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Discussion Starter #1
Yes, I am aware there are other methods for tightening the crank pulley bolt. But for the sake of this discussion, I will be using the chain wrench method.

As the title says, my crank pulley has failed, although not catastrophically like on some cars. I noticed my serpentine belt actually is behind the outer pulley ring because the ring is working itself off the hub of the crank pulley. Thankfully I caught it now.

I have installed a crank pulley before on another car using a chain wrench on the outer pulley ring. I used the old serpentine belt to protect the pulley grooves from being damaged by the chain wrench. I then used my torque wrench and held the chain wrench in my left hand and the torque wrench in my right hand and gave the crank pulley bolt all the torque I could. It has held up fine for 8 years.

However, I used a crank pulley that was smaller than the OEM pulley for the Supra so this time I need a larger chain wrench to hold the OEM pulley during installation. The chain wrench I have is too small for the OEM pulley.

So, who has used the chain wrench method that can tell me what size chain wrench do I need for the OEM pulley?

Brand and part # would be fantastic.

Thanks for any help.
 

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Master Shit Fixer
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You must have massive arms to put 239 ftlbs of torque on the crank bolt using just your arms in opposition. If you're going to buy a tool anyway, why not buy the correct tool to hold the pulley? Schley 64300.
 

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You must have massive arms to put 239 ftlbs of torque on the crank bolt using just your arms in opposition. If you're going to buy a tool anyway, why not buy the correct tool to hold the pulley? Schley 64300.

For sure! When I put my motor together I bent the bolts I was using on the backside of the crank when I torqued it
 

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1/2 " air gun tight w/ blue lock-tite. Blip, blip & good enough. You guys are ridiculous w/ this stuff.
 

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Master Shit Fixer
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I trust in the torque (specs).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a Milwaukee Fuel M18 1/2" impact wrench #2763-20.
254050


Do you guys think it can handle that crank pulley?

I hope I don't need to remove the radiator. Using the Milwaukee, will there be enough room with only the fan and shroud removed?
 

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iSPOOL
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It's so much easier if you remove the radiator and fan shroud.
 
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Do you guys think it can handle that crank pulley?

I hope I don't need to remove the radiator. Using the Milwaukee, will there be enough room with only the fan and shroud removed?
As mentioned radiator will have to come out if using an impact. Take the whole assembly out together - radiator/shroud.

Installation, yes that gun will handle it. Go wide open for 10 seconds with all it's got. New bolt, no locktite. Anti-seize.

Removal, doubtful. I've never had an impact remove that bolt. Or maybe just one time. That bolt seems to get really stuck on there for some reason. That's why I said no locktite.

Al
 

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Master Shit Fixer
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I have a Milwaukee Fuel M18 1/2" impact wrench #2763-20.

Do you guys think it can handle that crank pulley?

I hope I don't need to remove the radiator. Using the Milwaukee, will there be enough room with only the fan and shroud removed?
The impact wrench might remove the crank pulley bolt, but there are 3 issues with that:
  1. You have to remove the radiator, as others have said.
  2. If you use it to reinstall the crank pulley bolt, you'll never know how much torque you've applied. Did you overtorque it? Did you undertorque it?
  3. You risk turning your engine backwards, which is not a good idea...ever, trying to remove the bolt.
For these reasons, it's better to just use a breaker bar (plus possibly a pipe or jack handle to extend it) and Schley 64300 for removal, and a good torque wrench with a 250 ftlb range and Schley 64300 for reinstallation. Autozone will loan you the breaker bar and torque wrench if you don't have one that size.
 
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I've seen the Schley tool roll the key the crankshaft & crack the left side of the key way. Your holding the pulley in place w/ the tool & cranking on the bolt w/ breaker bar & jack handle extension for leverage. The key way is the only thing keeping the pulley from spinning & is not designed for that kind of stress. The crank bolt gets frozen & the
torque to loosen it can easily exceed 2x's the spec. This happened to 1 2J SC & 3 V6 Camrys before I stopped using that tool. At that point you might as well jam the
breaker bar under the right side frame rail & hit the ignition key to crank/ tap the engine over. View this as good or bad advice, but real world gotta get it fixed now advice.
A little heat w/ a torch & air gun are still #1 in my book.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've seen the Schley tool roll the key the crankshaft & crack the left side of the key way. Your holding the pulley in place w/ the tool & cranking on the bolt w/ breaker bar & jack handle extension for leverage. The key way is the only thing keeping the pulley from spinning & is not designed for that kind of stress. The crank bolt gets frozen & the
torque to loosen it can easily exceed 2x's the spec.
You have made a sensible point. One I overlooked until now. Thank you for your post. I can now visualize what you have illustrated here. You said, "The key way is the only thing keeping the pulley from spinning & is not designed for that kind of stress."

Perhaps this is why my Nephew's 7MGE 91 Supra had a bad key way and he sold the car as a result. The key way could have been damaged in the way you describe and eventually gave loose causing the crank nose to spin inside the crank pulley.

But, what about holding the flywheel inplace instead, won't that be distributing the rotational force that the key way is receiving? In other words, as I turn my breaker bar counterclockwise, the crank will be forced in the counterclockwise direction. Holding the flywheel in place should resist the force of rotation thereby keeping that tremendous amount of force off the the keyway. And holding the flywheel should eliminate the need for the Schley tool altogether, right?
 

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In theory you are correct, but if you chip a flywheel tooth you facked. You could try the not so 'correct' approach & tap the engine over w/ a breaker bar on the crank bolt. BUT after every tap chit goes flying & could damage something. It's just easier to bite the bullet & pull the radiator.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
It's just easier to bite the bullet & pull the radiator.
I went out to the car with my Milwaukee and a socket attached to it just to see if there would be room if I remove the radiator. There is not enough clearance. It looks like I would have to also move the A/C condenser as well.

I assume that using any kind of adapter like a U-joint on the Milwaukee impact wrench is not acceptable on that crank bolt.

Supra Dr, how long is your impact wrench?
 

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I removed both of the bolts I've done on 2J's with the Schley 64300 with an extention and a big breaker bar. I found the key on my GTE motor to have damaged the keyway on the crank. I figured this was misfiring as I had bad coils and oil in the ECU connector. Makes more sense now I'm thinking about it that it was the removal process that damaged it.

The damage to the keyway was filed down so the pulley and balancer fit once again, but a little more damage and it may not be recoverable.

Don't use an extention on the impact if you can avoid, it adds flex to the setup and you're losing torque/impact strength.
 
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