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Trust In Trance
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Best 1999-2002 trance recommendations? Similar to George Acosta.

https://youtu.be/yEMt9esDe1g?t=6490

Something like this.


Sir, drinks on me for this amazing old school mix. And im happy to see another old school trance listener ;)

Now, speaking of music...i dont know do you want old mixes/tracks, or you want new trance that sounds, or is similar like late 90s trance.


If you just joined, i posted couple pages ago Johan Gielen last year tour calls "Trance Classics"...mixing all the good old trance tracks.






Or we can remember some of his and other old school guys sets from early 2000s at "Trance Energy" and "Sensation White"






Ahhhh.....the memories....
 

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Trust In Trance
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That last one... yeah talk about good memories. Thanks for posting!

These were the times...no cell phones, no selfies, no updating FB to show everyone where you are... and DJs working there asses off with records :) But i have to say that even today (true) trance fans are rarely on their phones at the parties. They do record some songs, but are definitely concentrated on the music. However, late 90s-early 2000s are definitely special times for Trance fans, hence the comments on youtube that some people would "give away the rest of their life just to relive these moments once again".

But, going through these old videos and reading some of the comments, made me nostalgic and think, where and how it all started for me.....

I got to Trance through some commercial "rave" tracks in mid 90s...i think i was like 14-15y old...and the first few tracks that i can remember listening that had influence on me were :







Then from here i jumped immediately to : Paul Van Dyk, Robert Miles, DJ Quicksilver, Paul Oakenfold, Dj Crow, Brooklyn Bounce, ATB, Mauro Picoto...and my Trance journey began :)

2 years later, in 1997-1998, i entered the world of Psychedelic Trance as well, thanks to 2 Goa fanatics from my local gym that im forever grateful.....but that's another story :)
 

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Trust In Trance
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780 Posts
How to Talk to Your Kids About Trance



Trance music is still one of the most common and universal forms of modern dance music, even though it largely eludes mainstream recognition. It’s a style that’s burned hard and long for going on 30 years now, and it’s graduated to become sort of the classic rock of big-tent dance music.

Like the pills with which its forebears were often associated, trance is pure, concentrated melodrama in electronic music form, meant to stir you and twirl you before ultimately melting your heart into one big PLUR’d-out sunset.

At times saccharine and at times more psychedelic or dark, trance is almost always a bombastic affair. There are many substrains of trance, but I’m here to talk about the down-the-middle, true blue trance trance. Uplifting trance—as it’s often referred to—is space opera, melodramatic to the core, yet populist and inviting. It’s all-ages music gushing with a spectrum of uncynical emotions.

We now have household trance names like Armin van Buuren, Paul Oakenfold, Paul van Dyk (there are many Pauls in trance, FYI), Markus Shulz, and everything in between. Rarely subtle, trance is athemic by definition. It’s bursting with melodies you can hum along or fist-pump to. There has become a sort of formula to what we call trance now. Its detractors are bored by this, but its fanatics have drawn very clear lines between the classical’s mathematical construction and the compositions at play in trance.

Beyond the theoretical, trance is functional music. It’s music for raving, born out of early raves and later brought to big-time parties and festivals. It’s big, fat theatrical music that serenades your inner theater kid—or just your inner kid. It’s typically a bit faster than your average house or disco, with BPMs anywhere in the 120–150 range.

Trance was born after disco became house, and later, techno. Its emergence in the late ‘80s coincides with the birth of Balearic, rave, and the second summer of love in the UK. Proto-trance cuts like the KLF’s 1988 “What Time Is Love (Pure Trance)” showed this beautiful, intense promise of what trance and progressive house would later touch on. Acid house and even Belgian new beat were likely influences on the early wave of trance sounds that were rolling out in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s.

Dance 2 Trance was a trance duo making tunes in a reunified Germany. Their 1991 track “We Came in Peace,” a celestial bit of early trance, is still cited as one of the scene’s early classics and features a sample of astronaut Neil Armstrong talking about the US’s agenda in the space race—but flipped to be more abstract. This was on the more ambient, more mellow side of trance.

A year later, Germany’s Jam & Spoon would drop several seminal trance 12-inches with tracks like the romantic, piano-touched “Stella” and a blistering remix of “Age of Love” by Age of Love. The latter in particular showed the dynamic, dramatic possibilities and did so with a killer arpeggiated bassline and angelic disco choir, which conjur that Outrun-like vibe of hauling ass down the Autobahn, pushing 110mph. Classic.

As the decade wore on, German producers were still leaders of the trance explosion, with the likes of Dr. Atomic’s “Schudelfloss” and Energy 52’s “Cafe Del Mar” lighting up raves the world over and inspiring the spread of this sound across Europe, the States, and Asia, most famously.

In 2014, FACT called this primitive phase of trance “the three years or so when trance’s identity gradually emerged from the drug-doused experiments of a bunch of Frankfurt techno-heads, British new-age cowboys and various wideboys on acid were fervid times, with an awful lot going on that people are probably best off forgetting.”

Things started to get smoother and more refined (and less feral) in the mid to late ‘90s, as technology improved—and became more affordable—and producers generally became more sophisticated and capable of achieving a polished sound. Likewise, melody became ever more prominent.

Melody in trance is generally a big deal. The whole “uplifting” part? That comes from dramatic chord—and often key—changes. Trance DJs popularized the practice of mixing in key, which means you mix in the same key or use specific other keys to jump to, in order to achieve harmonious blends. This lends transitions between songs an exaggeration or pronounced shift in mood. Here’s the basic theory behind that. If you wanna be a deified trance lord, you must learn how to mix in key.

So, a whole new slew of trance DJs and producers started to crop up across Europe. (Meanwhile, Goa trance developed a few thousand miles away on its own psych-y path, but that’s a story for another day.) Vocals started cropping up in trance—and not just samples, but full verse-chorus-verse sort of compositions—gaining an ever-increasing prominence in the genre. Lyrically, there’s not much to separate trance from general top-40 pop lyrics, in that they both go for big, universal themes that match the galactic scale of the music.

As the ‘90s progressed, titans like Sasha, Digweed, and Paul Oakenfold would emerge, as well as W&W, Cosmic Gate, and Ferry Corston. This is the golden era of trance, as this wild dance music gradually moved from the underground fringes to the foreground of the mainstream. Think of Darude’s unavoidable and seminal hit, “Sandstorm,” which became a crossover monster.

By the end of the 1990s, trance—like tech culture behind it—was experiencing a monumental boom in mainstream culture around the world. The superstar DJ, essentially birthed from the rave scene, continued growing in the trance scene to gargantuan scales, with DJ fees reaching absurd, unsustainable heights. But the superstar DJ market crashed at the end of the decade under its own enormous, top-heavy weight.

The mainstream moved on from trance in the early ‘00s—at least here in the States—and while still hugely popular throughout the ‘00s in America, it existed on the fringes in many ways. The trance festival circuit was healthy at this time, but some of the glut of the ‘90s still left a bad taste in some people’s mouths. That is, of course, until the emergence of EDM in the US around 2012, which turned mainstream American music on its head and included a trance renaissance we’re still enjoying.

Yet trance never went away. As the millennium turned, plenty of new jacks were ready to inject fresh blood into the scene. Above & Beyond—British threesome Jono Grant, Tony McGuinness, and Paavo Siljamäk—emerged at this time and haven’t looked back since. Tracks like their breakout “Volume 1” and “Air for Life” established them as new heavies in a scene the press had written off but would plow forward regardless. Helping keep the torch lit during this more dormant period, Above & Beyond’s radio show Trance Around the World lasted nearly a decade before turning millions of millennials on to this ever-evolving sound.

Trance was a utopic soundtrack to our tech-friendly, optimistic, increasingly globalized world at the end of the last century and is still a gateway sound for many to get into electronic music at all.
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ƒ=1/2π(√k/m)
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Whenever I hear this track in a mix I lose it... such a good hook.
I've never seen Ferry Tayle or Dan Stone live yet... need to.

 

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Trust In Trance
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780 Posts
Psytrance: The History of a Colourful Culture

(This is an exclusive preview from the fantastic GOABOOK.)






How it all started (written by DJ Chicago)






The beginning

Well, it all started in the Goa 1983-84 season, the first electronic „Goa’ music, that is…up until then, and through that season, we were tripping ‘n dancing all night to „normal’ music – -Talking Heads „Burning Down The House’, Billy Idol „White Wedding’ and „Rebel Yell’, The Cult „Born To Be Wild’, Tina Turner. But there were two „crossover’ traxx – -Sven Väth’s „Electrica Salsa’ (a-hah,a-hah) and the transvestite Divine’s „Step By Step’. They were the first electronic traxx and we all went crazy for them. They were played at almost every party, and created a very special electricity on the dancefloor.

The next season was only electronic dance music at all the parties, the tidal wave had hit! Then we called it „Techno Music’ for years as it used the modern new technology of synthesizers and computers. In the 90s, a new category of dance music emerged, called „Tekno’, a different style of electronic dance music. So we suddenly had to change the name of our music, from Techno it became „Trance’ music, also called Goatrance and Psychedelic/Psytrance). As Gil said, it was known as „Wave Music’, „Body Music’, „Euro Beat’. It was a super-high and halcyon time – a whole new world of music, and dancing – a whole new party experience opened up.



The magic

This was also the beginning of „dark’ music during the nights. There was a core-group of DJs who took control of the party scene (the legendary and magical French Laurent, who put together a full „story’ every party. He took you on a special journey of music and emotions. (French Fabian, Canadian Dr. Bobby, U.S. Gil and Swiss Rudy, to mention a few others), and insisted on a new concept for the night. Instead of just dancing under the moon and stars, having fun, the idea became to take a trip into and through the Dark Side through the night and be delivered into the Light in the morning, switching then to fun, happy, uplifting music – the „morning music’ concept was born.

Dr. Bobby also recently told me that yes, these DJs did have an unspoken contest between them at night, who could play the scariest and maddest music, with trax full of car crashes, people screaming, glass shattering, machine guns and explosions, beasts and monsters roaring etc. Personally, I and many others were against this, as many people were sensitive while tripping, and got totally freaked out. It led to many serious bad trips. Many of us just wanted to have fun tripping and dancing all night with our friends rather than having to go into the dark side. But we were not spared.

The mornings were sublime, wonderful uplifting music, full of emotions – we all remember crying in front of the speakers, tears of joy, with goosebumps, shivers…ecstasy – a strong feeling of one-ness and togetherness with each other and the magnificent nature surrounding us. It was most powerful! But that sweet, heart-touching kind of morning music is long-gone now – called „fluffy’ today, it is blast full-power right on through, from night through dawn through sunrise, no let-up, „take no prisoners’!

Until around 2000, there were parties every couple of nights all season long every winter in Goa, then also on Ibiza island every summer. Many of us for years (26 years for me, now) spent the winters partying in Goa, then everything shifted to Ibiza for the summers. What days they were – there was always a special atmosphere in the air, everyone getting ready for a party, the excitement building, then feeling so happy at the party, folowed by being so happily wasted for a couple of days after the party, and the cycle began again. What a magical existence!

And the parties were all free parties back then, it only cost a few 100 Dollars to stage a party, and there was no admission charge, and all the DJs played for free, just for the fun of it all. It wasn’t until the mid 90s that business-minded promoters came in, realizing that there was money to be made, and started charging admission fees and paying the DJs – the start of commercial parties in our scene.



The People

Goa was full of colourful characters in those days – Acid Eric, 8-Finger Eddie, Mescaline Bobby, Kenny Potter and The Birmingham Boys, Spanish Wildman Alejandro, Johnny Cairo, Pisco and lots of famous drug dealers and flamboyant characters. And it was all so free back then, especially for the drug scene, as India actually had no real drug laws all through the 80s. I think it was in 1989 when the USA forced all the Asian drug-countries – Thailand, Burma, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan – to enact new strict drug laws in exchange for billions in aid to them from the U.S. But, until then, we could merrily smoke and trip and mushroom and whatever just about anywhere, and especially at the parties – it was all legal then!

And there were no „no topless/nudity’ laws then, so every day at the beach many of us were naked, the girls topless, a fun smoking and tripping scene at all the beaches each day! Party all night, beach all day – life was a beach. The big bands in the 80s, there was Front 242, Nitzer Eb, Yello, Skinny Puppy and many others experimenting and forging new electronic sound-styles. In the 90s until now some of the major players were T.I.P./The Infinity Project (Raja Ram and Graham Wood), X-Dream, Juno Reactor, Eat Static, Man With No Name, Doof, Green Nuns of the Revolution, Astral Projection, Hallucinogen, Total Eclipse, GMS (Growling Mad Scientists), Infected Mushroom, Astrix, 1200 Micrograms, Eskimo. Each of these bands had their own special unique style, all producing a series of amazing traxx that conjured up extra-special vibrations and magical moments on the dancefloors all over the world.



The BPM Story

Until about the mid-90s, the beats per minute were much slower, 120 – 125 bpm was common through the 80s, and 140 was a fast track. Then in the early 90s there was a sudden switch, a big speed-up and suddenly 140 was a slow track and 145 became the ideal dancing bpm. Which is better? Well, below 140, you dance and move your body in a different way, more expressive. Some say it has more hip movement, a more fluid body motion. But there is a special power and dynamism in dancing at 145 bpm, a different excitement level than at the slower bpms. Both have their magic.







The SFX Years

Also around the same time as the bpms speeded up, it became a fashion for some years to make traxx with no melody features, instead using only sound-effects on the top of the bass’n’kick-drum bottoms. Producers who had no musical training could now come in, lay down a strong dancey bottom, and simply add a variety of SFX on the tops. Riktam and Bansi of GMS were the first DJs I heard play an entire set of only SFX traxx (late 90s) – not a single melodic track. And then it became a trend, a force, for about five years at the parties, it took over. But it ran its course, there are still some traxx like that now, but not like it was then.
From Hippie Dress To Fluoro

In the 80s, there were still people who hand-made special fantasy party outfits for every party, much of it hippie-inspired, flowing dresses, long scarfs, turbans and headgear, make-up. Then in the late 80s fluoro party clothes arrived on the scene, psychedelic patterns on synthetic leggings and tops – a whole new fashion line had started. It was everywhere, day and night and not just at the parties. It heightened the psychedelic atmosphere of our scene. But today these clothes are virtually gone, most people at the parties now just wear normal clothes. There are still a few of us holding out and wearing psy clothes – especially in Goa, but not in the rest of our Trance world.



The Hits

For almost the first 20 years, every season had „its hits’, killer traxx that were played at most parties and by most of the DJs, right through the season. DJs weren’t afraid to play them because other DJs were playing them, they all wanted to play these special traxx, because we all looked forward to these highlite traxx at every party. We all knew the names of these traxx and the bands that made them. Each time they were played they created an explosion of NRG, a special magic on the dancefloor. There are still some hits today that you hear fairly often, but now most DJs want to be unique and play traxx no-one else is playing. It was a bonding experience, our love for these hits helped create a sense of unity among the party goers. It’s sad this has been lost.

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Trust In Trance
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780 Posts
.....


Party Atmosphere Change

In the first ten years or so, the budget for every party included money for „lights’ as well as the sound system. Colorful „fairy-lights’ were draped in artistic ways over the dance floor, circled up the palm trees. This created a magical atmosphere and allowed everybody to see each other. So it was much more social through the night. Everyone could smile at each other, dance together, you could watch all the sexy girls and guys dancing and watch all the fun and action. But then the concept of the blacklight party came along. This especially accompanied the „dark music’, and a trip into „the dark side’. But it greatly changed the atmosphere. Now you only see people’s teeth and eyes glowing, it looks very weird and is much less social. You go more into your own private world on the dancefloor. And it’s much harder to find your friends…

So, that’s a brief „history’ of Goa and the party scene through my eyes. The glory-days of mad, wild, full-freedom, all-night „acid-parties’ in Goa are now gone, not being allowed anymore by the government. We were blessed to have had them all those years, what an amazing experience! But Goa and the Goa experience will go on. You still have dancing and partying going on every day, but only until 10 p.m., sometimes stretching until 11 or 12 p.m. But we always said that the parties were like the icing on the cake but „the cake’ – Goa itself – is still there, still magic, still wondrous, still very free compared to the rest of the world, still very open, still quite „experimental’, still so very international with like-minded people from all over the world – coming to an experience. It’s a special „alternative life-style’ for those of us who want to live a different way than the „normal-life’ way. And the beat goes on!




How I got into Psytrance (written by Raja Ram)






My Friend Paul kidnapped me from London and took me to his house in Anjuna Beach Goa for New Years Eve 1989. He said he was going to take me to a party in the jungle, starting at 4 o’clock in the morning to avoid the police. I objected being tired and old and I didn’t feel like doing anything. But he forced me into a taxi and we drove to the edge of a vast valley overlooking the Arabian sea. It was a marvellous full moon night, stars glittering in the dark, blue sky, and there in the distance we saw the lights and the dust down below. We headed on, carefully making our way down the slopes and arrived at an encampment of coconut trees and a dozen ladies serving chai on mats – and the music you could hear through the ground. I had never heard anything like it before – a new form of psy-disco?

Contemporary electronic dance music for adults coming out of the enormous speakers on the beach and the lights were black fluoro lit, paintings everywhere, string sculptures in all designs. The tree trunks were painted fluorescent and everything was glowing, while hundreds of dancers raised the dust, the spirits of all. The vibe was high, the music perfect, a new tribe had been formed gradually. Party people from all over the world wanting to find the sacred place together, the refuge of love and understanding and peace and joy through dance and friendship.

The music became God and we became the music. It was a spiritual ceremonial happening – the thing I had been secretly searching for all my life. The DJs – often incognito – played the latest far out sounds on the planet behind the decks. Everything was done and mixed on DAT tapes – that pre-technological breakthrough. Of course we wanted to know who made the music, where it was from, how did they make this music, did they create the music on drugs? These were all questions that became part of the musical spiritual detective hunt. We wanted to find out all about it and then eventually make it ourselves which is what happened later.

There were so many special people in Goa – you just had to be there. Goa Gil and 8-finger-Eddie, Acid Eric, Mushroom Jack. The names give an indication of our lifestyles. It was the golden era of Goa. Some years later it got worse when the police chased us. I got locked up in Jail after one party I had at my house on the beach. In the morning they fined me five pounds and we went home. But the parties were everything. The flaming torch had been lit and there was no turning back and so we had hundreds of all night gatherings and some day parties as well.

But who paid for them and who arranged the sound systems remained a mystery – some sort of human collective consciousness. And we bow to all those good souls who have passed on and salute all the great ones who still are with us. Fun rules and parties will never stop. There is one going on right now and I finish with the quote ‘Your body is a temple, but it is also a nightclub’. Rock on to the future, it’s just starting now – and aren’t we lucky?


Neither Raja or Chicago (1200 Micrograms) arent really my style, but i have so much respect for this two gentleman.
And as hard as Psychedelic Trance is to listen for regular person, everyone should visit at least once a good , true, underground party/festival, and spend at least a day/night. Europe, Johannesburg (South Africa anywhere really, they are huge on Psy with amazing parties), Goa, Israel....find a location somewhere in a desert, jungle, forest, on the beach....and enjoy.



Switzerland

 

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Trust In Trance
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780 Posts


Andre Visior - The Only One 00:00
Paul van Dyk & Alex M.O.R.P.H. - Voyager 03:15
Quadraphonic - I Can Feel Your Love (James Cottle Remix) 09:03
Alan Morris & Martin Drake - Elysium 13:55
Stargazers & Katty Heath - Be Here With Me 19:01
Bryan Kearney - Something Out Of Nothing 22:33
Playme - The Great Bay 26:23
Tycoos - Time Traveler 31:50
Steve Dekay - Krishna 35:05
Madwave & Exouler - Miracle 40:04
Mark Sherry & Scot Project pres. Gentech - Feel My Love 45:34
 

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Trust In Trance
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780 Posts
Purity of trance sound is on a such high level in this set. Absolutely beautiful. Waiting for this project in Chicago next month




Chicago started to host a lot of Trance projects lately. I already have tickets for Jordan Suckley (guy even does some Psy which makes me super excited), Ferry Tyle and Thrillseekers for the next few weeks. I pass on Ferry Corsten....way too soft and "diluted" trance.
 

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Trust In Trance
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780 Posts
This looks badass. Well, open air trance parties are the best parties out there :) And the music in the video is amazing.

I just checked the line up. It will be awesome party.Great names.

I have to say that i really like Simon Patterson. He was twice in Chicago last year. First time with Sean Tyas, second time with John Askew (and i see that all 3 of them will be playing there).First one with Sean was awesome because both of them were killing it. However, second time in December he was playing with John Askew and they were playing like back and forth - 30min each for like couple hours...and you could TOTALLY see/feel how much more powerful/energetic Simon is. Im not saying that John was bad, but just that the difference is so obvious that i didnt even have to look at the stage and i knew every time that Simon took over.And for my taste he is a lot better - powerful, energetic,fast(er), hard(er) rhythm, strong(er) bass line.


Mario, post some pic and possible videos if you attend the party.
 

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This looks badass. Well, open air trance parties are the best parties out there :) And the music in the video is amazing.

I just checked the line up. It will be awesome party.Great names.

I have to say that i really like Simon Patterson. He was twice in Chicago last year. First time with Sean Tyas, second time with John Askew (and i see that all 3 of them will be playing there).First one with Sean was awesome because both of them were killing it. However, second time in December he was playing with John Askew and they were playing like back and forth - 30min each for like couple hours...and you could TOTALLY see/feel how much more powerful/energetic Simon is. Im not saying that John was bad, but just that the difference is so obvious that i didnt even have to look at the stage and i knew every time that Simon took over.And for my taste he is a lot better - powerful, energetic,fast(er), hard(er) rhythm, strong(er) bass line.


Mario, post some pic and possible videos if you attend the party.

Well originally I wanted a week off but for the plane ticket price I would rather take 2 weeks but I'm in college this term as well as working. Tickets and resort is very cheap, plane ticket was $1600CAD round trip. But would have been a great time by the looks of it!
 
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