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I finished my valve seals and timing belt on my 93.5 TT Supra. Everything looked good until I noticed I accidentally forgot to correctly plug in one of the oil cooler lines that goes to the radiator and a lot of transmission oil was lost. I decided to do a drain and fill on the tranny since I was going to have to add transmission oil and thought it might be beneficial. I started with 2 quarts then ran the gears while the car was on as recommended to help the tranny oil circulate.
As I shifted up and down through reverse I noticed the transmission grinding. I got concerned. I then forgot and noticed that I had removed the passenger rear brakes and rotor which allowed the hub to spin freely as I shifted. My question is. Was the transmission grinding because the vehicle assumed the car was advancing forward then interrupted on reverse? Remember that I could not stop the rear passenger rotor because the brakes were uninstalled. Or is the transmission grinding as I go through reverse because it’s low on oil?
I managed to put in 4 quarts of oil and may need to drain at least one or one and a half.
My new concern now is that I see a transmission oil leak from underneath the transmission in the front area. Everything was working good with no issues before so I’m concerned why or where it’s coming from.
Does anyone have any ideas with what may be happening?
I’m addition, I also noticed the new passenger rotor does not go in flushed to the hub. I can see in one or two of the rotor holes that there is a bit of a gap compared to the other holes on the rotor. Is this normal? Do I maybe need to clean it and scrub off build up rust and grime? Sorry about the long question.
Thanks in advance.
 

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The only thing you can do at this point is reassemble the rear brakes and reinstall the wheel. Find some stock lug nuts and use those to torque down the rotor to see if it seats fully. If you don't have some spare stock lug nuts just install the wheel and torque to spec, and spin the wheel freely to ensure it rotates smoothly without any wobble. That will seat the new rotor unless that new rotor is not machined correctly.

On the transmission damage yes, it was not good for the transmission to shift through all those gears while it was spinning. But the good news is that instead of an entire car's mass beating up the transmission it was just the driveshaft and a single wheel hub. So all you can really do is get everything back together, repeat the process of topping off the transmission once the car is on the ground, and hope for the best.
 
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