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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone please advise the best break in procedure for my engine, I’ll paste my build
In here!

BC camshafts require first start up at 2.5k revs for 20minutes to bed the camshafts in.

Manley pistons suggest highway driving, or 2000-3000miles on the street or one might racing on the track to seat the rings adequately.

So my question is what is the best option for my break in?

Obviously I will have a safe base map on Syvecs ecu, and on the first key turn I will hit 2.5k revs for 20minutes but it’s what to do after this. I do have access to a dyno where the car is sitting.


Repainted ported Head -
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Toss some cheap oil in it. Get it up to temp (run at 2500rpm if you want) and bleed out the coolant. Usually jack up the front to bleed the coolant system faster. Make sure the thermo cycles. Drain the oil, replace the filter, and put good synthetic in it weighted for your build. Drive the piss out of it. Only issue would be if you are breaking in a new clutch, try to use an old one and flywheel so you can load the engine properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Toss some cheap oil in it. Get it up to temp (run at 2500rpm if you want) and bleed out the coolant. Usually jack up the front to bleed the coolant system faster. Make sure the thermo cycles. Drain the oil, replace the filter, and put good synthetic in it weighted for your build. Drive the piss out of it. Only issue would be if you are breaking in a new clutch, try to use an old one and flywheel so you can load the engine properly.
Yeah new spec stage 3+ clutch is in. Original dmf


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After getting the first full warmup and heat cycle done as Signalpuke suggested, I make sure my first drive keeps the revs moving up or down, and especially lots of engine braking from 4-5krpm down to 3k ish to help seat the rings.
But overall, if the tolerances and specs were all set correctly the engine will break in nicely almost no matter what you do. And if the machine work is off or other things are screwed up, some obsessive perfect magic break in procedure won't save the engine from itself.

Avoid any unicorn jizz 'break in' oils and all that crap, too. Regular conventional oil in the proper viscosity for your tolerances is all you need.

I prefer to go thinner on the cold spec for first startups to ensure speedy oil circulation on that crucial cold start. So if your engine is spec'd for say, 10w30, I try to find 0w30 or 5w30 for that first startup and heat cycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After getting the first full warmup and heat cycle done as Signalpuke suggested, I make sure my first drive keeps the revs moving up or down, and especially lots of engine braking from 4-5krpm down to 3k ish to help seat the rings.
But overall, if the tolerances and specs were all set correctly the engine will break in nicely almost no matter what you do. And if the machine work is off or other things are screwed up, some obsessive perfect magic break in procedure won't save the engine from itself.

Avoid any unicorn jizz 'break in' oils and all that crap, too. Regular conventional oil in the proper viscosity for your tolerances is all you need.

I prefer to go thinner on the cold spec for first startups to ensure speedy oil circulation on that crucial cold start. So if your engine is spec'd for say, 10w30, I try to find 0w30 or 5w30 for that first startup and heat cycle.
Hi mate. Thanks for the reply. I’ve got millers running in oils.

My plan was to start the engine, take it up to 2.5k for 20mins for the camshafts then do 100miles on the dyno keepin it in the range of 2k-5k using engine breaking. Then change the oil and filter again before doing a further 400miles on the road.

I’ve got a few roads to choose from, either country roads or carriage ways. Just not sure how to do this part correctly.

When that is done I will drop the oil again and put proper race oil in and drive to get it tuned and mapped properly.
 

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Absolutely no need for 100 miles on the dyno or 400 miles on the road. That's a great way to circulate break-in oil for too long.
If you're doing the 2500 rpm for 20 minutes thing, I'd just take it for a short 10-20 mile jaunt on a road where you can do lots of lower RPM full throttle and engine braking that keeps it mostly out of boost and below 4500-5k rpm. Get back from that drive, change the oil and filter to what you want, and then get it mapped on the dyno or whatever. From that point the only reason to take it easy is clutch break-in.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Absolutely no need for 100 miles on the dyno or 400 miles on the road. That's a great way to circulate break-in oil for too long.
If you're doing the 2500 rpm for 20 minutes thing, I'd just take it for a short 10-20 mile jaunt on a road where you can do lots of lower RPM full throttle and engine braking that keeps it mostly out of boost and below 4500-5k rpm. Get back from that drive, change the oil and filter to what you want, and then get it mapped on the dyno or whatever. From that point the only reason to take it easy is clutch break-in.
Thanks mate. Appreciate the advise and will take it on board mate
 

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Low-rpm full throttle ? In Supra-land doesn't that land you right into boost within seconds ?

Ah, maybe in a higher gear so the engine is lugging a bit at lower rpm. Full throttle and it will take a while to build boost, back before boost hits.
 

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Low-rpm full throttle ? In Supra-land doesn't that land you right into boost within seconds ?

Ah, maybe in a higher gear so the engine is lugging a bit at lower rpm. Full throttle and it will take a while to build boost, back before boost hits.
Precisely. Load and engine braking to seat the rings, not avoiding boost entirely but just ensuring it's minimized.
 

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I've done most of what's being suggested, but it is so much easier, and safer, on a dyno (motoman method). IMO, idling a new motor is like the kiss of death, and there's too much chance of that is SoCali traffic no matter how well planned your route is. On a dyno, you can do all that's recommended and be done in about an hour if you're slow.


Ken.
 
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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I've done most of what's being suggested, but it is so much easier, and safer, on a dyno (motoman method). IMO, idling a new motor is like the kiss of death, and there's too much chance of that is SoCali traffic no matter how well planned your route is. On a dyno, you can do all that's recommended and be done in about an hour if you're slow.


Ken.
Just looked up the motoman method on the dyno.

Which is what I will do as it sounds good but a few things are left out.

should I still run the engine at 2.5k prior to the motoman break in?

He mentions warming the engine up completely but this wouldn’t be on idle would it?

Also in between the 3 dyno runs he says to do, he mentions to cool the engine for 15minutes which I assume is not a idle cool down? So what way do you cool it? Engine off in between?

How long should the runs be he specify a to do?

After the three cycles are done is it a case of dropping running in oil and going straight to mapping and tuning and enjoying?

Quite a few questions left to answer


 

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Just looked up the motoman method on the dyno.

Which is what I will do as it sounds good but a few things are left out.

should I still run the engine at 2.5k prior to the motoman break in?

He mentions warming the engine up completely but this wouldn’t be on idle would it?

Also in between the 3 dyno runs he says to do, he mentions to cool the engine for 15minutes which I assume is not a idle cool down? So what way do you cool it? Engine off in between?

How long should the runs be he specify a to do?

After the three cycles are done is it a case of dropping running in oil and going straight to mapping and tuning and enjoying?

Quite a few questions left to answer


I like the Motoman method if you've got access to the dyno right at first engine start. I agree with Ken that excessive idling at first start is a bad idea. To that end, the idle period is usually just long enough to inspect for leaks/issues and to ensure the oil temperature is brought up into the proper operating range - I like 130-140* F at a minimum before I start going hard on an engine. I wouldn't worry about coolant temp or the thermostat opening if you did the Motoman method, just do the basic checks to ensure there's no leaks or issues, wait until the oil temps hit that range, then follow that procedure on the dyno. Use the 15 minute cooldown periods to inspect everything. This is one case where an old school above-ground dyno is really nice because you can look at everything under the car while it's still strapped down.

Yes, change the oil and filter immediately after the Motoman process before you begin the full mapping procedure. A filter change and oil top off after the tuning session isn't a bad idea either.

I would not do the 2500rpm stuff at all, honestly, as BC is the only camshaft manufacturer I'm aware of that recommends that style of break in for a DOHC flat tappet cam. I have personally overseen or assembled dozens of built Japanese DOHC engines, many with BC cams and components too, and we've never done that as a break-in procedure and almost all of those engines were built with a warranty.
In my opinion, if you simply installed BC camshafts into an already broken-in motor that wouldn't be bad for anything, but if we're talking about a wholly newly assembled longblock with new bearings/pistons/rings etc I would strongly emphasize proper bottom end/piston/ring break-in over anything else, really.
 

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Yeah, if you can find a loaded dyno operator that will let you break in your build, go for it. It's going to be expensive though, people don't like tearing up their chassis dynos doing stuff like that. Then if something spills, mechanical issues, whatever it is, it will all be rolled up in the dyno hourly rate. They're right though, temp is everything, and the engine builder should know that. If they're aren't the ones breaking in the engine, then have them contact whoever is.
Don't bother trying to break in a fresh build in the dead of winter. There is some assumed common sense when it comes to these things. Like the traffic in SoCal, I'd expect most of this is done in the middle of the night during the summer when the temps are nice and the traffic is minimal. Where I'm at we have a stop light prior to a nice hill that we can just run up and down for a while beating it in and traffic is at a minimum most of the day.
 

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I'm thinking breaking in new engines on the dyno is more common than you think. The three SoCali Supra-centric shops, and the SF Supra-building members in San Diego I'm familiar with, all break in new motors on the dyno and tune the cars as well.

Now, I will note that the shop that has broken in my motors also built them, although I've been there plenty of times when other shops without a dyno, and magazines conducting testing, rented the dyno for their purposes. For my money, and done correctly, it's the most effective, safest, most efficient way to break in (and tune) a new engine.


Ken.
 

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The main thing is load. I understand if a shop is getting some publicity in a magazine (or instagram etc), but most shops won't do this.
I know I'm brief, but the biggest issue I've seen of 'break in' is when the motor was built by 'machine shop', and was installed by 'speed shop' and now 'tuner shop' has the car.
This is real life. From a biz standpoint, customers are cheap. They want it all for nothing. They will shop around, and the shops don't always talk to each other.
It's rare that you get a customer that will drop 50k for a chassis up 800whp+ build to be done in house. It happens, but that is the minority.
Often it is a rebuild by a machine shop, sent to a rebuilding shop, that sends it to a tuning shop. People aren't in the loop. By the time it's back together, no one is tossing that on a dyno. That's a liability.
 

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I think you and I run in different shop circles. I'll leave it at that.


Ken.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah, if you can find a loaded dyno operator that will let you break in your build, go for it. It's going to be expensive though, people don't like tearing up their chassis dynos doing stuff like that. Then if something spills, mechanical issues, whatever it is, it will all be rolled up in the dyno hourly rate. They're right though, temp is everything, and the engine builder should know that. If they're aren't the ones breaking in the engine, then have them contact whoever is.
Don't bother trying to break in a fresh build in the dead of winter. There is some assumed common sense when it comes to these things. Like the traffic in SoCal, I'd expect most of this is done in the middle of the night during the summer when the temps are nice and the traffic is minimal. Where I'm at we have a stop light prior to a nice hill that we can just run up and down for a while beating it in and traffic is at a minimum most of the day.
As i said in the original post I have full access to a dyno to break the engine in
 

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The main thing is load. I understand if a shop is getting some publicity in a magazine (or instagram etc), but most shops won't do this.
I know I'm brief, but the biggest issue I've seen of 'break in' is when the motor was built by 'machine shop', and was installed by 'speed shop' and now 'tuner shop' has the car.
This is real life. From a biz standpoint, customers are cheap. They want it all for nothing. They will shop around, and the shops don't always talk to each other.
It's rare that you get a customer that will drop 50k for a chassis up 800whp+ build to be done in house. It happens, but that is the minority.
Often it is a rebuild by a machine shop, sent to a rebuilding shop, that sends it to a tuning shop. People aren't in the loop. By the time it's back together, no one is tossing that on a dyno. That's a liability.
You're absolutely right about how cheap some customers can be. I learned that the hard way with my time in the industry and we had customers that I wish I'd given $100 and asked to go somewhere else.

But customers that pay the high price for consistently good outcomes aren't as much of a minority as you may think. Also, having managed a shop that had two in ground dynos with an in house tuner and dyno operator, I know that it was easy to leave 'white space' on the dyno schedule but if a customer didn't show, or nobody was scheduled, it was an easy thing to drop a car on the dyno for an engine break-in when that was believed necessary. But we also had several large nearby roads that were especially open later in the evening, and we did plenty of engine break-in laps after 8pm as we worked late into the night getting stuff done. Sure, it was a bitch when dynos have issues but that was half the fun of having two dynos, one could be down waiting on parts while the other was just fine.

As far as excessive wear/abuse of a dyno, that's really an issue when you're pushing dyno speeds above 120-140mph or so, and especially for extended periods of time. One can do the Motoman dyno break in procedure in 3rd gear and never exceed 120-130mph, and since one avoids use of the dyno brake, it's less wear overall on the dyno than most tuning sessions.
 

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If you have billet cams, I would highly recommend following the break in procedure. I watched a local owner destroy his cams because he did not follow the procedure. They were installed by a well known Supra builder, so it was not an installation error.

This does not apply to the traditional cast cams.
 
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