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Looked into the DBB Stage 2 a lot and really like the whole kit. My question is when discussing it with a few guys they said the DBB turbos have a short lifespan 2yrs max on a street and light track car.

What are your thoughts on this? How long do they DBB turbos last?

Thanks for all your help in advance!

Best,
Greg
 

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wheresursfl said:
Looked into the DBB Stage 2 a lot and really like the whole kit. My question is when discussing it with a few guys they said the DBB turbos have a short lifespan 2yrs max on a street and light track car.

What are your thoughts on this? How long do they DBB turbos last?

Thanks for all your help in advance!

Best,
Greg
The DBB turbos are nice, but because the added bearings create more friction, the bearings are constantly satured in more heat as a result. There is no set lifespan for them, but yes you will have to rebuild them more often than standard bearing turbos. I personally prefer standard bearing turbos, because they are not as difficult to install or work with compared to DBB versions. With DBB you have to add water cooling and make sure you run a restrictor on the inlet or they can smoke like crazy. The spool up is nice, but our standard bearing units have got so good in recent years, its hardly noticeable.

Thanks
JH
 

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Do all your DBB models required an oil restrictor?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the response!

I understand the extra work involved in installing the DBB but i really like everything i hear about.

Whats is the comparison in lag? The DBB's spool up around 500 revs faster?
 

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I wasn't aware that DBB crap out faster... Then why the hell are they more money. Everyone raves about them. After reading this post I would probably no be going with one.
 

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Bullseye said:
Do all your DBB models required an oil restrictor?
Yes, all DBB turbos require an oil restrictor to keep the oil from backing up and out the exhaust side.

Thanks
JH
 

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wheresursfl said:
Thanks for the response!

I understand the extra work involved in installing the DBB but i really like everything i hear about.

Whats is the comparison in lag? The DBB's spool up around 500 revs faster?
Hard to say, they are quicker spool up, but on a dyno with no load its very hard to compare directly. I would say more like 300 RPM or so compared to std bearing turbos.

The Jet plane sound they make is way cool though!

Thanks
JH
 

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8secsupra said:
Yes, all DBB turbos require an oil restrictor to keep the oil from backing up and out the exhaust side.

Thanks
JH
Hmmmm, I asked this question after buying my stage one last year and this was your reply:

We no longer include a restrictor with the DBB turbos since the latest revision from ITS has a better oil control system internally. We used to restrict down the oil entering the turbo with a .050" restrictor, but have had no issues as of the last year. If you have any problems, just email me.

Thanks
Jarrett H.
 

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Jarrett,

Can I assume you are using ITS BB turbos exclusively? Have you tried Garrett units? If you have, did they ever fail? Under what conditions?

I don't mean to put you on the spot, but I have to believe there is a difference between BB's designed by an independant aftermarket company and the largest turbocharger company in the world. All the things I have learned about Garrett BB's is that they are more reliable than their journal bearing counterparts. They offer higher thrust load capability, and are less prone to bearing failure assuming clean oil.

Daniel
 

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Bullseye said:
Hmmmm, I asked this question after buying my stage one last year and this was your reply:

We no longer include a restrictor with the DBB turbos since the latest revision from ITS has a better oil control system internally. We used to restrict down the oil entering the turbo with a .050" restrictor, but have had no issues as of the last year. If you have any problems, just email me.

Thanks
Jarrett H.
I finally decided to revise the oil inlet kit for our turbo systems to include a .040" restrictor on ALL kits, not just DBB ones. This way, there is no chance of anything ever happening from too much oil flow. It was a simple decision, we make most of our fittings in-house anyhow, so why not do it.

Thanks

JH
 

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SupraWood said:
Jarrett,

Can I assume you are using ITS BB turbos exclusively? Have you tried Garrett units? If you have, did they ever fail? Under what conditions?

I don't mean to put you on the spot, but I have to believe there is a difference between BB's designed by an independant aftermarket company and the largest turbocharger company in the world. All the things I have learned about Garrett BB's is that they are more reliable than their journal bearing counterparts. They offer higher thrust load capability, and are less prone to bearing failure assuming clean oil.

Daniel
Have tried the Garrett units and the ITS units, have some troubles from each, but for the most parts both brands are pretty good overall. I still prefer standard bearing turbos for most applications unless its a very high boost car, or full race car. That is, until someone can prove the DBB really do make any difference on the Supra. I have not found that to be true over the past 10 years however.

Thanks
JH
 

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Jarrett,

I appreciate the response, but you have to admitt it was very general. I have heard of numerous people failing ITS bb's very early in life. I have not heard of such a specific instance with Garrett units. If you have experianced such a thing I would love to get some details about it. I respect your opinion, but I would like to really understand what you have done to bring you to these conclusions.

Thanks again,
Daniel
 

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SupraWood said:
Jarrett,

I appreciate the response, but you have to admitt it was very general. I have heard of numerous people failing ITS bb's very early in life. I have not heard of such a specific instance with Garrett units. If you have experianced such a thing I would love to get some details about it. I respect your opinion, but I would like to really understand what you have done to bring you to these conclusions.

Thanks again,
Daniel
So whats up with this?? Conclusions?? I'm turbo shopping and I thinK I wanna go DBB but idk cuz of all the bad things I do read about them. I know ppl however whos dealt with DBB turbos and has went through 1 over 9 years.. the one he used to replace this 1 is still in good working condition... Can anyone put this to rest on this issue bout the DBB turbo??
 

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Well, the primary reason I am pushing for evidence from Jarrett on Garrett DBBs is because, unlike any others in the aftermarket, these were developed and used in production applications. This meanse much worse abuse than any of us will ever put it through....think about a diesel city bus. So, I have trouble believing that a properly setup Garrett unit is going to fail in our application. But, I don't have the experience Jarrett does...so, I am very interested to hear what he has used and done to destroy these.

Daniel
 

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Storm70 said:
So whats up with this?? Conclusions?? I'm turbo shopping and I thinK I wanna go DBB but idk cuz of all the bad things I do read about them. I know ppl however whos dealt with DBB turbos and has went through 1 over 9 years.. the one he used to replace this 1 is still in good working condition... Can anyone put this to rest on this issue bout the DBB turbo??
Again, its hard to say exactly if one is better than the other. I have used both, and personally I prefer non ball bearing turbos. All ball bearing turbos require water cooling and oil feeds, making a much more complex install to get it right. OEM's use water cooled ball bearing turbos all the time, just look at the stock Toyota units. However, they were never designed to run at 30 psi either and we've seen what happens when you try. The newer dual ball bearing units from ITS were touchy in the beginning, but some changes have been made and the units seem to be working quite well now in many applications. Having come directly from Garrett, the owner of ITS and the designer of the dual ball bearing system, Rick Head, has experience in the use and operation of both. He found the problems with the single ball bearing units, and built an upgrade to serve both OEM's and high performance aftermarket applications. I would think if anyone knew of failures of the single ball bearing units from the inside, it would be Rick.

Bottom line is, if you want a dual ball bearing turbo, go for it. It wont necessarily add any lifetime to the turbo or a great deal of response, but they can be good in some applications. To each their own here.

Thanks
JH
 

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8secsupra said:
Again, its hard to say exactly if one is better than the other. I have used both, and personally I prefer non ball bearing turbos. All ball bearing turbos require water cooling and oil feeds, making a much more complex install to get it right. OEM's use water cooled ball bearing turbos all the time, just look at the stock Toyota units. However, they were never designed to run at 30 psi either and we've seen what happens when you try. The newer dual ball bearing units from ITS were touchy in the beginning, but some changes have been made and the units seem to be working quite well now in many applications. Having come directly from Garrett, the owner of ITS and the designer of the dual ball bearing system, Rick Head, has experience in the use and operation of both. He found the problems with the single ball bearing units, and built an upgrade to serve both OEM's and high performance aftermarket applications. I would think if anyone knew of failures of the single ball bearing units from the inside, it would be Rick.

Bottom line is, if you want a dual ball bearing turbo, go for it. It wont necessarily add any lifetime to the turbo or a great deal of response, but they can be good in some applications. To each their own here.

Thanks
JH
thank you..
 
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