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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,
Looking to replace the heater core hoses on a buddys NA-T. He's just using the stock ones at the moment. But would like to go to a silicone style like HPS has for the GTE's. I know they used to make an NA setup but it looks like they no longer do. And after talking with their sales guy it "might" be avalible again in the summer, but i'm not holding my breath.
Any other drop in ones out there that would work? If not I'll probably end up making something fit as a one off. But I'd like to stay away from that if at all possible (more connections etc)
 

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I wouldn't go with silicone, but that's just me. They don't sell them at a local parts store, like NAPA, etc?

If that's the case, you can take the old hoses to a parts store and find the closest thing and cut if necessary. They will flex a little. If the guy working there is cool, they usually let you look thru the hoses yourself, because it is a tedious process.

Al
 

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I just took delivery of a brand new set of OEM heater hoses from a contact in Japan.

Now I dont have to worry about a hose splitting while im on the track one day, and given the original ones have lasted 23 years already, I have no hesitation on the durability of the OEM items. These will still be perfect when Im almost 70 years old hahaha.

Also, for those that are interested, the OEM kit comes with all of the hard lines and clips too, which I thought was a nice touch :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey Guys,
Looking to replace the heater core hoses on a buddys NA-T. He's just using the stock ones at the moment. But would like to go to a silicone style like HPS has for the GTE's. I know they used to make an NA setup but it looks like they no longer do. And after talking with their sales guy it "might" be avalible again in the summer, but i'm not holding my breath.
Any other drop in ones out there that would work? If not I'll probably end up making something fit as a one off. But I'd like to stay away from that if at all possible (more connections etc)
Did some looking and everythign pretty much comes up as universal. Which I know the GE's have a crazy hose layout, so i'm not surprized. I'll probably end up making my own like I did on my car (made room for the 4" down pipe), but I figured for his setup keep it stock.

Whats the reason for not using the silicone stuff (just curious)? He ended up buying the upper and lower rad hoses with the silicone hose so I want to make sure that was the best choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I wouldn't go with silicone, but that's just me. They don't sell them at a local parts store, like NAPA, etc?

If that's the case, you can take the old hoses to a parts store and find the closest thing and cut if necessary. They will flex a little. If the guy working there is cool, they usually let you look thru the hoses yourself, because it is a tedious process.

Al
Very nice!
Honestly I'd rather he do that. since they've lasted him this long as well. And still are, but the radiator finally went out so he wanted to "upgrade" all the hoses etc. But to me if it's been holding up as long as it has I'd be doing the same thing and keeping it stock. He drives the car pretty much every day, summer, winter etc. It's 18deg F out today and he'll be driving it into work. Even has it out in the snow.

Does your contact still have some in stock? Although i'm sure it'll be $400 since I know they aren't cheap.
 

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Fwiw, I put the HPS turbo heater core hoses on my NA, seems to work fine.
247141
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Fwiw, I put the HPS turbo heater core hoses on my NA, seems to work fine.
View attachment 247141
That isn't to bad at all actually. I'll have to run it by my buddy and see if this might be a viable option if he still wants to go the silicon route.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I also found this conversion from PHR. Might be able to get this to work as well. Even if I need to cut a little here or there. I would think for the throttle body coolant then I can just run the standard silicon (or whatever type) hose instead of something pre-bent anyway. Been a long time since I've worked on a stock style setup, just trying to remember how it all goes haha

PHR Single Turbo Heater Core Hose Conversion
 

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Whats the reason for not using the silicone stuff (just curious)?
They stick out like a sore thumb, like in the engine pic above. If all the hoses were blue silicone and everything was polished aluminum, it might look okay. Just personal taste, I guess.

As long as they have reinforcement in the hose, they should function fine. When replacing radiator hoses, heater hoses almost always get overlooked, which they shouldn't.

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #11
They stick out like a sore thumb, like in the engine pic above. If all the hoses were blue silicone and everything was polished aluminum, it might look okay. Just personal taste, I guess.

As long as they have reinforcement in the hose, they should function fine. When replacing radiator hoses, heater hoses almost always get overlooked, which they shouldn't.

Al
Ahh Gotchya,
Yeah I'm not sure what colors he ordered (got the Mishimoto rad and hose kit) and then ran into trouble finding the heater hose stuff. He does try to keep everything in good condition thankfully (since I always work on the car) so i'm glad he at least trys his best to keep it 100%. The car is Red so i'm assuming either the Red or Black.
Although when I purchased mine a few years back it had the blue silicone vac hose everywhere. straight out of the 90's build haha. (That was quickly replaced)
247170
 

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They stick out like a sore thumb, like in the engine pic above. If all the hoses were blue silicone and everything was polished aluminum, it might look okay. Just personal taste, I guess.

As long as they have reinforcement in the hose, they should function fine. When replacing radiator hoses, heater hoses almost always get overlooked, which they shouldn't.

Al
Can't say I'd pick blue again for my TT swap, my tastes have changed in the last 5 years 😉.
 

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I would delete the coolant lines through the throttle body while you are in there.
really the only lines you need on the GE are the 2 going to the heater on the firewall that is in the picture.

to bypass the throttle body stuff:
you can remove the nipple on the drivers side water neck, and tap it for a 1/8 npt fitting and put a plug in it with sealant.
on the passenger side, there is a small metal nipple coming off the hard pipe for the throttle body. you need to seal that off also, weld it, plug it with a short hose, etc..
 

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^ The lines going to the throttle body are for de-icing in colder regions.
 

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I lived in the north east and did not notice the difference in winter, if you are somewhere that has extreme cold that you think it would help, then don't bypass it.
I haven't heard of anyone who actually bypassed it and has an issue as the engine warms up quick,and the throttle body intake sitting right on top of it.

And the reason it is there is not for de-icing, it is to quickly stabilize intake temps at running temperature (when fully warmed up) by using the super stable coolant temps (usually right at 180-190 degrees), as this gives factory ecu's a more stable idle quality cause the air temps aren't constantly fluctuating from like highway (colder temps) to sitting in traffic (hotter temps) for example. The idea is that it just makes all the air relatively hot, so its an easier calculation on the ecu and more stable.

If you really think about it... when you go to start it when its cold the coolant is the same temp as the throttle body, so it doesn't help de-ice anything right away, the intake will heat up on its own along with the coolant.
The idea was to stabilize the intake temperatures, which is great for a factory ecu, but for performance, you want it as cold as possible to get the most power out of it.
If you are slapping a turbo on your car, I will assume you are performance oriented, and all the factory stuff is not really helping as your turbo will heat up the intake temps above 100 degrees pretty fast unless you have a solid intercooler setup.

So the question is, why warm up the air that I just put thought an intercooler because it was too hot?
The answer is you are leaving power behind from heating up the air again, but the power delivery will be smoother and easier to tune.

I have heard the deicer thing so many times but that is not why it is there. if it was really for that the throttle would stick on the first couple presses in the cold till it started "de-icing".
I haven't heard of a throttle sticking in the bore on these cars due to being cold, as the throttle plate doesn't actually fully close (it stays cracked slightly at idle), but I guess it "could" happen.
 

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^ That's not what I meant by "de-icing". It's got nothing to do with startup. This comes from flying, where small airplanes have a "carb heat" control, to push coolant or hot air around the carburetor to keep it from icing at altitude. The speed at which cold air enters an intake can cause it to super-cool, and if it's humid (or full of condensed water, like clouds), that can cause icing inside the intake.
 

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Well that is interesting for sure didn't know about the planes.

Most all the old carb'd yotas have the heat riser I think for that purpose off the exhaust shield or manifold, but dunno if that is what they were going for here.
Either way, on a performance build you may not need it, we can prolly agree on that.
 
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