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Discussion Starter #1
OK so after tons of research digging through old post on the Supra forums I came to the conclusion that the best boost controller to use with stock twins is blitz SBC i-D.

Please correct me if I’m wrong before I make this purchase. And post other options.

Also for the ones using this boost controller can you please note your settings.

1997 TT Auto
My mods:
1. Single air intake
2.3 inch Catless downpipe
4. 4 inch exhaust
5. Greddy bcc
6. Ets 4” intercooler 3/3 piping
7. Stock ECU
247797
 

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Chalo, I have almost the exact same BPU stuff as you on my car and did tons of research on EBCs. I recently bought a HKS EVC-6 IR (stepper motor). I think for the most part, any electronic boost controller will be fine, including solenoid-styles. My suggestion (at your own risk) is try to hook your boost controller up using the HKS 2JZ-specific hose routing and see if you like it. You will have to intercept some vacuum lines feeding the pressure tank and EBV.


It completely transforms the car into a street beast! (Even with the boost controller turned off!) I get 16PSI from the first turbo by around 3000 RPM, then when the second turbo kicks in around 4000 RPM, the tires break loose over 40+MPH. Pulls very hard and I have very little drop during the prespool and transition. My turbos are very healthy... for now, but they do run out of breath at the upper RPM range and boost drops till red-line. I may have some boost leaks from my t-band clamp IC hoses, but I'm rarely boosting all the way to red-line.

I don't know why this method was not wildly popular when everyone started buying EBCs for BPU cars, because it really does wake a stock BPU sequential car.

Here's another informative link from the epic "Max-Boost" sequencial tutorial explaining this method of controlling boost:

 

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handy with the steel
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When my car was bpu I used an HKS EVC-S and I was pleased with how it worked. Had two settings "A" and "B", which I used for low and high boost, but what I really liked was how small the control unit was. It didn't clutter up the dash with unnecessary junk.
 

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CD, very nice build in your sig. I would be interested in your impressions. I still haven't heard anyone using the new T56-F on the forums.

Chalo, don't forget you will need a boost cut controller to intercept the stock boost sensor. You can use the Greddy BCC or Suprastore boost signal limiter, or build your own voltage clamper with a handful of parts from digikey or mouser.
 

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handy with the steel
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Thanks. I wish I would have waited a year to do the T56 swap, bc I would have liked to have gotten the F version instead of the extended shifter version that I've got. That said, its 1000x better than the auto.

As for the power upgrades, I am just getting to started tuning, but even based on the small sample size it's a huge improvement over the stock twins. Builds boost quickly and pulls really hard.

By far my favorite upgrade is the M150. The tuning and data analysis software is super slick, intuitive, and powerful.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Chalo, I have almost the exact same BPU stuff as you on my car and did tons of research on EBCs. I recently bought a HKS EVC-6 IR (stepper motor). I think for the most part, any electronic boost controller will be fine, including solenoid-styles. My suggestion (at your own risk) is try to hook your boost controller up using the HKS 2JZ-specific hose routing and see if you like it. You will have to intercept some vacuum lines feeding the pressure tank and EBV.


It completely transforms the car into a street beast! (Even with the boost controller turned off!) I get 16PSI from the first turbo by around 3000 RPM, then when the second turbo kicks in around 4000 RPM, the tires break loose over 40+MPH. Pulls very hard and I have very little drop during the prespool and transition. My turbos are very healthy... for now, but they do run out of breath at the upper RPM range and boost drops till red-line. I may have some boost leaks from my t-band clamp IC hoses, but I'm rarely boosting all the way to red-line.

I don't know why this method was not wildly popular when everyone started buying EBCs for BPU cars, because it really does wake a stock BPU sequential car.

Here's another informative link from the epic "Max-Boost" sequencial tutorial explaining this method of controlling boost:

Thank you so much for your post.
 

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No problem, Chalo. Lot's of good people here just keeping this forum alive. I use it as a massive information archive.

Either one should work great. I got a brand new HKS EVC-6IR because the screen is nice/compact, it has tons of features (boost by gear, laptop tuning software), it's the relatively newest HKS product, and from previous threads, the stepper motor and 2JZ specific installation was alleged to be superior to alternative 2jZ boost-controlling methods. I tapped my WB O2 sensor into the EVC throttle position input so I can see AFR and boost at the same time on the EVC display.

Honestly, I haven't been able to precisely tune my EVC-6. I can't find a nearby road safe enough for high boost pulls and I don't want to rent dyno time just to setup a boost controller. Most of the time, my EVC is turned off because I like the way the car drives on the street. #1 full 16 PSI boost by 3000RPM and my max boost is 20-21ish for a short peak, then always comes back down to 18-19, which is close to what I would set the EVC-6 if it was turned on. I contribute this to my BPU setup and routing the wastegate VSV to control the EGV. (I also have the wastegate spring mod.) I did a writeup trying to figure out exactly how the EVC-6 worked and how to better control my boost.

There are too many variables with sequentials and each car may be a little different. My struggle is (was) spending $500+ on a EBC, which is around 1/4 of a standalone ECU, which I will want (need) sometime soon!

I would use caution when buying a used EBC, since the valves do have a useful lifespan or get clogged with grime. Stepper motors cannot be purchased separately, to my knowledge. Any EBC setup using the MAC 2 or 3 port solenoids can easily be replaced. And the simpler PID controllers are usually cheaper. Another good controller I considered was the GFB G-Force.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No problem, Chalo. Lot's of good people here just keeping this forum alive. I use it as a massive information archive.

Either one should work great. I got a brand new HKS EVC-6IR because the screen is nice/compact, it has tons of features (boost by gear, laptop tuning software), it's the relatively newest HKS product, and from previous threads, the stepper motor and 2JZ specific installation was alleged to be superior to alternative 2jZ boost-controlling methods. I tapped my WB O2 sensor into the EVC throttle position input so I can see AFR and boost at the same time on the EVC display.

Honestly, I haven't been able to precisely tune my EVC-6. I can't find a nearby road safe enough for high boost pulls and I don't want to rent dyno time just to setup a boost controller. Most of the time, my EVC is turned off because I like the way the car drives on the street. #1 full 16 PSI boost by 3000RPM and my max boost is 20-21ish for a short peak, then always comes back down to 18-19, which is close to what I would set the EVC-6 if it was turned on. I contribute this to my BPU setup and routing the wastegate VSV to control the EGV. (I also have the wastegate spring mod.) I did a writeup trying to figure out exactly how the EVC-6 worked and how to better control my boost.

There are too many variables with sequentials and each car may be a little different. My struggle is (was) spending $500+ on a EBC, which is around 1/4 of a standalone ECU, which I will want (need) sometime soon!

I would use caution when buying a used EBC, since the valves do have a useful lifespan or get clogged with grime. Stepper motors cannot be purchased separately, to my knowledge. Any EBC setup using the MAC 2 or 3 port solenoids can easily be replaced. And the simpler PID controllers are usually cheaper. Another good controller I considered was the GFB G-Force.
GFB- force does it have a stepping motor similar to HKS evc 6? I ask because it’s cheaper.

Also have you done the true twin turbo mod? Thanks
 

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No, GFB uses a MAC 3-port solenoid. It uses an effective and common PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) algorithm to control the duty cycle of the solenoid. That is why it is "cheaper". I do like it, though. From what I have heard, it's a good unit from a good company with a good reputation.

I have never done the TTC. Mainly because with the stock auto transmission and torque converter, I like the low-end torque off the line. (My old dyno graph showed 220lb-ft @ 3300RPM, stock 9 PSI pre-transition. With my new boost controlling config, I would not be surprised to see 280-300 ft-lb @ 3300 RPM or earlier, due to 16+PSI pre-transition. It pushes my head back into the seat from a dig.)

Although temporarily switching to TTC to tune the maximum desired boost for an EBC is probably the best method. I should try it sometime. Maybe I would like it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No, GFB uses a MAC 3-port solenoid. It uses an effective and common PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) algorithm to control the duty cycle of the solenoid. That is why it is "cheaper". I do like it, though. From what I have heard, it's a good unit from a good company with a good reputation.

I have never done the TTC. Mainly because with the stock auto transmission and torque converter, I like the low-end torque off the line. (My old dyno graph showed 220lb-ft @ 3300RPM, stock 9 PSI pre-transition. With my new boost controlling config, I would not be surprised to see 280-300 ft-lb @ 3300 RPM or earlier, due to 16+PSI pre-transition. It pushes my head back into the seat from a dig.)

Although temporarily switching to TTC to tune the maximum desired boost for an EBC is probably the best method. I should try it sometime. Maybe I would like it.
I’m auto as well. Good to know. I will now order the HKS EVC 6 and follow the instructions. If you have any tips or tricks on how to install it please let know. Thanks for all of your help
 

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No problem. I think you will like this unit. Let us know if you have any questions with the set-up, and we'll try to help. Maybe you will have better luck setting it the first couple times than I did.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Chalo, I have almost the exact same BPU stuff as you on my car and did tons of research on EBCs. I recently bought a HKS EVC-6 IR (stepper motor). I think for the most part, any electronic boost controller will be fine, including solenoid-styles. My suggestion (at your own risk) is try to hook your boost controller up using the HKS 2JZ-specific hose routing and see if you like it. You will have to intercept some vacuum lines feeding the pressure tank and EBV.


It completely transforms the car into a street beast! (Even with the boost controller turned off!) I get 16PSI from the first turbo by around 3000 RPM, then when the second turbo kicks in around 4000 RPM, the tires break loose over 40+MPH. Pulls very hard and I have very little drop during the prespool and transition. My turbos are very healthy... for now, but they do run out of breath at the upper RPM range and boost drops till red-line. I may have some boost leaks from my t-band clamp IC hoses, but I'm rarely boosting all the way to red-line.

I don't know why this method was not wildly popular when everyone started buying EBCs for BPU cars, because it really does wake a stock BPU sequential car.

Here's another informative link from the epic "Max-Boost" sequencial tutorial explaining this method of controlling boost:

I just purchased the HKS EVC 6 (used with no manual) do have any pointers/advice ? or where can I find the manual
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My apologies if you already know this stuff, but I'll break it down.

So here is where you need to decide how you wish to control your sequential boost. There are basically 3 ways:
1) Common: just intercept the wastegate boost signal. "Manual boost controller" method. #1 turbo will boost to stock level (9-ish PSI) then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

2) Common PLUS spring mod on EBV: Same as above BUT you install a 1/2" spacer or wrap a spring around the EBV actuator arm to boost #1 turbo to around 12-14 PSI, then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

3) THE HKS 2JZ-specific sequential boost control. From Japan. See the drawings. This method re-routes many vacuum hoses to allow the EVC6, EBV and wastegate to combine boost control of all turbos at the same time. #1 turbo will boost to 16-ish PSI (or max boost set by the EVC or transition, whichever happens first) then after the transition, final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

That first link I posted in this thread, "HKS EVC Help setup do I got it right" is what you should review for EVC-specific vacuum hose routing. It is not hard, but you will have to get under your car to reach the pressure tank. Just remove the transmission dip-stick, remove the dip-stick tube and bracket, jack up your car and it is easier to reach your hand in there. No big deal.

The PDF manual is online. Just do a search and HKS USA has additional support for the EVC6.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
My apologies if you already know this stuff, but I'll break it down.

So here is where you need to decide how you wish to control your sequential boost. There are basically 3 ways:
1) Common: just intercept the wastegate boost signal. "Manual boost controller" method. #1 turbo will boost to stock level (9-ish PSI) then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

2) Common PLUS spring mod on EBV: Same as above BUT you install a 1/2" spacer or wrap a spring around the EBV actuator arm to boost #1 turbo to around 12-14 PSI, then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

3) THE HKS 2JZ-specific sequential boost control. From Japan. See the drawings. This method re-routes many vacuum hoses to allow the EVC6, EBV and wastegate to combine boost control of all turbos at the same time. #1 turbo will boost to 16-ish PSI (or max boost set by the EVC or transition, whichever happens first) then after the transition, final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

That first link I posted in this thread, "HKS EVC Help setup do I got it right" is what you should review for EVC-specific vacuum hose routing. It is not hard, but you will have to get under your car to reach the pressure tank. Just remove the transmission dip-stick, remove the dip-stick tube and bracket, jack up your car and it is easier to reach your hand in there. No big deal.

The PDF manual is online. Just do a search and HKS USA has additional support for the EVC6.

Good luck!
Thank you so much.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My apologies if you already know this stuff, but I'll break it down.

So here is where you need to decide how you wish to control your sequential boost. There are basically 3 ways:
1) Common: just intercept the wastegate boost signal. "Manual boost controller" method. #1 turbo will boost to stock level (9-ish PSI) then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

2) Common PLUS spring mod on EBV: Same as above BUT you install a 1/2" spacer or wrap a spring around the EBV actuator arm to boost #1 turbo to around 12-14 PSI, then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

3) THE HKS 2JZ-specific sequential boost control. From Japan. See the drawings. This method re-routes many vacuum hoses to allow the EVC6, EBV and wastegate to combine boost control of all turbos at the same time. #1 turbo will boost to 16-ish PSI (or max boost set by the EVC or transition, whichever happens first) then after the transition, final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

That first link I posted in this thread, "HKS EVC Help setup do I got it right" is what you should review for EVC-specific vacuum hose routing. It is not hard, but you will have to get under your car to reach the pressure tank. Just remove the transmission dip-stick, remove the dip-stick tube and bracket, jack up your car and it is easier to reach your hand in there. No big deal.

The PDF manual is online. Just do a search and HKS USA has additional support for the EVC6.

Good luck!
So I just finish installing the bus controller but I have a question can you tell me what is two wires are for
My apologies if you already know this stuff, but I'll break it down.

So here is where you need to decide how you wish to control your sequential boost. There are basically 3 ways:
1) Common: just intercept the wastegate boost signal. "Manual boost controller" method. #1 turbo will boost to stock level (9-ish PSI) then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

2) Common PLUS spring mod on EBV: Same as above BUT you install a 1/2" spacer or wrap a spring around the EBV actuator arm to boost #1 turbo to around 12-14 PSI, then after transition, your final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

3) THE HKS 2JZ-specific sequential boost control. From Japan. See the drawings. This method re-routes many vacuum hoses to allow the EVC6, EBV and wastegate to combine boost control of all turbos at the same time. #1 turbo will boost to 16-ish PSI (or max boost set by the EVC or transition, whichever happens first) then after the transition, final boost will be controlled by the EVC6.

That first link I posted in this thread, "HKS EVC Help setup do I got it right" is what you should review for EVC-specific vacuum hose routing. It is not hard, but you will have to get under your car to reach the pressure tank. Just remove the transmission dip-stick, remove the dip-stick tube and bracket, jack up your car and it is easier to reach your hand in there. No big deal.

The PDF manual is online. Just do a search and HKS USA has additional support for the EVC6.

Good luck!
Just completed the install but I need your help ...this two wires in the picture go where?
 

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Were you able to download a PDF manual? Page 23 has the wiring diagram. Blue is throttle signal. White is speed/rpm. Looks like brown is one of the scramble wires. I did not use any od the scramble wires.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Were you able to download a PDF manual? Page 23 has the wiring diagram. Blue is throttle signal. White is speed/rpm. Looks like brown is one of the scramble wires. I did not use any od the scramble wires.
Yes I did, i rather leave it too. can please Send a screen shot of your settings .....I’m confused on using the “throttle Para” and a screen shot of your boost settings. below is a picture of what i currently set it at. Thanks again for all y0ur time
248240
 

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That is "throttle parameters". Close is 0% closed throttle, Open is 100% full throttle. It is scalable for the EVC page 8 data graph display. You don't need any of this unless you are using the boost-mapping and other advanced EVC stuff. You can hook up any 5v signal to the EVC throttle sensor wire and monitor it on your display. I have my Wide Band O2 sensor hooked up to it, so I can overlay my AFR and boost at the same time on the EVC page 8 datalog graph display page.

I use RPM instead of SPEED. The rest of your initial settings look correct. Now you can make some full-boost pulls with the EVC turned off to see what your maximum steady-state boost level for the "Std.Max Boost" on EVC page 5. You may get a really high boost spike after transit on, but DO NOT use that number for the "Std.Max Boost".

Always save your "ROM" settings when you make changes.

Have fun with your new boost!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
That is "throttle parameters". Close is 0% closed throttle, Open is 100% full throttle. It is scalable for the EVC page 8 data graph display. You don't need any of this unless you are using the boost-mapping and other advanced EVC stuff. You can hook up any 5v signal to the EVC throttle sensor wire and monitor it on your display. I have my Wide Band O2 sensor hooked up to it, so I can overlay my AFR and boost at the same time on the EVC page 8 datalog graph display page.

I use RPM instead of SPEED. The rest of your initial settings look correct. Now you can make some full-boost pulls with the EVC turned off to see what your maximum steady-state boost level for the "Std.Max Boost" on EVC page 5. You may get a really high boost spike after transit on, but DO NOT use that number for the "Std.Max Boost".

Always save your "ROM" settings when you make changes.

Have fun with your new boost!
what is “ROM”?
 
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