where I saw it though.
 

·
Registered
1988 MA70 Turbo
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There's a sensor on the tailshaft of the transmission. I suppose it doesn't hurt to leave it there since you'd have to otherwise plug the hole with either a plate or freeze plug.
So it's an ABS specific sensor, not for anything else?
Are you removing all components or just disabling it?

If you are removing it all, there was someone looking to add ABS to their vehicle.
Might be worth having some one else use the components in their vehicle.
Don't remember where I saw it though.
At the point I'm at, Planning to remove it as the engine is out and lines are easy to get to. Wasn't planning on taking out the wheel ABS sensors those are a huge pain to get out.

My system is from an 88 Turbo, I legitimately have no idea if it is operational or not as it has never kicked in once, even in a huge rain storm, no ABS. Maybe the fuze was just blown or it is actually non-operational, either way, I'm planning for it to be gone!
 

·
Registered
1987 Toyota Supra
Joined
·
693 Posts
To save weight and clean up the engine bay?
Or just remove it because it's already in-op?

Regardless it does not matter.

All the locations of the ABS components are in the TSRM.
Remove wheel speed sensors, trans tailshaft sensor, ABS computer, ABS pump, ect...
Re make all the lines and route them all as if it had no ABS.

You could disassemble the wiring harnesses and remove those wires and connectors if you want to be through.

Just unplugging the ABS computer alone will disable the system.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,393 Posts
My advice would be to get your car up and running first before you start tearing apart additional stuff for cosmetic/weight saving reasons. It's very easy to add very big problems when everything's in a million pieces already. With a situation like yours, and an ABS delete, that often leads to the brake lines etc all sitting 'dry' for long periods of time.
Doing it now either incurs the additional expense of bleeding the whole system and working that out only to have the fluid etc sit and need to be re-bled and refreshed anyway when the engine's finally in, or it leaves the lines empty which can let rust, etc creep into the lines, caliper seals can dry out and leak, all adding additional time and money expense for the sake of doing it now instead of once the car's up and running.

There's this romantic idea of a build like your car being 'done' or having it all sorted out the first time it sees pavement.
My experience over the past 20 years has proven that to be 100% false, as romantic as it is. You're doing a massive drivetrain swap with a lot of complicated details and you'd be best served getting that part of it running and driving first, making good safe power, shaking things out for driveability and getting that at least 90% of the way done to 'road trip ready'.

Then and only then move on to cosmetic/cleanup/'because I like it this way' sorts of changes.
 

·
Registered
1988 MA70 Turbo
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My advice would be to get your car up and running first before you start tearing apart additional stuff for cosmetic/weight saving reasons. It's very easy to add very big problems when everything's in a million pieces already. With a situation like yours, and an ABS delete, that often leads to the brake lines etc all sitting 'dry' for long periods of time.
Doing it now either incurs the additional expense of bleeding the whole system and working that out only to have the fluid etc sit and need to be re-bled and refreshed anyway when the engine's finally in, or it leaves the lines empty which can let rust, etc creep into the lines, caliper seals can dry out and leak, all adding additional time and money expense for the sake of doing it now instead of once the car's up and running.

There's this romantic idea of a build like your car being 'done' or having it all sorted out the first time it sees pavement.
My experience over the past 20 years has proven that to be 100% false, as romantic as it is. You're doing a massive drivetrain swap with a lot of complicated details and you'd be best served getting that part of it running and driving first, making good safe power, shaking things out for driveability and getting that at least 90% of the way done to 'road trip ready'.

Then and only then move on to cosmetic/cleanup/'because I like it this way' sorts of changes.
Valid concern, but I'm also planning on repainting my engine bay so I'm working on removing my components in there to do a proper job, doing the ABS delete either via non-abs hardlines, or just buying the Ward auto mk3 abs delete kit, then bleeding my brakes and having them sit with fluid in them. I have to take it all out anyways, and I'm not confident in the ABS' functionality due to never experiencing it and personally, not feeling a need for it on this vehicle.

and as for the additional expense, if I have to spend the money on brake fluid and lines and spend the time bleeding them twice, so be it. Brake booster and master cylinder are coming off anyways.

And oh I have no faith that it will be problem free upon being put back together, it's not my first project car lol.

there's no rush, I haven't done it yet, but it's my car and decision to do this if I actually go ahead with it!

I guess one last question, if deleting ABS, would changing out the master cylinder for a non-abs unit be something I'd need to do?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,393 Posts
Valid concern, but I'm also planning on repainting my engine bay so I'm working on removing my components in there to do a proper job, doing the ABS delete either via non-abs hardlines, or just buying the Ward auto mk3 abs delete kit, then bleeding my brakes and having them sit with fluid in them. I have to take it all out anyways, and I'm not confident in the ABS' functionality due to never experiencing it and personally, not feeling a need for it on this vehicle.

and as for the additional expense, if I have to spend the money on brake fluid and lines and spend the time bleeding them twice, so be it. Brake booster and master cylinder are coming off anyways.

And oh I have no faith that it will be problem free upon being put back together, it's not my first project car lol.

there's no rush, I haven't done it yet, but it's my car and decision to do this if I actually go ahead with it!

I guess one last question, if deleting ABS, would changing out the master cylinder for a non-abs unit be something I'd need to do?
Fair 'nuff, so long as you know what's required! 🍺

No need to go to a different master cylinder, I've never noticed or observed a functional difference between the master cyls on ABS or non ABS MK3's.

I will say, though, that while the stock calipers suck, if you ever go to a BBK the ABS is damn nice to have, and it does work pretty well especially for a 1980's design.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top