Supra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
Haven’t found much info on this and YES I used the search bar.. But I recently pick up a 2JZ-GTE VVTI from an importer after doing a compression test and visual inspection with everything looking good. After disassembling it to change the gaskets, I found quite a lot of grime under the valve covers and under the cams. I know that it’s a used motor and there should be wear and tear but is this excessive? What would be the best way to clean the sludge out from underneath the cams? Any help is appreciated, thanks!


251012
251011
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
That doesn’t looking like it’s had regular oil changes, if it was my engine I’d be completely stripping it and hot tanking the lot.

Have you come across any black sludge or gel like substance internally?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That doesn’t looking like it’s had regular oil changes, if it was my engine I’d be completely stripping it and hot tanking the lot.

Have you come across any black sludge or gel like substance internally?
Yeah there’s some black sludge underneath the cams. Haven’t seen anything else internally since I wasn’t planning on taking the head off. But I think I’ll probably end up tearing it down further and sending it off to be hot tanked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
My GTE-VVTi definitely wasn't sparkling new but my valve covers looked nothing like that. Definitely didn't get regular oil changes. I feel these motors suffer more than normal because the stock twins pump extra heat into the oil. I'm the 1st one to not want to take the head off a nicely sealed motor but that looks rough. Sludge shouldn't be anywhere near a race motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Yeah there’s some black sludge underneath the cams. Haven’t seen anything else internally since I wasn’t planning on taking the head off. But I think I’ll probably end up tearing it down further and sending it off to be hot tanked.
Have a Google of engine Black Death and see if the images match what you have found under the cams. Either way it’s much better to be safe than sorry, get it stripped and hot tanked for complete peace of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Camshafts can be cleaned with a solvent and something like Scotch Brite. At the very least, those need to come out because I guarantee that motor needs valve stem seals. With the cams, buckets, and shims out, you can probably clean that up pretty well with cotton swabs, and Seafoam. That's what I used when I did my valve seals a few months ago.

Those valve covers are atrocious though. After buying a used motor, putting allot of my own miles on it, I can tell you my covers didn't look like that. If it was in the car and on a tight budget, you could do that, plus change the oil and filter, and probably get away with it. With it out on the stand like that though, you might consider at least taking a peek underneath. Removing and replacing the pans is pretty easy, and it's just a gasket and some fipg if I remember correctly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
that doesnt look too bad. i've seen MUCH worse. i would pull the cams, replace the valve seals, clean up a bit and reinstall. valve covers can be cleaned with solvent.
Hello Supralover! I I was just wondering if you could take a look at my post as I am in the exact same situation? Any information from you is appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Hey Ryan, I am in almost the exact same situation as the OP, I was wondering if you could give my post a look and give me your opinion on my camshafts and head?
Happy to offer my two cents with stuff I have personally worked on, but I'm no authority on the issue, just a guy that works on his own Supra, and your situation might be different. I looked over your photos though, it looks very much the same as this thread, and could be cleaned up yourself.
The more you dig, the more you can always find to clean and replace. It's just the nature of the beast. But your compression numbers look fine, and I definitely don't see any reason why you would need to replace that engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Happy to offer my two cents with stuff I have personally worked on, but I'm no authority on the issue, just a guy that works on his own Supra, and your situation might be different. I looked over your photos though, it looks very much the same as this thread, and could be cleaned up yourself.
The more you dig, the more you can always find to clean and replace. It's just the nature of the beast. But your compression numbers look fine, and I definitely don't see any reason why you would need to replace that engine.
Thank you, I really appreciate your insight and am happy to hear that the engine is most likely in good shape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I purchased a set of used covers on an auction site. When they arrived they looked exactly like this, caked in thick burnt old oil. When compared to my 100,000km '96 RZ valve covers it's night and day. My covers were by no means spotless after 24 years, but significantly cleaner than the ones pictured above.

OP you're almost certainly going to want to drill the rivets out on the baffles to clean underneath. You can then tap the drilled out rivets to a suitable thread and threadlock it back together with bolts. Mine was caked to the point of blocking flow internally. This also makes it easier to add large lines for the catch can, especially if you're upping the factory power level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Camshafts can be cleaned with a solvent and something like Scotch Brite. At the very least, those need to come out because I guarantee that motor needs valve stem seals. With the cams, buckets, and shims out, you can probably clean that up pretty well with cotton swabs, and Seafoam. That's what I used when I did my valve seals a few months ago.

Those valve covers are atrocious though. After buying a used motor, putting allot of my own miles on it, I can tell you my covers didn't look like that. If it was in the car and on a tight budget, you could do that, plus change the oil and filter, and probably get away with it. With it out on the stand like that though, you might consider at least taking a peek underneath. Removing and replacing the pans is pretty easy, and it's just a gasket and some fipg if I remember correctly.
Yeah Camshafts will for sure be coming out, im just not sure on how far I want to go with it. I'm undecided between cleaning it myself or taking it to be hot tanked. Compression numbers were 170-180 across all 6 cylinders btw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
that doesnt look too bad. i've seen MUCH worse. i would pull the cams, replace the valve seals, clean up a bit and reinstall. valve covers can be cleaned with solvent.
That's a little reassuring. I'm thinking about making a homemade hot tank and just throwing the valve covers in there for a while..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I purchased a set of used covers on an auction site. When they arrived they looked exactly like this, caked in thick burnt old oil. When compared to my 100,000km '96 RZ valve covers it's night and day. My covers were by no means spotless after 24 years, but significantly cleaner than the ones pictured above.

OP you're almost certainly going to want to drill the rivets out on the baffles to clean underneath. You can then tap the drilled out rivets to a suitable thread and threadlock it back together with bolts. Mine was caked to the point of blocking flow internally. This also makes it easier to add large lines for the catch can, especially if you're upping the factory power level.
Thanks for the tip, i'm definitely going to want to try to remove as much of this gunk as possible. Nothing crazy but i'm shooting for around the 500-550hp range but i'm trying to take my time do it right the first time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I was running a GT3582R on a stock block JDM 6 speed car for nearly 10 years, it was only driven two or three times a year typically. It was running around 18psi and I expect the car was pushing around the 400-450rwhp mark, street driven but often hard. When I pulled the motor to perform the 100,000km service I found this...
251132
251133


The front main seal had been spinning in the pump and was only retained by about 1.5mm around the edge when I found it. The FMS had rubbed a groove into the back of the timing belt pulley nearly 1mm deep. At the time my crankcase ventilation was a 3/4 hose run from one valve cover to the 4" intake just after the pod filter. I didn't get compression numbers on the motor as I only intended to be doing the 100,000km service. The condition of the engine now it is disassembled gives me no reason to believe there was excessive blow-by on the rings. I did find the crankcase PCV to be passing air in both directions until I cleaned it out with degreaser.

I've come to understand just how important it is to vent your crankcase effectively if you want to keep your seals in. I dodged a bullet here, and I intend on not being shot at a second time. I'll be running large lines on the two sets of valve covers I've got for each engine build. Both are being disassembled completely (baffles drilled out and drilled and tapped) and having AN bungs welded on to attach them to a catch can. I know this is another thing to add to the expensive list of things to get your Supra back on the road... but I think long term it's a good safe option to make sure your bottom end can breathe when it needs to.

edit: Just found a great video of Mr Grannas performing this on youtube -
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top