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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Head ported and Swain Tech coatings now with PICS

I ported the head and then had Swain Tech coat the chambers and exhaust ports. It didnt take that long to do the porting. Just removing the rough material from just below the valve seats will help a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
well i have tried to post pics even with small file size of 50k to 85K it will not post pics.

Anyone have any suggestions as to what to try to allow pics to be posted. THe faq section doesnt help and i tried to turn off my firewall and it still wont work.

I have several good pics to post of the progression of the port and coatings too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dirty Chamber

Just off the head. This is no. 6 with a BHG but I never got any coolant in the oil and probably drove with this and no 1 blown for many miles. I did have gurgling under the dash.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You can see in this intake port the step of material under the valve seat. It has been removed in one port. I did not mess with the divider in-between the valve seats. The port walls have not been touched yet and I will remove the casting line down the middle of the walls and open the port up some and removing more material as I come out of the bowl and towards the edge of the entrance. My ports match up with the lower intake manifold and gasket.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unported Chamber

Everything has been removed to port the intake and exhaust bowl area. The runners on the exhaust side I did not remove much material so the exit would be slightly smaller than the entrance at the exhaust valve seat. This allows the port to be bigger at the entrance and will get slightly tighter all the way to the exit of the exhaust port at the manifold. Gases will flow faster if the exit is slightly smaller than the entrance. I did this in reverse for the intakes. I did remove some material from the entrance of the intake port and not so much at the bowl area just under the intake seats. There was a lip of material under the valve seats that I did blend in to match the seats. I think just removing that will make air flow much smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Bowl half polished

Here one set of intake and exhaust ports have the first part of the material removed just under the seats. This needs to be smoothed out so the air can take the turn smoothly and not make tight turns. I did not mess with the valve boss because I want the head to last and the boss is needed to help absorb heat and make sure the valve goes in its proper direction. Longevity is decreased if I remove the boss. You can see the rough casting surface which will be smoothed out. The exhaust will be mirror finish unless you plan on coating the exhaust ports like I did. Standard Abrasives has a good head porting kit that I used along with an egg shaped cross cut carbide die and a straight tapered one for tight areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Bowl half polished

Here one set of intake and exhaust ports have the first part of the material removed just under the seats. This needs to be smoothed out so the air can take the turn smoothly and not make tight turns. I did not mess with the valve boss because I want the head to last and the boss is needed to help absorb heat and make sure the valve goes in its proper direction. Longevity is decreased if I remove the boss. You can see the rough casting surface which will be smoothed out. The exhaust will be mirror finish unless you plan on coating the exhaust ports like I did. Standard Abrasives has a good head porting kit that I used along with an egg shaped cross cut carbide die and a straight tapered one for tight areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
bowl half polished cont.

The intake ports are 80 grit finish to help atomization of fuel/air and to help the fuel not stick to the walls. The exhaust port needs to be super smooth so if your not coating a 120 grit finish or better will help keep carbon build up away. SA has a nice cross buff for this in 120 grit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Chamber unshrouding

Here I am removing the little bit of material around the valve seat in the chamber that are rough spots from installing the seats. Also any corners in the chamber as in the center where the head comes into the chamber are polished. I just polished them off a little not much so the intake and exhaust are separate. You can see the tapered carbide bit on the left. I had 4 junk valves cut to thin the face so I could seat them in and still be able to remove any material and not touch the seat. If you cut the valve seat with the die at any time you can very easily ruin the seat and it will have to be replaced. I had the valve seats and valves cut 5 way after I was finished porting completely. One valve here is original for comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Chamber and ports 80% done

I am getting close to finished. It is hard to reach around the boss and corners with cartridge rolls and carbide tips but that little bit wont matter. Try to remove the material so each port is the same. You don’t want one to be bigger than the rest. Each of my ports were within 3% of each other. I checked each one from top and side with calipers making sure each portion of the port was the same. The smallest one has to be as big as the biggest one. I can’t make the biggest port smaller.

I had to smooth it up to the desired finish and make sure everything was consistent. Since I was going to have Swain Tech coat the chambers I did not polish them smooth. Standard abrasives makes cross buffs that are flower shaped buffs to polish the chambers with the cut valve inserts to a mirror surface. This will help keep carbon build up down. I had my chambers and exhaust ports coated to keep heat out of the head so I did not have to do this. The coating needs a rough surface to adhere to. The pistons were coated too.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Chamber and valve precoat

Here it is all finished. The deck has been milled to super smooth. The blue dye is from the 5 angle valve job. If I was not coating the valves I would have polished their faces smooth too like the chamber would have been. I did have the head flowed after all of this. The low lift numbers were significantly higher. Just porting the first 1.5 inches of the port/bowl area will get good returns. Standard Abrasives has a good DIY page on this. Using just their cartridge rolls would take forever. I used the carbide tips for the major removal and their tapered cartridge rolls and cross buffs are very useful especially in the intake and exhaust ports.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Swain Tech coating

Everything is done. Only the exhaust valves were coated on the stem as to help keep heat out. The intake valves are on the left. The intake ports were not coated either. The coating looks like grey primer but it is hard to remove from the exhaust valve seats. I had to grind off the coating on the exhaust seats with lapping compound so the valves would seat properly.
 
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THATS WHAT IM TALKIN ABOUT THATS THE REAL S**T. NICE WORK WISH YOU LUCK WITH YOUR ENGINE. THATS HOW YOU DO PORT WORK YOURSELF THIS IS WHAT THE XPERTS CHARGE ALL THAT MONEY FOR .
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the complements. I figured if many people coat the pistons to keep heat out of the piston why not coat the head to keep heat out of the head.

Many say that the "pistons can take it" but the pistons are not part of the cooling system. If you can keep heat out of the piston and out of the head it will stay in the combustion chamber and go out the exhaust manifold. If a properly tuned combustion goes out the manifold hotter because this energy was not absorbed into the pistons and head then it will make more power for the same burn. I am not talking about managing EGTs here. When the pistons or head absorbs this heat that means energy is being absorbed into the engine instead of making power. Cooling gasses contract and hot gasses expand. I know much of the fuel is still burning when going out the ports but if heat is absorbed then the gas is cooler so less energy applied to the turbo.

How much power difference this is i dont know but it may also help detanation and hot spots.

Coating the chambers and exhaust ports cost about $400 shipped both ways.

I also coated the pistons with Swain tech gold coat and PC9 on the skirts. Whenever i get a turbo upgrade i will coat the exhaust manifold, turbine housing and downpipe with probably the white lightning heat coating.

I have tried to post pics of the pistons but the server must not be able to post any size pic right now. I will try to post a pic of one later.
 

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hey hal, im doing a similar port and polish job. in one of your posts it discusses how u only finished the intake bowls with a 80 grit to avoid fuel sticking on the walls? i have polished mine almost to a chrome like finish(very,very smooth) including all the intake and runners. Should i make the intake side a rougher surface? my motor is n/a and i dont really expect much hp improvement. i have read many threads on p&p, but i havent heard of a rougher finish around the bowls.
thx
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
According to what i have read the theory is when the walls and ports of the intake are mirror smooth the fuel in the air fuel mixture will adhere to the walls and wash along the walls. You want the fuel in the air not condensing along the walls.
When the walls are a 80 grit finish the surface is just rough enough that when the fuel touches the surface it will adhere but it will wash up to a "peak" on the 80 grit surface and remix with the air instead of washing along a smooth surface. This 80 grit surface only applies to the surface downstream from the injector port when the fuel has been added. The surface before the fuel is added such in the intake manifold can be mirror smooth. Of course the exhaust port needs to be mirror smooth to help keep carbon deposits from forming.

Goto Standard Abrasives website and they have a great article on DIY head porting. It is also a good idea to have the exit of a port to be slightly smaller than the entrance of the port as the velocity of the gases will be faster. This is very important for n/a vehicles and very important in exhaust ports. This is why i do not port match the exhaust ports to the exhaust manifold and the extra lip help to be a reversion dam which i would think would be helpful in a log type manifold on our cars.

Goto

http://www.sa-motorsports.com/diyport.aspx

for the SA article and this is a quote from that article.

Once you have worked the port entry with 40-grit, switch to the large, straight 80-grit cartridge roll (part no. 263163). The 80-grit gives you the smooth, but not polished, surface that is correct for intake ports. Once you finish the 80-grit step, stop, remove your gloves and feel the surface. When your tactile "QC checker" (your finger) senses the right finish on all the port walls, you're done.

The mirror finish in the intake manifold is fine but in the head from the injector to the valve seat (bowl area) needs to be 80 grit finish IMO.
 
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