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93 baltic Supra single turbo
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Discussion Starter #1
Is chrome okay to put in my engine bay? I want to chrome it out but I heard chrome isn’t good in heat. Can someone give me an accurate answer??
 

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1987 Supra Turbo R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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I heard the same thing about valve covers and alternators growing up but never verified it scientifically. What are you wanting to chrome?
 

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93 baltic Supra single turbo
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Discussion Starter #3
I heard the same thing about valve covers and alternators growing up but never verified it scientifically. What are you wanting to chrome?
I was going to go with the engine cover and the strut bar and maybe some tubes and little accents that fit in. My trim color is orange, so I have an alternative either way.
 

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1987 Supra Turbo R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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I think the key would be chroming something that produces/radiates heat vs. chroming accessories or things like the strut bar.

I always heard that chroming things like diff covers, valve covers, oil pans, intake manifolds were bad for daily use, but objects like air cleaners, spark plug guides, brackets and the like were ok.
 

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93 baltic Supra single turbo
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Discussion Starter #5
I think the key would be chroming something that produces/radiates heat vs. chroming accessories or things like the strut bar.

I always heard that chroming things like diff covers, valve covers, oil pans, intake manifolds were bad for daily use, but objects like air cleaners, spark plug guides, brackets and the like were ok.
Yea. Would make sense. Thanks for the info!
 

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Game Over
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Chroming involves submerging the entire part in a solution and sending an electrical current through the part to plate it.

Unfortunately this also meant plating over any gaskets surface area of the part, and has caused me alot of headaches and problems, as the plating won't come out as flat as a raw machined finish.

My intake manifold was practically ruined because of this. I have done a boost leak test and it leaked so bad, that I had to try to have the surfaces machined flat to get an even surface again.

Even a cylinder head decking machine couldn't chip away at the chrome completely, and in the end I had to block sand it for hours after hours and after hours, and still had to use a little bit of FIPG to make up for the uneven surfaces.

My power steering reservoir was chromed, and since that is a more difficult part to prep on the inside, that also mean chrome flakes chipping off from inside the reservoir and clogging up the screen on my power steering rack.

I didn't even bother and just took my chromed valve covers off afterwards. It was a nightmare, and I didn't want to risk it.

The finish of chrome is absolutely beautiful with the right amount of prep work, and its low maintenance and has no swirl marks.

For what it's worth in my 100% honest opinion, I wouldn't ever do it again unless its a show car that is hardly driven. Lead time on getting parts chromed are also long on platers.

I've had issues with my first plater and sent it to another who was reputable and still came out with these issues. I've waited over 5 months each on both of these platers to have my parts done, and have dropped in over 1k to have it done combined, just to pretty much have all my parts trashed.
 

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1987 Supra Turbo R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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^ ^ ^ THAT goes beyond even the heat aspects of why I would steer clear on chroming personally(y)

Sorry you went through all that!
 

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93 baltic Supra single turbo
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Discussion Starter #8
Chroming involves submerging the entire part in a solution and sending an electrical current through the part to plate it.

Unfortunately this also meant plating over any gaskets surface area of the part, and has caused me alot of headaches and problems, as the plating won't come out as flat as a raw machined finish.

My intake manifold was practically ruined because of this. I have done a boost leak test and it leaked so bad, that I had to try to have the surfaces machined flat to get an even surface again.

Even a cylinder head decking machine couldn't chip away at the chrome completely, and in the end I had to block sand it for hours after hours and after hours, and still had to use a little bit of FIPG to make up for the uneven surfaces.

My power steering reservoir was chromed, and since that is a more difficult part to prep on the inside, that also mean chrome flakes chipping off from inside the reservoir and clogging up the screen on my power steering rack.

I didn't even bother and just took my chromed valve covers off afterwards. It was a nightmare, and I didn't want to risk it.

The finish of chrome is absolutely beautiful with the right amount of prep work, and its low maintenance and has no swirl marks.

For what it's worth in my 100% honest opinion, I wouldn't ever do it again unless its a show car that is hardly driven. Lead time on getting parts chromed are also long on platers.

I've had issues with my first plater and sent it to another who was reputable and still came out with these issues. I've waited over 5 months each on both of these platers to have my parts done, and have dropped in over 1k to have it done combined, just to pretty much have all my parts trashed.
Thank you for taking your time and giving me all the information! Truly helps and I’m sorry about what you went through!
 

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TheFastCoonAss
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6,082 Posts
Is chrome okay to put in my engine bay? I want to chrome it out but I heard chrome isn’t good in heat. Can someone give me an accurate answer??
Of course you can put chrome in an engine bay, with no issues. Think about how many Harley's run chromed exhaust systems. I had a bunch of chrome on my MKIII back in the day, even my turbo heat shield was chromed, never had an issue with heat.
251175
 
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