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90T
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When I did my refresh a while back I could not find large Viton hoses and even the small ones had thin walls not generally suitable for vacuum. Can you tell us your source?
 

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McMaster! It's been forever, so I'm sure I can't find my old order. I will guess I bought the 3/8"ID 5/8"OD size, but verify that. I bought one foot and cut it to length. Somewhere I probably still have the leftover piece, since I'm a total pack rat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #243 ·
I'll check what they gave me later today. I went to NAPA's commercial shop as in our town everyone's been out of 1/8" vacuum hose and they were the only place in town. I notice for the water lines from the ISC to the manifold and also to the throttle body the product is marked 'Ford auto tranny coolant line' or something so it's a pretty high spec to deal with the high heat down there, and I'd expect what they chose for my PCV lines to be similarly high spec. They know me by name as I've been one of their highest volume personal DIY customers for 25 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #244 ·
Allright! The wiring harness is on the engine and everything on the left side of the engine is connected. All the vacuum lines on the entire engine are also new, so if the thing won't start I won't be holding my head in my hands wondering which hose is buried and leaking under there. I got some help from the forum confirming where the thick wire bundle drops through the intakes, and next I'll get the other side's wires connected. Much simpler on that side as mfrs try not to put things near the exhaust manifold when they have a choice. So that should be 10 minutes, and if I can't sleep I'm going back out...

Here's a reference photo if it helps others one day. My notes are removed and that VSV hanging from its vacuum lines is now zip tied high up out of sight. Could not find where it's bracket bolted on. The brown connector halfway visible straight to the right (rearward) of the motor mount had me scratching my head. Nothing on the lower fender. Nothing on the bottom of the firewall. No place left to connect it to a sensor within reach. Finally, I realized the starter will be there in a week or so, and went to look - yep, there's a brown connector on it.

263766
 

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The front-most VSV (for the fuel pressure regulator) bolts way up under where the short intake piece bolts to the head. Use the front-most bottom bolt that goes into the head, next to the coolant hose barb.
 

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Are you reusing your old wire harness corrugated split loom? When I rebuilt my engine I replaced all of that with new loom and replaced the old tape as well. High temp loom for auto applications has a white stripe on it. Also self-fusing rubber tape holds up better than black standard electrical tape. Here is one source but there are many including amazon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #247 ·
Yeah, I reused mine just as is. Frankly, I don't want to flex, bend, fold or mutilate it beyond the most minimal handling. My weak area in cars is electrical, so if the car won't start when I bolt it all up, I"m hosed and will be towing it and writing big checks. So, manipulating the harness further to redo stuff just was not in the cards, though I can see the long term advantage. I carefully put the harness in storage in a loose bag, then carried it out to the car with someone holding the other end, etc. Color me paranoid.

Asterix. Yeah, that was the logical place for it but I didn't want to untorque the bolt without knowing and was going to be content hiding it up high with a zip tie. I'll happily put it on the proper screw now thanks to that tip - mucho appreciado!!
 

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Toyota Supra Turbo 7M-GTE with R154 5-speed
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Allright! The wiring harness is on the engine and everything on the left side of the engine is connected. All the vacuum lines on the entire engine are also new, so if the thing won't start I won't be holding my head in my hands wondering which hose is buried and leaking under there. I got some help from the forum confirming where the thick wire bundle drops through the intakes, and next I'll get the other side's wires connected. Much simpler on that side as mfrs try not to put things near the exhaust manifold when they have a choice. So that should be 10 minutes, and if I can't sleep I'm going back out...

Here's a reference photo if it helps others one day. My notes are removed and that VSV hanging from its vacuum lines is now zip tied high up out of sight. Could not find where it's bracket bolted on. The brown connector halfway visible straight to the right (rearward) of the motor mount had me scratching my head. Nothing on the lower fender. Nothing on the bottom of the firewall. No place left to connect it to a sensor within reach. Finally, I realized the starter will be there in a week or so, and went to look - yep, there's a brown connector on it.

View attachment 263766
I held off on responding because I didn't recognize any of that :) Now I understand that's how it looked originally.

Here is what was left of my OEM harness prior to getting one built by Tweak'd:

Plant Branch Road surface Asphalt Twig

Freaked me out wondering if I had been so wrong :( lol
 

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inspect that harness for areas that are cracked (the loom material). the area it goes over the head, behind the cam covers is a weak point. wherever the harness transitions from molded pieces / branches out is a weak point. tesa makes a harness tape that is cloth (oem style for audi, mercedes if you get under german hoods). seems to adhere well and add some mechanical strength. aka you can reinforce the brittle plastic weak points without reworking the harness. the cloth tape is not shiny like oem, but looks very good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #250 ·
Overall, the harness looked pretty good. Even near the EGR where I expected some heat discoloration, etc. The car was in a mild climate heat wise (pacific NW USA) and then parked in a barn. I pulled a couple of connectors off using a pin release tool. One because I put it in the wrong spot and had to pull it back through and didn't want the tension of the connector being pulled back through, and the other because we must have pulled on it somehow during disassembly a couple years ago. They both looked good and actually I'm impressed with the connector quality - weather plugs on each wire, long connections on the pins to spread the load, etc. Thanks for the tip on the tape - I will pick some of that up and wrap the areas described.

Tonight I connected all the sensors, installed the new Toyota oil hose (came early) torqued the air chamber and bits, moved the VSV to the correct bolt (thanks), and installed the new TPS. Holy cow do I suck at electrics. I had to watch a YouTube video to remember how to use the ohm scales. Then I was setting it and things weren't making sense. Finally noticed in the manual you are supposed to switch to different contacts for the feeler guage tests. Rattled my confidence but in the end I adjusted it to where it passed all 4 tests. A dab of yellow paint on the screw, of course.

I also put new hoses on that funky two-legged PCV arrangement atop the valve covers. You guys put clamps on yours, or let 'em just sit?

So I believe I'm down to the alternator, power steering pump, accessory belt, and then time to put it in the hoist so I can get the rear main aluminum carrier installed (Huge note to self to replace the oil gallery plug back there I removed when I cleaned the block) and then seal the oil pan on. I'm not using the gasket that came in my kit, instead using a FIPG type product. If I get much done Friday night, I may be in a position Sunday to install the engine.

Any recommendations for installing it with the tranny attached, or separately?

I also need to put the fuel tank back together (I cleaned it last year) with the new fuel pump and filter. I'm going to use anti-sieze on the fuel filter so the NEXT person who replaces it has an easy time. If I didn't have the fuel tank out of the way for other reasons, I'd have been really pissed at the amount of bracket bending force it took to remove that thing. Here's how she looks tonight:

263814
 

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Nice to see a GE going together that's not mine. I have spring clamps on that 2-legged PCV pipe, though the ones I have are overkill. Better overkill than have goo everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #254 · (Edited)
Done - thanks. I have the big engine hoist as I also have a pair of LandCruiser straight 6's and if I ever pull one of those I'm told the blocks weigh as much as a 454. So it won't break a sweat.

So today was one of those evenings you'll recognize if you've ever done a massive job like this. If you've read the thread thus far you'll know I've done work at both ends of the vehicle, work on top, work underneath, work on the engine, body work with fiberglas on the battery tray, etc. Sometimes when you head out to "the Supra" the project has so many "threads" that you sometimes just switch gears into something else. And that's OK, but sometimes writing about it feels odd.

I was walking with a buddy who asked what it's like to do a project car. I found myself saying that it's like a jigsaw puzzle where you can start and stop whenever you have time. You can work on putting the pieces on one end of the puzzle, or the other end and even switch strategies whenever you feel like doing something different. So they're similar. But the big difference is with a puzzle you just toss it back in the box, whereas with a car you get to turn the key and drive it!

I intended to finish the engine, but in the service manual it says "install PS reservoir" and I remembered I wanted to clean mine. Boy howdy. I looked in the tank and the filter screen looks like the set from "The Martian". Reddish brown layer that looks like dried oil with lumps of other oily substance. Trading cost for time, I fired an entire can of brake cleaner in there. I go through these like a drunken sailor and they're now $8/can so it's starting to add up. But it hardly touched the stuff. So I came in to see how much a new one is and what you guys have done and found similar frustrating results.

So I put gasoline in an old coffee can and pushed it down so its fully immersed and we went to dinner at a friends. Came home a few hours later and it's notably cleaner. Sloshed it around and will leave it overnight like that and see what I have in the morning. I guess these are over $100 now for a different model, so I'll see what luck I have cleaning this one before throwing in the towel.

I also painted the throttle body braces as I noted they were looking pretty sad. Sometimes when you go out to a project with so many moving parts you feel like someone yelled "squirrel" and 3 hours later you find yourself carefully cleaning a plastic tank and there's a couple little bits of metal now painted black, when you were going to button up the engine. I'm still hopeful I will have the engine in the hoist by Sunday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #255 · (Edited)
The PS reservoir was a success. A can of brake cleaner hosing the screen down directly didn't do much. Overnight soaking in gasoline didn't remove it, but did seem to soften it as yesterday I gently brushed it but nothing really moved.

After about 14hrs in gasoline, I sloshed the gasoline around and repeatedly poured it out until the gasoline was brown. However the screen still seemed mostly blocked and I seemed to be dissolving the dried oil coating the entire interior, not removing the tiny bits and layer on the screen. So I finished doing that general interior wall cleaning until there were just a few small spots of dark grey oil on the walls of the container. I'm less concerned about that vs the screen but it was coming off so I kept at it. Then the still unimproved screen.

I tried some undustrial looking pipe cleaners in the kids (now grown) hobby drawer, winding two together to have more wiping strength. See pic for these. Didn't seem to move much at all and felt like a waste of time. Then I looked around the garage for some small things that I could drop in there and swish around the screen like I did when cleaning the fuel tank (a pound of nuts and bolts worked great). Nothing I could think of will fit down that hole and keep in mind you have to get these back OUT. So no stainless steel, no plastic, etc as the top of the tank is an anti splash thing like the entrance to a wasp trap - hard to get stuff out.

Brainstorm. Cut 3M abrasive pads into 1.5" strips less than a quarter inch wide (so you can later pull them out), toss a half dozen in the upper tank with fingers on the bottom outlets and fill with gasoline. Swish for 10 seconds, drain. Voila! Immediate progress. So refill and continue for a few minutes, even upside down with the lid on to attack the leftover dark stuff on the walls. Then used hemostats and a dental pick to pull them back out (or a piece of wire with a little 90 degree bend on the tip would do fine) and do the same thing on the lower chamber on the other side of that big screen. That was the hot setup, seemed to gently scrub/abrade the screen, and my screen is clear.

You'll need a suction device to pull the stuff you loosened out as the reservoir upper tank is not shaped to allow pouring it out. Spray the chamber you've cleaned with the tank on its side where you can see the debris puddle against the side. Then suction that puddle out and repeat until you seem to have sucked out all the debris and it rinses clear. At the very end I did this again with gasoline because you can completely immerse and fill the tank in your can of gasoline and that's cheaper than yet another brake cleaner can. Repeat on the lower chamber, which is easier because you CAN pour out the debris laden fluid quickly and repeat until it's clear.

I also used compressed air to blast it dry, then again with the gasoline immersion and again with the blast of air from my compressor. This got a few more particles off the screen and I was hoping it would not blow a hole in the screen. At 100 PSI with a trigger operated short metal tube, I did not damage the screen from the top just informationally, though I did not shove the tube tip any closer than a half inch or so. Be careful with that.

I should have taken a before picture but just know that I was shocked when I looked in there with a bright light yesterday. That would have put a strain on the old pump and they're not cheap I'd bet. The car has not run for 22 years and the screen looked 100% blocked with a reddish brown layer of grundge as I foolishly just drained it when I stripped out the engine. So that residue sat there and dried and might have been more easily rinsed 2 years ago when I emptied the system. It had tiny black bits of a thicker grease like substance that seemed stuck in about 70% of the holes as well. Now the screen has whatever those are stuck in perhaps 5% of the holes and I figure they are simply perfect size things wedged into the screen and I'll tear the screen going for them Not worth the risk. Here's a picture of what I used:


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Here's a picture of the cleaned screen. The dirt in the background is a bit of the layer still left in the bottom. I'll run new fluid, then change it after a month or so and hope the hot fresh oil gets that stuff out as well, though my intention was not perfection. There will be debris in the pump and hoses and cooler as well this quick change should help clean. The circular things are the mold marks in the bottom and in the fore ground, you can see the grid of the screen I wanted to show with a few black dots here and there. I'm pleased, and hope this helps someone. I saw other threads where this process sucked and ended poorly, so thought I'd share in case it helps someone in the future.

263866
 

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Discussion Starter · #258 ·
Good call - filtration is a key to long life.

So, I got the engine out of the stand into the hoist today and cleaned up the work space for this next phase. It's pretty exciting to see the pile of parts go from an 8 foot diameter circle of oil covered parts, down to a couple small boxes. I put the final hose on today, installed the alternator (opened it and checked the brushes, cleaned them a bit), the belts and the fan. Wow that fan is nightmarish to install. I put paint marks on my pulley and on the nose of the pump, so one day when I'm leaning down there I can just line up the paint marks and shove a bolt in. My pulley had a gouge on it, so I lapped it on a piece of granite to flatten it. I don't want to feel that fan vibrating after all this work, plus new motor mounts.

I had the smaller Harbor Freight engine leveler and when I opened it, the tool is just not long enough. So I went over and exchanged it for the 26" long one. It's perfect for the Supra and has a better arrangement for connecting easily to our engine lift hooks. The smaller one has these arms permanently attached that are just a bit incompatible. So there's that.

Once in the lift, I could finally put my new rear main seal in, plus the pilot bearing, and then the oil pan. Woo. The oil pan. What a nightmare. I used Permatex's version of oil pan sealant and that was great to work with. However, my oil pans bolt holes did not line up well and it took waaaaay more time to get the pan situated, plus the product want you to hand tighten them for an hour. Mine were so tight I needed to use the ratchet, so a mishmash of guessing how much squish I was creating. Very frustrating and much use of the rubber hammer.

Distributor's on, yes I remembered to install that rear oil gallery plug,and next I'll tackle cleaning those hard fuel lines from the engine bay back to the fuel tank. Going to run a solvent through them and spray them out with air before putting on the fuel filter and installing the tank. I set the engine down for the night on jackstands as I would hate for it to leak down overnight and be resting on the oil pan with uncured sealant.

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Here's a couple shots of a fully dressed 7MGE with no oil pan that I found kind of interesting:
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Getting exciting. We are going camping for Labor Day, otherwise I'd predict the engine would be back in the car by the end of the long weekend. A guy can dream, eh?
 

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when you do startup keep in mind the 7mge uses an airflow meter. it needs to be hooked up, its on the air filter housing. these are old school mechanical meters, there is a moving metal door that swings against a spring. if you don't have all the intake pipe hooked up (everything, no leaks, clamps tight) you will run into problems.

in fact, the fuel pump will not turn on unless the afm is hooked up and swung open 1/4 inch. fact you can prime the fuel system / check for leaks by:
1. key on, run position
2. push the afm flapper open with your finger
3. listen for the relay to click (its under the hood by the passenger strut tower) and fuel sounds to whoosh around (remember engine is off for this test)

super common rookie ge mistake....try cranking it over without any air hoses connected. trips a check engine light and makes super erratic fuel delivery.

priority of sensors that need to work perfect for ge to run / idle

cps
afm
throttle pos
coolant temp

cps is known for shit brittle wiring. in your region, i would be worried about salt corrosion (not sure how far from coast you are but constant 50-70 degrees + humidity is lots of corrosion) . anyway cps connector sits on hot size and has issues. if you get no spark (and no tach needle movement) id wiggle / clean that.

afm has a mechanical trace board inside. as the flapper door opens up the resistance changes. there is a black cover that is siliconed on and the guts are under there. they are known to have flat spots when they go out...aka a certain afm range where it stops working.

but all this old toyota stuff is long lasting and Id say there is a good chance it fires up because your checking things/ putting a new pump in etc.
 

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when you do startup keep in mind the 7mge uses an airflow meter. it needs to be hooked up, its on the air filter housing. these are old school mechanical meters, there is a moving metal door that swings against a spring. if you don't have all the intake pipe hooked up (everything, no leaks, clamps tight) you will run into problems.

in fact, the fuel pump will not turn on unless the afm is hooked up and swung open 1/4 inch. fact you can prime the fuel system / check for leaks by:
1. key on, run position
2. push the afm flapper open with your finger
3. listen for the relay to click (its under the hood by the passenger strut tower) and fuel sounds to whoosh around (remember engine is off for this test)

super common rookie ge mistake....try cranking it over without any air hoses connected. trips a check engine light and makes super erratic fuel delivery.

priority of sensors that need to work perfect for ge to run / idle

cps
afm
throttle pos
coolant temp

cps is known for shit brittle wiring. in your region, i would be worried about salt corrosion (not sure how far from coast you are but constant 50-70 degrees + humidity is lots of corrosion) . anyway cps connector sits on hot size and has issues. if you get no spark (and no tach needle movement) id wiggle / clean that.

afm has a mechanical trace board inside. as the flapper door opens up the resistance changes. there is a black cover that is siliconed on and the guts are under there. they are known to have flat spots when they go out...aka a certain afm range where it stops working.

but all this old toyota stuff is long lasting and Id say there is a good chance it fires up because your checking things/ putting a new pump in etc.
Wow! So much great information. Big help to me as I eliminate my AFM (among other things) and attempt to get running on an aftermarket, largely unknown ECU. Hopefully by eliminating the OEM ECU I’m also eliminating some of the nuances that will keep my car from firing. I don’t want to hijack @IdahoDoug’s build thread, but acknowledge your continued contribution… not just to him, but others, as well. Lurkers learn a lot from posts like this, and one day we have to deliver :). Thank you.
 
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