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J

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Discussion Starter #1
Is there something I can replace inside number1 in picture?
The slide bushing (nr.2) is way too loose inside the calibers 'ear', so it can get in an angle and STUCK. Rotors are also warped but I don't wanna replace those without getting something done in here also. I assume that I can get new bushings but how about that other part?
 

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answer- New Calipers.

Well thats the short answer anyways. I don't have alot of experience on that end of the brakes. Just take Nmbr 1 to a shop and ask if it possible to rebuild that portion of the caliper. Hell, thats what I'd do! :bigthumb:
 
S

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Discussion Starter #3
All the calipers I've seen are fairly sloppy in the fit of the pin to the bore.

I'm surprised yours is getting stuck. Is it well lubricated?

You can take some sandpaper and polish the bore, if there is corrosion or notches in there.

If that fails, you'll need to get a new caliper, but that will most likely have a sloppy fit also.
 

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the only thing that could possible be done would be to get a bushing pressed in, but then were talking machine etc. and the price would end up being more than the cost of all the calibers on your car ;) . just get a remanufactured caliber, it's not that expensive.
 
J

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Discussion Starter #5
Shawndude said:
All the calipers I've seen are fairly sloppy in the fit of the pin to the bore.

I'm surprised yours is getting stuck. Is it well lubricated?

You can take some sandpaper and polish the bore, if there is corrosion or notches in there.

If that fails, you'll need to get a new caliper, but that will most likely have a sloppy fit also.
Well, I've been fighting with these brakes for 3 years now.
I have cleaned everything so there is no notches etc. at all.Those parts are also well lubricated. Just came to my mind that I have cleaned those too much now and that's why those are so sloppy,guess maybe not then:)

So next target is the piston itself. How easily it should move when connected or not connected to brake lines? It also looks very clean and I have replaced all the sealings etc... Could it be only the warped rotors that cause all this s*it(?) Everything warms up and won't work anymore? Maybe I will try new discs and see if this still happens...
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I had a problem with my passenger side break getting stuck. I can tell you what worked for me...

I opened the little bleed valve, and squeesed the piss out of the piston to get all the fluid out. Tightened the valve back up, added more break fluid, and was good to go.

Somehow, there was too much fluid inside the piston and it wasn't retracting. No probs since.
 
J

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Discussion Starter #8
grankor said:
I had a problem with my passenger side break getting stuck. I can tell you what worked for me...

I opened the little bleed valve, and squeesed the piss out of the piston to get all the fluid out. Tightened the valve back up, added more break fluid, and was good to go.

Somehow, there was too much fluid inside the piston and it wasn't retracting. No probs since.
Been there, done that:) I have flushed the whole system with fresh brake fluid and squeesed the piston many times from out 2 in & in 2 out. No help:( Well, this kind of repairs have helped me through 3 years, but not anymore. I'm waiting for new discs now, so let's see if it still stucks.
(btw. new caliper from Toyota here in Finland costs over 450EUR! so that's not the first thing I will change).
 

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Try a different kind of lubricant on the slide?
 

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After two "cheaper" attempts, the following worked for me.

1) Use a BFH to knock the caliper from the caliper mount. :D
2) Get a rebuilt caliper. This insures that the hole for the slide pin should be in good condition.
3) Buy a new bolt and slide pin from toyota. This will prevent any existing corrosion on the slide pin working into the caliper body and simply freezing up again.
4) Use the pink colored moly grease toyota includes in its caliper rebuild kits on the slide pin. Good stuff.

If you want to "save money" with an AutoZone/Pepboys/etc rebuilt caliper watch out if you have 91 or 92. The caliper piston size is NOT the same as the 87-90 models. No one but Toyota seems to know this.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
First of all, you need to get new rotors, without these, you will be running into more problems in the future. Second, get some new slider pin bushings, they are not hard to press in yourself, you can even do it with your hand. You don't need a whole new caliper just for this. Just to be on the safe side I would get some new slider pins as well. I would use anti-seize on the slider pins themselves (not the threads where you put this stuff most of the time). You also might try a new brake hose, sometimes on old hardware on the inside of the hose it gets eaten away at and a little flap forms causing it to not release pressure in the line and causing that caliper to seize.
 
J

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Discussion Starter #15
me'n'mysupra said:
First of all, you need to get new rotors, without these, you will be running into more problems in the future. Second, get some new slider pin bushings, they are not hard to press in yourself, you can even do it with your hand. You don't need a whole new caliper just for this. Just to be on the safe side I would get some new slider pins as well. I would use anti-seize on the slider pins themselves (not the threads where you put this stuff most of the time). You also might try a new brake hose, sometimes on old hardware on the inside of the hose it gets eaten away at and a little flap forms causing it to not release pressure in the line and causing that caliper to seize.
So, is there a bushing INSIDE the calipers upper 'ear'? I will get a new bolt&bushing which are connected to torque plate, but how about that in caliper? Well, I will take whole caliper apart when start repairing so I'll see by myself:) Still waiting for new rotors...
I've heard about that brake hose thing earlier, so at least I will take it away and flush/inspect it, maybe get a new one also.
THANX, this was best answer for now!-)
 
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Discussion Starter #16
...and some more questions:) I took the piston out now, but how easily it SHOULD go back? I know if it isn't in right angle it won't go, but how much force is normal? By tapping all around the pistons bottom I can get it in, but is this normal? Should it go by hand?
 

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i was able to put mine in by hand when i rebuilt my calipers last year. took some pressure but it wasn't excessive.

on the same topic.... what's the best lubricant on the market?
 
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Discussion Starter #18
soup said:
on the same topic.... what's the best lubricant on the market?
I tried various brake lubricants before and none of them worked very well. I even tried high heat anti-seize compound, and that didn't work well either.

Then I found a brake lubricant at Canadian Tire, in a small silver and black squeeze bottle, with a green label. I don't have it handy to get the name, but I think they only have one type there. It is just under 8 dollars for the bottle and is kept by the RTV sealants in the automotive section.

It works extremely well, and I haven't had any problems with it at all. I would highly recommend it over other brands.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
Shawndude said:
I tried various brake lubricants before and none of them worked very well. I even tried high heat anti-seize compound, and that didn't work well either.
Well, I found my gasket-packet that I had bought earlier for brakes and it included some orange & white stuff with it,in little bags. Have to say that those are best what I have tried:) Earlier I tried that high heat stuff also, but it made all very sticky:(

Now I even managed to push that piston in the caliber with hand-power only:) (cleaned the piston VERY well) And slidings & pads are moving freely too...Should get new rotors in friday, so then I know if these really work. We'll see;)
 

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ive had extensive experience with brake problems, and after a few rebuilds and caliper changes I would recommend just purchasing new/remanufactured calipers. I purchased mine for about 30USD each from ABC auto parts. This was nearly equal to the cost of a rebuild kit. Granted, they were "unloaded" meaning they were just the piston part of the assembly, not the part that holds the pad. A new boot for the slider(s) should come with it when you purchase the part. Dont just replace one, replace them as a pair.

A new caliper gives you the perfect opportunity to paint it before you install. Do a light cleaning with a soft wire brush and greaseless solvent that will evaporate completely (carb cleaner/brake cleaner/gasoline). Paint them to avoid rusty/crusty calipers down the road.

When installing the new brake calipers, be sure to change your brake fluid. Purge the lines thouroughly. Brake fluid should be clean.

Use a HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAKE (yes, i said BRAKE) CALIPER GREASE and nothing else!! Not anti seize, wheel bearing grease, or wd40.

To close, you should be able to push the piston in by hand, when the brakes are not applied. If you cant, you need new calipers. I want to take a stab in the dark and say that your OTHER slide is sticking, and thats why it is angled. Also, check to see if the pad-holding part of the caliper is screwed in all the way on the slide. It is threaded.
 
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