Supra Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two old AC compressors; no doubt they are R12 compressors. How would I fill them up with the new refrigerent? Is it possible to just fill it up and go?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
You want to hook everything up and put the system on a vacuum pump to make sure there are no leaks, especially if you are going to put R12 in, which is like $50 a pound. You also need a set of refrigeration guages so you know if the system stays in a vacuum, and you need to put a certain amount of oil in the compressor and the dryer which you should change too. I think the TSRM has those specs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
the best way to go is take the whole piping system apart and change all the o-rings to ones that are more compatible with the oil used with R134a. then after you have put it all back together you need a vaccum pump to get all the air and moisture out of the system before you put the new refrigerent in. if you skip the last part it will never work right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
Call your local Refrigerator repair guy and let him know what you are doing. He will have the R12 on hand and will also be able to pull the -40 vac to see if you system needs repair before recharge. This is also the cheapest way to go.

David
 

·
Captain Hammer
Joined
·
2,020 Posts
You don't pull -40 vaccum, as space is -30, you will pull -29 in vaccum. Also, if your local fridge repair man is charging AC systems without lisence to do so, he is violating federal law.
 

·
I Love Lamp...
Joined
·
2,184 Posts
I also do not think your local hvac guy can legally have R12... goodluck on that. R134 is the legal stuff.
 

·
Oldie but a Goodie
Joined
·
1,465 Posts
Take it to a shop. You shouldn't be messing with your A/C system without knowing what you're doing. This is one area I strongly am against DIY guys that haven't had any training. It is too easy to skip over problems with the system, waste money on lost refrigerant, and get yourself hurt in the process of making a non-working A/C system. Spend a couple dollars and let someone who knows what they're doing and has the proper equipment charge the system for you.

All it takes is a TIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINY little leak and all you've done will go to waste. However, the tools you need to check for leaks (unless you happen to have a portable black light and a pair of yellow glasses) are going to cost you the same as it would for the labor on having someone check everything over for you and know where to check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
raven97990 said:
You don't pull -40 vaccum, as space is -30, you will pull -29 in vaccum. Also, if your local fridge repair man is charging AC systems without lisence to do so, he is violating federal law.

I didnt remember the exact number (I did this 2years ago).

Also notice where I live.......Im not an American, hence, I cannot violate federal law.

David
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,731 Posts
I fix my AC system all the time when i tear it apart for various reasons.

I have a vacuum pump and snap-on gauges. I leave the pump on for 1hr. Then filler up with 2 cans of R134a. The system takes 900grams in my Soarer.. and two cans is like 750grams. I dont feel like wasting half a can for that extra amount, its ICE cold.
 

·
Oldie but a Goodie
Joined
·
1,465 Posts
VJ RC51 said:
I fix my AC system all the time when i tear it apart for various reasons.

I have a vacuum pump and snap-on gauges. I leave the pump on for 1hr. Then filler up with 2 cans of R134a. The system takes 900grams in my Soarer.. and two cans is like 750grams. I dont feel like wasting half a can for that extra amount, its ICE cold.
And how do you vent the refrigerant that was already in the system before you pull a vacuum on it?

If you just let it out to the atmosphere... well, don't say that because you can be in for some extremely hefty fines.
 

·
Can't wait for Spring!
Joined
·
2,364 Posts
Ya.. you'd really be suprised HOW STRICT the gov't is on this a/c shit... before i even touched my first a/c repair job at my toyota dealership, i was fronting my Federal and State Certifications to do so...

... We here this all the time.. "can you top off my a/c system.." or.. " i know its leaking, i just want it to last through the summer."

... and i take particular joy in telling them "absolutely not" and then going through the list of reasons why i will not...

Chrisco is very correct...

You have to "evacuate" the a/c system, clearing it of any remaining refrigerant... the system could blow HOT air and still have R-12 or R-134a in it..

then you draw a vacuum on it, usually if it holds -28, -29 for 10 min its good. If there is a small leak, you'd draw a vacuum, and inject dye.. a large leak.. well... look for it...

Then you add oil and charge the system.. the whole process is very clean, its meant to not release any refrigerant into the atmosphere..

Actually.. a little fun fact... ( someone correct me if i'm wrong) When R-12 or freon is mixed with air, it becomes combustable, and when combusted, one of the byproducts is phosgene -- a chemical weapon used in WWI that attacks the tissues in the lungs similar to mustard gas

ya-- i was right.. "One hazard of R-12 as a refrigerant is the health risk should leakage of the vapor come into contact with an open flame of high temperature (about 1022°F) and be decomposed into phosgene gas, which is highly toxic"
http://www.tpub.com/content/construction/14279/css/14279_206.htm
 

·
Oldie but a Goodie
Joined
·
1,465 Posts
jong said:
Actually.. a little fun fact... ( someone correct me if i'm wrong) When R-12 or freon is mixed with air, it becomes combustable, and when combusted, one of the byproducts is phosgene -- a chemical weapon used in WWI that attacks the tissues in the lungs similar to mustard gas

ya-- i was right.. "One hazard of R-12 as a refrigerant is the health risk should leakage of the vapor come into contact with an open flame of high temperature (about 1022°F) and be decomposed into phosgene gas, which is highly toxic"
http://www.tpub.com/content/construction/14279/css/14279_206.htm
This is because R-12, along with alot of the aftermarket A/C "enhancers" use propane, methane, and chlorine as a refrigerant.
 

·
Oldie but a Goodie
Joined
·
1,465 Posts
Racefiend said:
You're going to need an EPA approved evacuation/recovery device such as this one:

Not so funny. :1poke:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top