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Discussion Starter #1
During my stints on shorter tracks I experience what I assume is fuel starvation. Under high G turns, switchbacks and heavy braking, the fuel seems to slosh around and create dead spots when I press the accelerator. Some corners I push 1.2Gs at tracks like Gingerman in Michigan. Only happens with less than 1/2 a tank and becomes more prevelant the closer I get to a quarter tank. I have the stock baffle in place, but run two Walbros with E85. Needless to say I was topping off the tank after nearly every session.

Anyone else experience this issue? Should I try to extend the pick up, install a different baffle or is there a more simple solution I am missing here? The car runs fine when filled up. Im just looking to make this less of a hassle.

-Bill
 

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Unlimited Time Attack A70
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During my stints on shorter tracks I experience what I assume is fuel starvation. Under high G turns, switchbacks and heavy braking, the fuel seems to slosh around and create dead spots when I press the accelerator. Some corners I push 1.2Gs at tracks like Gingerman in Michigan. Only happens with less than 1/2 a tank and becomes more prevelant the closer I get to a quarter tank. I have the stock baffle in place, but run two Walbros with E85. Needless to say I was topping off the tank after nearly every session.

Anyone else experience this issue? Should I try to extend the pick up, install a different baffle or is there a more simple solution I am missing here? The car runs fine when filled up. Im just looking to make this less of a hassle.

-Bill
Run a surge tank setup so your high flow pumps will always be submerged in fuel. Have a lift pump in your tank supplying the surge tanks with your high flow pumps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Run a surge tank setup so your high flow pumps will always be submerged in fuel. Have a lift pump in your tank supplying the surge tanks with your high flow pumps.
Certainly, this is a tried and true solution. Was hoping to avoid some of the complexity this would bring since I still consider it a street car. Even though I hardly drive the car on the street anymore. Guess I need to choose which world to live in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Buy a Holley Hydromat to fit your tank.]

I considered the hydromat which would work great for most applications. I am concerned about the life, when running E85. Also having a composite tank makes mounting more difficult. One solution I considered was to run tank foam to help hold down the element. Not sure how well foam would work in a stock tank with a sending unit though.
 

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Just started running the Hydromat in a car. Works as advertised, those it’s recovery time once all slosh is off of it is a tad slower. No surprise there.

Problem with it currently is that they only offer two applications that use the “standard” attachment. Otherwise you’re stuck trying to figure out how to AN fitting the inlet of your fuel pump.

And those given sizes do no favors for saddle tanks.
 

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I think that his is a great invention. The stock tank can be outfitted with two mats with 2 separate AN hoses going to each mat and then to a 'Y' fitting then to the pickup in the sump to allow all fuel to be scavenged out of the tank. Not a big fan of running a fuel cell on a street car, or even any car for that matter, the poem gas tank is sufficient enough in fact I even went so far cause I compete in Mountain Cimbing racing here in Europe, like Pikes Peak in the states, and sourced a 21 gallon poem fuel tank that was only offered in the UK. The mounting solution with Click Bond I can attest to they are extremely strong as I work in aviation and we use them on plastic, and carbon fiber surfaces, in fuel and outside of fuel environments. Not a single problem with the mounting studs or epoxy.
 
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