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Hey guys,

I was thinking about rolling my fenders, but I don't want to risk cracking my paint. So I want to know if this method will work....Make a lot of little cuts close together, and bend them upwards with a tack hammer.

Will this work? It should keep the integrety of the fender since the welds will still be in place, I think. Opinions?

Eric
 

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I think it sounds like a good idea........sounds a bit more tedious than just rolling them but it seems like it should work out fine, I am however no expert :)
 

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Eric the idea of it sounds like it would work but it still leaves many chances of the paint cracking on you. Your best bet is to not cut any corners and do it right the first time by picking up a heat gun.
 
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Either take it to a professional body shop that has rolled fenders, OR go to Eastwood Co. and purchase one of their fender rolling tools. This tool works great; it mounts on the wheel hub and ensures the job is done properly. Even a professional body shop will use a razor blade to cut the paint prior to rolling the fenders. If this is NOT done, the paint will crack, and you will be left with a potential mess. Why cut corners? You would never catch me doing this on my own, and I've done some minor bodywork in the past. A heatgun improves your chances of success only slightly.

Take the car to someone who knows what they are doing....this is just my opinion.....I've had fenders rolled on a couple of my cars at a professional body shop.....I couldn't be happier with the results.

KZ
 

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I have rolled fenders using that method. It works well, with minimal amount of paint cracking. I still prefer using a cutoff wheel and just taking the lip out almost completely, no chipped paint and when you are done just sand the edges with a sander disc and remove all the sharp edges for a clean look.

Lawrence
 

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^^

Make sure they are a reputable shop and ask for any satisfaction guarantee's etc...I have heard of too many horror stories regarding body-shops...
 

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Will do. I'm gonna call around tomorrow. I'll know my answer for sure whether they ask me "what is rolling a fender" or if they say "yes we've done several before" ;)
 

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I had that little lip cut out or rolled if that's what you call it and the paint on the outside of the fender shows no sign of work done on the inside.
 

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Bebop, we did the exact thing on one of my fenders and it worked out ok. The paint still cracked a bit but nothing a little clear nail polished couldnt handle.
 

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I had a guy roll my fenders with the fender rolling tool. He heated up the paint before rolling the fenders. I has been almost 1 year since I had it done and the paint is holding up fine.

carlo
 

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Could someone Please post some high resolution pics of the fender area which has been cut?

I'd like to print it out and show it to some shops and see if they can do it or not.
 

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I recommend rolling the fenders. You get more room than cutting and you don't have to worry about losing the welds, etc. The place I had it done heated the paint to avoid cracking and used the actual rolling tool (not a baseball bat). It came out great! All I have to do now is apply some body sealer to keep water from getting in there and I'm in business.
 

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Just cut it and be done with it......rather cut then take a chance of cracking paint. Just after you cut it smooth it out and paint it or spray some undercoating on it.
 
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Use your noggin my friend. Take it to a body shop that has experience in doing this work. Do not cut anything or make little cuts and increase the number of potential spots where rust can start forming (yes touch-up paint would fix this). You should not need to cut ANYTHING. The area is heated, and a special tool is used to roll the fender to ensure there is a consisten roll over the radius of the fender lip. FYI, the "correct tool" is NOT a baseball bat, rubber mallet, or anything of the sort. Check out Eastwood and see what there fender rolling tool looks like. Then, due to lack of experience, call a reputable shop to do the work for you.
 
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