Supra Forums banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
The Guitar Hero
Joined
·
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so here is my history.

No speeding tickets
No accidents
No nothing

So, I guess the question is should I still start off on say an older 500?

Is it generally accepted to start off lower because there are so many clowns out there who can't take it slow?
Or is it more of, no matter how careful you are mistakes will happen?
Should I expect even taking it slow that the bike will go down at some point?

If it is more than likely the the bike will be down, then I guess it makes sense to not ruin a nicer bike.

The main reason I'm asking is overall cost. Just assuming it would cost more to buy a lesser bike, learn, then move up. Obviously, it'd be a while before I'd feel comfortable on a liter so don't think I'm thinking that.
 

·
Sheep on the hood...
Joined
·
511 Posts
ccntrol

you'll learn more by starting small
this is why dirt bike riders are some of the best motorcycle riders



did you take a MSF course?
I suggest doing that - getting a 250 and then doing some advanced courses they offer

don't rush
no need to
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
goldark said:
ccntrol

you'll learn more by starting small
this is why dirt bike riders are some of the best motorcycle riders



did you take a MSF course?

don't rush
no need to
+1 on this post

A smaller bike will be more forgiving when you make mistakes/slips compared to a liter bike.

I don't necessarily think a 600 would be a bad bike to start on but if you've never riden before, I'd go for a used 600 or smaller bike.

"You start riding with a empty bag of experience and a lot of luck; the trick is to fill that bag before you're luck runs out"
 

·
The Guitar Hero
Joined
·
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, I just got the number for the MSF in my area. Most definately will be doing that before I start riding.

I'm not going to be going for a liter bike. It'd probably just sit and collect dust because I'd be terrified of it.

So even if you aren't a showoff and willing to take it slow the general consensus is to still start off older and slow? Should I expect the bike will be down at some point when learning?
 

·
Fasthawk
Joined
·
145 Posts
Even if you take it slow on your brand new SS, there's still cars that will pull out infront of you, cut you off, etc. Not everything is in your control. And for just starting out you don't have any experience with that. Most riders panic, and your first instincts are usually the last thing you want to do (like hit the rear brakes). New plastics cost a lot to replace and you'll more then likely experience atleast one spill. Get an older bike you can learn the basics on. Then you won't have to worry about dropping it. After 6 months or when you feel comfortable, get that shiny SS. You'll most likely break even on the cost or even make money when you sell your old bike.
 

·
-=R1der=-
Joined
·
371 Posts
I'd disagree on the dirtbike statment. I think it's two different worlds.
 

·
The Guitar Hero
Joined
·
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Alrighty then, older/slower it is.

I'm bummed I missed out on Morgan's bike. Bah.
 

·
Sheep on the hood...
Joined
·
511 Posts
A_spec said:
I'd disagree on the dirtbike statment. I think it's two different worlds.
Then you don't know what you are talking about.


Other than cars what is the next biggest cause of all accidents on bikes?
Take a guess..

Tossing around a bike and knowing how it reacts on other than a clean street is one of the MOST important skills you can learn.

Oil, sand, gravel, a cup of coffee..whatever.
The point is that knowing how your bike reacts and honing your reaction skill to a point of 'instinct' is core.



also, Yenny - AGAT

all gear
all the time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
A_spec said:
I'd disagree on the dirtbike statment. I think it's two different worlds.
Riding is all about 'control' - the control you learn on a dirtbike is VERY usefull if not priceless when riding a streetbike.

Yenny - that bike looks like a YZF600 to me
 

·
road hazard
Joined
·
452 Posts
A_spec said:
I'd disagree on the dirtbike statment. I think it's two different worlds.
A_spec, its true. dirtbike riding skills really help hone your sportbike riding skills. i'm sure at least 75% of the professional motorcycle racers in motogp, ama superbike, world superbike, etc. have some dirtbike riding experience.

althought they seem like 2 different worlds, one being on dirt and the other being on pavement, like what carolyn said, its all a matter of how much control you have. dirtbike riding takes a lot of control...you're constantly on and off the throttle to controller the rear wheel through turns. on street racing, you can use that skill to experience backing it in, late braking while controlling the throttle to the rear, etc.

nicky hayden didn't start on a dirtbike and make it in motogp for nothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I'm sure the reaction to junk on the road is important but I think the "right handgrip" control is more important. With a fast bike you can get into trouble faster than you realize and that is what takes time to learn.
Just my thoughts,
Len
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
861 Posts
slim313 said:
-2
You guys must've learned on the street then...
 

·
-=R1der=-
Joined
·
371 Posts
speedin89 said:
-2
You guys must've learned on the street then...
Yeah, I'm straight HOOD son. Keep it street, fo' real.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
861 Posts
Carolyn said:
Then you must not have learned anything in those 5 years....
+1,000...I learned MANY things, how it feels to bite it hard on 2 wheels was one of those things-I keep that thought w/ me every time i'm out railing...and I haven't joined the elusive crash club yet...knock on the fake wood grain in my GF's Chrysler.

And if you've never hit the floor on the dirt/trails...you're not riding hard enough!!
A spec said:
Yeah, I'm straight HOOD son. Keep it street, fo' real.
:rofl: Word to your mother
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Yenny said:
Ok, so here is my history.

No speeding tickets
No accidents
No nothing

So, I guess the question is should I still start off on say an older 500?

Is it generally accepted to start off lower because there are so many clowns out there who can't take it slow?
Or is it more of, no matter how careful you are mistakes will happen?
Should I expect even taking it slow that the bike will go down at some point?

If it is more than likely the the bike will be down, then I guess it makes sense to not ruin a nicer bike.

The main reason I'm asking is overall cost. Just assuming it would cost more to buy a lesser bike, learn, then move up. Obviously, it'd be a while before I'd feel comfortable on a liter so don't think I'm thinking that.
If you respect your bike and your own limits you'll be fine. My wife and I both started on new R6's and never had any issues. Just respect your limits and stay alert and you'll be fine.

Good luck!
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top