Supra Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone done a comparison on a Supra before and after installing an FMIC? I thought I read someone gained 40+whp in hot climate?
 

·
Enter The Supra
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
On stock twins at bpu levels, I only noticed about .2 of a sec. difference at the track, which would not translate into much power at all (much less than 40rwrhp). It really only is needed if you're going with apu and need it to support higher hp levels imo and depends on your setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
On stock twins at BPU I gained 2 mph in my trap speeds at the track with the installation of a Blitz FMIC on my last Supra.

So that is approximately 20rwhp.

I will definitely be installing one on this one soon as well.
 
Joined
·
8,181 Posts
FMIC definitely helps compare to the stock IC that is hidden behind the side of the bumper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
It's a passive device. You're not going to see any gains at BPU unless the stock IC actually is a physical restriction to airflow, which it is not. You will see "gains" if the ambient temperature causes the stock IC to heatsoak and therefore a FMIC would have been able to dissipate the very same heat levels without retarding timing and therefore horsepower. Believe it or not, the stock FMIC does a pretty good job of eliminating heatsoak at BPU levels except when ambient temperatures exceed approximately 70 F and humidity rises. In other words, a FMIC will keep detonation at bay (up to a certain degree) in the middle of the summer but during the other 3 seasons there is little (to nil) advantage to a FMIC over the stock unit at BPU levels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's a passive device. You're not going to see any gains at BPU unless the stock IC actually is a physical restriction to airflow, which it is not. You will see "gains" if the ambient temperature causes the stock IC to heatsoak and therefore a FMIC would have been able to dissipate the very same heat levels without retarding timing and therefore horsepower. Believe it or not, the stock FMIC does a pretty good job of eliminating heatsoak at BPU levels except when ambient temperatures exceed approximately 70 F and humidity rises. In other words, a FMIC will keep detonation at bay (up to a certain degree) in the middle of the summer but during the other 3 seasons there is little (to nil) advantage to a FMIC over the stock unit at BPU levels.
The problem here in Florida is that we have 4 seasons and they are all hot. It is above 90 degrees 8 months of the year:madf: .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
here is a good link I've discovered when I was searching on FMIC gains.
It's very technical and basically explains why toyota designers designed a SMIC for the supra and decided to place it on the side of the bumper with it's exit in the wheel well.

http://www.max-boost.co.uk/max-boost/intake/intercooler_2JZGTE.htm

Crossways knows his stuff! I know search is down but this has been discussed many times on the forums. Most of the time gains are seen because the condition of the SMIC and it's piping isn't in good shape. Leaky intercooler pipes and oil filled SMIC rob the car of power, not to mention get heat soaked alot sooner.

The only way to truly decide if you need a "better" intercooler is by measuring post intercooler temps as discussed in the article. If your SMIC is in good condition and doing it's job, chances are you won't see any real gains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
It's a passive device. You're not going to see any gains at BPU unless the stock IC actually is a physical restriction to airflow, which it is not. You will see "gains" if the ambient temperature causes the stock IC to heatsoak and therefore a FMIC would have been able to dissipate the very same heat levels without retarding timing and therefore horsepower. Believe it or not, the stock FMIC does a pretty good job of eliminating heatsoak at BPU levels except when ambient temperatures exceed approximately 70 F and humidity rises. In other words, a FMIC will keep detonation at bay (up to a certain degree) in the middle of the summer but during the other 3 seasons there is little (to nil) advantage to a FMIC over the stock unit at BPU levels.

would this FMIC with some bent fins be applicable to your comment about physical restriction to airflow? or will something like this not matter due to its size vs the stock SMIC. i guess i mean surface area. i hope i don't sound like a caveman...air hit IC better car go more fast


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
It's a passive device. You're not going to see any gains at BPU unless the stock IC actually is a physical restriction to airflow, which it is not. You will see "gains" if the ambient temperature causes the stock IC to heatsoak and therefore a FMIC would have been able to dissipate the very same heat levels without retarding timing and therefore horsepower. Believe it or not, the stock FMIC does a pretty good job of eliminating heatsoak at BPU levels except when ambient temperatures exceed approximately 70 F and humidity rises. In other words, a FMIC will keep detonation at bay (up to a certain degree) in the middle of the summer but during the other 3 seasons there is little (to nil) advantage to a FMIC over the stock unit at BPU levels.
I've read that with the FMIC even at the same turbo psi your turbo is working harder thus creating more HP. Therefore on 17lbs with a FMIC you car will be making more hp than 17 lbs with a SMIC. In additon, the FMIC allows you to safely boost to higher boost levels. Please correct me if I am wrong on either of these two points.

Beware of cooling issues if you plan to road race as that is what is holding me back from getting a FMIC, this summer at least.
 

·
Toyota Powertrain Guru
Joined
·
618 Posts
here is a good link I've discovered when I was searching on FMIC gains.
It's very technical and basically explains why toyota designers designed a SMIC for the supra and decided to place it on the side of the bumper with it's exit in the wheel well.

http://www.max-boost.co.uk/max-boost/intake/intercooler_2JZGTE.htm

Crossways knows his stuff! I know search is down but this has been discussed many times on the forums. Most of the time gains are seen because the condition of the SMIC and it's piping isn't in good shape. Leaky intercooler pipes and oil filled SMIC rob the car of power, not to mention get heat soaked alot sooner.

The only way to truly decide if you need a "better" intercooler is by measuring post intercooler temps as discussed in the article. If your SMIC is in good condition and doing it's job, chances are you won't see any real gains.
Interesting theory. Reality is it originally was a FMIC but because of concerns of engine overheating during the summer going across the El Cajon pass into Vegas, it was moved to the side of the car. Because a well designed SMIC could do the job, a FMIC was really unneccessary. Prototype engines had liquid to air and air to air in conjuction too. I posted this years back. How do I know? My friend at TMC was the aerodynamacist and told me over beers one night when he was out here.:wavey:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top