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Hiya! I think it goes without saying that my dream car is a manual MK.IV Supra. I am on the Supra Forums after all. But, I don't have the funds, knowledge or experience to own and build such a thing any time soon.
Given the whole lockdown situation, I finally got tired of dreaming about owning a Supra and decided to make a build list/spreadsheet, so that I would finally have an approximate price/number to aim for, a goal of sorts. I know it's nothing major, but it is an attempt at the first steps.
But the main problem I came across was that beyond wheels, tyres, suspension and brakes I honestly don't know what to look for/avoid.
The 'dream' of sorts, is to have it making around 700whp, running on E85, on a stock body (w/ rolled fenders etc, the necessary stuff), single turbo setup, straight piped etc.

What little experience I do have is mostly in wheels, tyres, brakes and suspension. My neighbour owns an old MR2, and he showed me how to roll fenders, change out the suspension, bleed brakes, change brake discs/calipers etc. But I haven't got a clue when it comes to engine work (I am aware that not all cars are the same, but I get the fundamentals).

Obviously I can't afford a Mk.IV Supra, or a running 2JZ-GTE to work on. But, I know that Lexus did often use the non-turbo 2JZ-GE engines in some of their LS 300 models, and I can pick one of those up for anywhere between £600 - £1500. So, although a 2JZ-GE is not a 2JZ-GTE, it's pretty damn close. Meaning, I'd be able to learn the basics of working on the 2JZ platform without spending a fortune on just the engine, especially as a GTE is £5k+.

Basically what I am trying to say is, is there somewhere I can find a full build list for a Supra similar to this idea I have? Or a guide to building 2JZ engines at different power bands? And, am I going about getting 2JZ platform knowledge in the best way? Or should I be doing something else/differently?

Btw, I'm based in the UK, and will be for the foreseeable future, so obviously some things will vary in accessibility and price due to location.

Cheers in advance!
 

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1987 MA71 R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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Ok, so I think you have some good intentions but blended goals.

You say you don't have the funds for a MK4, but want to build out a 700HP engine. I think your first priority should be to simply figure out how to get a MK4, or MK3, and maintain or return it to stable running condition.

Supras are all very old cars now. If you find one in excellent condition, it will cost a lot. If you find one in poor condition, it will ALSO cost a lot to fix. Either way, accept the horsepower it has and concentrate on it being reliable and learn as much as you can about it. Then, after that is accomplished you'll be able to move on to tweaking it out! :)

I've owned my 87 7M-GTE for 25 years and I still spend money on it. (y)
 

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Ok, so I think you have some good intentions but blended goals.

You say you don't have the funds for a MK4, but want to build out a 700HP engine. I think your first priority should be to simply figure out how to get a MK4, or MK3, and maintain or return it to stable running condition.

Supras are all very old cars now. If you find one in excellent condition, it will cost a lot. If you find one in poor condition, it will ALSO cost a lot to fix. Either way, accept the horsepower it has and concentrate on it being reliable and learn as much as you can about it. Then, after that is accomplished you'll be able to move on to tweaking it out! :)

I've owned my 87 7M-GTE for 25 years and I still spend money on it. (y)
Hey mate, apologies for not getting back to you sooner, I've been in the midst of part-1 assessments for just short of a week.

I agree with what you're saying. The ideal very much got blended with the reality (I have ADHD, so it can be difficult to organise thoughts etc).
And what you were saying does make a lot of sense, it is very easy to forget that Supras (especially the MK.4) are certainly 'old' cars, especially when social media is chocked full of fully modified/customised MK.4s.

So, scrap what I was saying earlier. And picking up from what you said earlier, maintaining. Obviously things like brake discs, pads, tyres, oils (engine, transmission, diffs etc) need to be checked and replaced regularly (according to wear/usage rates), but is there anything else? Is something like a MK.3 or a MK.4 prone to rust formations? Or electrical/wiring failure with age?

Really appreciate the response by the way. I understand that it can probably be pretty irritating talking to beginners/pretty clueless people!!
 

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1987 MA71 R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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:) Welcome back.

So for my MK3 recently I went through and cleaned up all the fluids.
  • Ford Motorcraft 75w-90 gear oil with LSD modifier for the diff. I saw this recommendation in several places. Works great! 24mm drain and fill bolts. Make sure you can open the fill before draining it.
  • Redline M/T-90 gear oil in my R154 transmission. 5speed loves it. Same idea with the fill and drain plugs as the diff.
  • Mobile1 Synthetic 15w50 engine oil for my 7M-GTE. Toyota oil filterSeems to run very well
  • New Mishimoto aluminum radiator with Mishimoto 158F thermostat. Redline Water Wetter, Toyota Red Coolant, regular water. Amazing difference in heat dissipation.
  • Fram fuel filter.
MK4s I have no idea about, but MK3s are prone to rust in the rear from leaking tail lights and hatch seals.

Also, after 30 years any car near the ocean or snow might have an issue with rust.

Electrical on my MK3 has been very stable but there are a few things like the Knock sensors and tail lamp module (that tells you if an tail light is burnt out) can be disconnected and bypassed as they go bad.
 

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:) Welcome back.

So for my MK3 recently I went through and cleaned up all the fluids.
  • Ford Motorcraft 75w-90 gear oil with LSD modifier for the diff. I saw this recommendation in several places. Works great! 24mm drain and fill bolts. Make sure you can open the fill before draining it.
  • Redline M/T-90 gear oil in my R154 transmission. 5speed loves it. Same idea with the fill and drain plugs as the diff.
  • Mobile1 Synthetic 15w50 engine oil for my 7M-GTE. Toyota oil filterSeems to run very well
  • New Mishimoto aluminum radiator with Mishimoto 158F thermostat. Redline Water Wetter, Toyota Red Coolant, regular water. Amazing difference in heat dissipation.
  • Fram fuel filter.
MK4s I have no idea about, but MK3s are prone to rust in the rear from leaking tail lights and hatch seals.

Also, after 30 years any car near the ocean or snow might have an issue with rust.

Electrical on my MK3 has been very stable but there are a few things like the Knock sensors and tail lamp module (that tells you if an tail light is burnt out) can be disconnected and bypassed as they go bad.
Yeah, I would imagine that even in the best of conditions, a 25+ year old car would have difficulties with rust or mineral deposits. Especially near my town, there's a lot of granite in both the ground and tap water, so as soon as it rains or you hose down your car, and it dries, then it just gets covered in a dirt/dust-like coating. It makes it a nightmare for cleaning and maintaining.

Is there any particular reason you went with the Mishimoto radiator? Or was it just a case of what fits and works?
And the same for Toyota's own red coolant? Any reasoning behind the choice? Or just personal preference?
 

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Wow, that granite dust must be something. :(

Mishimoto had good reviews wherever I went and they make a unit specifically for the cars. (MK3 in my case) Also, I had a local parts store new thermostat that I think was suspect as my temperature gauge would move around a lot before settling. With the new Mishimoto gauge it warms up and stays put. Also its 158F, which is much lower than 180 or 190F thermostats. I live in SoCal so the temp never freezes here and it works fine with a lower temp thermo.

Also, you can tell the thermostat is MUCH better made, albiet it is MUCH more expensive lol.

The Toyota coolant is interesting. My whole life I used Prestone green, and whatever my newer cars came with I just left it alone and let service handle it. This time around, since I was replacing the radiator, the thermo and flushing it, I did some research on different methods.

In the end, since it was a fresh flush, even with the back flush n fill kit you hook to the radiator hose, I decided to try something different.

Before I flushed I was running a 50/50 Prestone mix with a radiator that was last replaced in 2008 but a new thermostat. . Temperature would wander around, and also if I ran it just a bit hard locally, it would rise to over half way on the gauge. It wasn't overheating, but it was running hotter and it would never cool down until I shut it down and left it.

After the flush I ran 1 bottle of the wetter, about half a gallon of Toyota Red, and the rest water. I also filled the overflow tank with only Toyota red. Now, it doesn't matter. Cool day, hot day, hot rodding, normal driving, the temp gauge gets to that classic 4 o'clock Toyota position and stays put. (My 2002 4Runner does the same)

Also my clutch doesn't fade like it would before, which I'm sure is related to heat.

But read around as well. You'll find what works for you. :)
 
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