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The debate will always rage on whether the 348 or the 355 was the better Ferrari, but there's no denying that the small-displacement, high revving V8s located between the flanks of both cars were simply epic. From a design standpoint, the distinct 80s flavor of the gills on the side of the 348 make it an instant personal favorite, though some of the technical details are what seal the deal.

When released in 1989, the 348 was equipped with the Tipo F119D, a 3.4-liter quad-cam, 4-valve per cylinder, dry-sump lubed V8, which produced 300 horsepower at launch and 320 horsepower in later iterations. The 90° V8 was a development of the Ferrari 328 and featured a bore and stroke of 85 x 75mm respectively. Peak power was reached at 7200 rpm with a 10.4:1 compression and used a Bosch Motronic M2.5 fuel injection system.

The 348 marked a departure from previous small Ferraris by having an engine situated longitudinally and its gearbox transversely, a layout similar to the Ferrari 288 GTO and F40. Helping this change was the switch from a tubular steel chassis to a pressed steel chassis with a tubular engine sub-frame that also helped Ferrari comply with new global crash test regulations. Another major change was made at the request of Ferrari's racing program; the entire engine was attached to the rear suspension system and required full removal for any major servicing. It also made for easy powertrain replacement in the future 348 Challenge cars.

What we're looking at today is the removal of said engine in order for it to receive its 30k servicing and according to its owner sameerrao, from The Auto Union, it will receive a new water pump and Hill Eng tensioner bearings as well as a full inspection of a cam leak on the right side, the lower drive pulleys and a strange tapping sound coming from the left cylinder bank. Looks pricey!
















 

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The debate will always rage on whether the 348 or the 355 was the better Ferrari


Wait... there was a debate??? I just always assumed because the 348 had pieces falling off from the factory that people would, you know, make a quick decision on that one :lol:


Cool threads though buddy. :bigthumb:
 

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The 355 is still one of the best Ferraris ever made. These pics of the 348 are very cool! Thanks for sharing.
 

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What debate :lol:

I would not touch a 348 with a 10 ft pole for personal use, most unreliable modern Ferrari bar none.
 

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agreed!

welll, maybe a 348 GT Competizione LM.... maybe.
 

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^ Good luck! Just remember, while you may be able to afford getting the car, be sure you can afford the Ferrari maintenance cost as well.
 

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^ Good luck! Just remember, while you may be able to afford getting the car, be sure you can afford the Ferrari maintenance cost as well.
Ferrari maintenance is overhyped.

17,000 miles in my Ferrari in 16 months

Road raced 3 times and autox-'d every month

Over 80 launches on the ORIGINAL clutch at 7500 rpm's with launch control.

Long distance trips from Orlando and to TX2K8. NEVER LEFT STRANDED EVER!


Driven in 17 degree weather and 112 degree with no issues.

Maintenance costs:

4 x oil change = $200/ea

2 rear tires = $665

I'll do the 30k service at 50k miles.

Minor things I need to fix:

$60 part for suspension - triggering suspension error light

convertible top needs hydraulic fluid - don't really care to fix this as I never use it but probably will this summer just in case I want to use it. $50 for the fluid and 30 minutes of my time.

When my suspension light came on I called the Ferrari dealer and they told me it would be a MINIMUM of $2,000 or more depending on how many shocks had to be replaced. Did some research on fchat and it was just a $60 part that is causing the problem.

Don't get me wrong, you can get unlucky and it's ALWAYS smart to have money on the side when you own a Ferrari because parts are not that cheap and neither are the qualified mechanics.

But I set aside $5,000/year for maint and minus oil changes and tires I haven't had to dip into it yet. I plan on hitting 50k miles this year. I look forward to giving a detailed cost analysis when I reach 100k miles to show people how durable these cars really are.

If you talk to most F355 owners direct on fchat, most of them have had very reliable cars. Now if you talk to the uncle dogwalkers brothers friend, his car was ALWAYS broken.
 

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Oh lawd, looks 'spensive!

I am loving these Ferrari teardown threads (I just finished reading about the turbine-powered Testarossa on Fchat, wtf!!!).
 

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If I recall correctly, the 348 was the last of the primarily hand assembled cars, which instantly throws it's reliability and build quality into question. The 355, and all later cars, were built with much more automation and precision. Again, this is to the best of my recollection after reading a bit about the history of these cars.

Nice to hear about your ongoing 355 experience Kevin! :)
 

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Kevin:

I think it is worth mentioning though that the early 355 years had their problems too though...
 

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I recently went through the exercise of comparing the two models as I was thinking about getting a 348 last year (until the markets tanked that is). Some quick notes on the two:

As good as 355s are, they've had their fare share of quality problems too (valve guides, exhaust manifolds, FI transmission, airbag............) all of which were expensive to fix. The upkeep was more difficult than your typical 348 too (ie. doing a valve job on a 348 is do-able by a DIY. Good luck trying to do it on the 355).

348s had quality (and at the limit handling) issues early on in their model cycle, most of which were ironed out in later years. Most drivers seem to prefer the driving style of the 348, as the 355 had power brakes, power steering, F1 tanny, which did not agree with purists (even it they helped make the 355 more comfortable to race in).

From visiting various Ferrari sites and talking to 3xx owners, it seems both the 348 and 355 have their good points and their bad points. However, with proper maintenance and care both have shown to be quite competent and enjoyable cars, just depends which one you like more (and/or can afford).

Sonny

edit: Thanks for the pictures PDQDSM. I always enjoy reading posts like this one.
 

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You seem to be glossing over how much this costs. Ive seen from 10-15k from on various forums.
The 30k service is $1,600 in parts, most authorized dealers will charge you 35-40 hours of labor. So your grand total comes to $7,500 - $8,000.

If you take it to an independent shop you can get it done for $5,000 - $5,500.

I plan on doing it myself with the help of a few friends but using an independents rate of $5,500 it comes down to $5,500 = $6.36 mile for the 30k. Is that higher than your average car? Yes. But it's not bad for a Ferrari, not like most people exaggerate it. If you can spend $50-70k on a clean F355 you can afford to spend $5,500 every 3 years on the service. Most of buy $25,000 Supras and spend $5,500 in modifications the first year we have them!

wow maintenance for a F355 isnt that bad. RossoCorsaItaly, do u know how maintanance is like for a f360?
Maintenance for a 360 is MUCH cheaper. The belts can be done when they are in the car and these cars are much more daily driveable. The only issue with the 360 is that the clutch is a major job, almost 30 hours of labor. But if you know how to properly drive the clutch your costs will be even lower than a 355.



Kevin:

I think it is worth mentioning though that the early 355 years had their problems too though...
The valve guide issues in the 95- early 98 model is the main one I am aware of. With the engine out procedure it's only an additional $2,200-$2,500 or so. The good thing is that most cars that were affected by the valve guide issue have already had the valve guides done as it seems to come up around 15k miles.

My suggestion for people out there who are interested in picking up a 355 would be to get a manual hardtop if you want the least issues. The F1 system can be more costly if the pump fails and the convertible top can be quirky at times requiring more maint.

Common problems are:

Exhaust Manifolds fail around 20-25k miles. This is a one time fix, you can send them to a company called QV London who charges $1,800 to rebuild them and makes them failproof. Many people have put 50+k miles on the rebuilt manifolds.

Valve Guide issue on the 95- early 98 cars - Again most of the vehicles that were affected have already been fixed and updated with the proper valve guides. $2,200-$2,500 for this with the engine out service is the usual rate at authorized dealers.

F1 Pump Failure - This one is not that common, but a few cases have come up meaning that it can eventually become a common problem as these cars age. On the 98-99 cars equipped with the F1 transmission the pump has been known to fail, the pump from Ferrari costs $15,000. However many owners have found alternatives.

Often times the pump relay only needs to be changed which cost less than $100.

The motor can be rebuilt often for a few hundred dollars.

The 360 pump can be retrofitted for around $3,500.

The original pump can be purchased again from the manufacturer Denso for around $4,000.

A rare problem, but one to consider if you own an F1 model.

Spider Top Issues: The spider top tends to quit working a lot, often times it is just a fuse or fluid but if the main structural parts gets damaged, buying parts new is often not practical, luckily top parts are readily available on eBay.

Catalytic Converters - Many owners switch to high flow cats or straight pipes because the factory cats are part of what causes the premature manifold wear and they trigger the "slow down" light to come on the 355. Which often means catalytic converter is overheating, this is rarely the case however, the system is quirky and costs hundreds of dollars in sensors to replace so I would suggest just going with a high flow cat or race pipes depending on your states regulations and your love of the environment.

That covers most of the major 355 issues.

A 348 can be a nightmare to own, unless you specifically like something about the 348 more than the 355, avoid them at all costs and pay the extra $20k and get the 355.
 

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