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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I'm trying to find out more info about our stock LSD's,
And I seem to be finding conflicting information on these forums.

I just need some knowledge to set me straight :D

Are the MKiii LSD's Viscous or not?

Bishop92T said:
Cusco still sells a LSD for the Supra, it's rather expensive to put it mildly. It is still clutch based too which is retarded IMO, you'd be better off finding a junked LSD and having it rebuilt.
Are clutch pack LSD's the same thing as a viscous?
if so I read in another thread
terrible tO4e said:

also, the stock LSD in teh mk3 is kinda lame, but its better than a VLSD from nissan. if you are serious about this shit, get a real 2 way diff
What difference is terrible t04e talking about? I know for a fact that most of the Nissan sports cars have a viscous LSD.

So does that mean that we have a viscous LSD but the design is just better than the Nissan ones or what?

Any help/info/links appreciated.

Thanks....Sam
 
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if you are serious about this shit, go for either the ats or the kazz, as the cusco ones wear out fairly quicly so i hear, and the os gikken ones just get harder and harder to control

if you want more info, hit me up on aim

tom1025811
 

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Stock is clutch-type. Here is a quick cut and paste highlighting some of the differences:


With an open diff, torque is transferred to both wheels, with more going to the wheel spinning fastest. Since it is easier to spin a wheel that isn't gripping, that wheel gets more power applied to it, increasing any traction problems. A limited slip differential applies torque to the wheel spinning the slowest. If one wheel loses traction, power is transferred to the other wheel. A viscous limited slip differential uses a series of stacked slotted discs attached to the ends of each axle shaft, with silicon fluid between them. When one wheel loses grip, the discs coupled to that wheel will rotate quicker than the others. This causes friction between the two discs that heat up the silicon fluid. The silicon expands and pushes the discs together, locking them and transferring more power to the wheel with grip. Most stock Nissan LSD's , such as the 350Z, G35, and older Altimas (newer ones are open diff) are the viscous type. They are smooth but not as great at transferring power.

A mechanical limited slip transfers torque to the slower spinning wheel by using a spring loaded or cam actuated multi-plate clutch between the axles. Mechanical LSD's can be the most efficient LSDs but they can be noisy and rough in operation. Some Nissan trucks and Pathfinders use this sort of diff. Most aftermarket LSD's are clutch type as well. The cam actuated clutch type diffs can be classified as one way, 1.5 way and 2 way. The 1 way diffs work during acceleration. The 1.5 way diffs work slightly while the car is braking as well. A 1 way or 1.5 way works best on FWD cars or cars not used for hardcore road racing. The 2 way diffs work during acceleration and braking. Two ways work best for drag racing, hardcore road racing on high-powered cars and for drifting. The cams mounts in the differential over the pinion shafts and applies a wedging force to the clutch plates when the axles spin at different speeds. The cam profile determines if the diff is going to be a 1 way, a 1.5 way or a 2 way. The final type is the helical gear, which have longer angled teeth that can mesh two unparallel shafts. The stock 6 speed Spec-V's and Maximas, and the Quaife are of this type. These diffs use the fact that a spur gear can turn a worm gear but not vice versa, to provide the locking action. They are very smooth in operation and also have good locking capacity.

Phantom Grip, Nismo, Cusco, and Quaife all offer aftermarket limited slip differentials for the 1989-1998 240sx's for a few hundred dollars. Your other option is to replace your differential with a LSD model from another Nissan, about $300 at a junkyard. These are your easiest choices for a swap: all Canadian 240sx's and the 240sx's with Super Hicas had VLSD. You can also use the differential from a non-aspirated 1990+ 300zx- not the twin turbo version! The NA one has the same gear ratio (4.083:1) while the twin turbo one has a 3.61:1 gear ratio. One caveat- you will have to replace the output shafts on the differential so it will bolt up to the 240sx driveshaft because the bolt pattern is different. That will cost another $200-300. There are a few ways to check for the LSD's if you're looking through the junkyard. There should be an orange sticker on the differential that identifies it as an LSD. Otherwise, jack the car up, put it in gear, and spin one wheel by hand. An open diff will spin both tires freely, in opposite directions. With a VSLD, the other wheel will be more difficult to spin but spins in the same direction. This is a fairly straightforward install for most wrench monkeys but be careful- the differential is heavy! Support its weight with a jack to avoid getting crushed like a soda can beneath the tire of a semi truck. You also need to switch to LSD fluid or add an LSD additive after the install.
 

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I had a Kaaz on my prelude, it's a clutch type and it grabs super hard.

I have some helical OEM one now and it sucks compared to the Kaaz. But Clutch Types eventually have to be rebuilt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks alot for the info.

You guys are like information on TAP :)

So do any MKiii guys have any aftermarket LSD's? and what are your expiriences?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
satan_srv said:
I had a Kaaz on my prelude, it's a clutch type and it grabs super hard.

So what was the torque steer like in your Prelude?
 

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ma70ltd said:
So what was the torque steer like in your Prelude?
My prelude makes a lot of power for a 4 (270/210 flywheel) it doesn't torque steer so much as just burn tires all day. The front end just lifts right up when you drop the clutch and it loses traction, kinda sucks. When I had less power the torque steer was alright.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
drjonez said:
http://mkiiitech.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=40
Its a little known fact that the '80s toyota truck diffs use the same 8" (actually 7.8") ring gear. This opens a world of possibilites as far as diff ratio. Richmond Gear and others offer aftermarket ring/pinion sets for the truck diffs.

I am not sure about actual diff unit compatibility (splines, etc). I'd venture to guess the form factor is the same, but the output spline pattern may be different...
Hey drjonez, Just read your article.

Thought this might be helpfull to you, If you haven't already found this info.

forums.toymods.org.au

Just do a search for "diff series".

Theres alot of comprehensive information on Toyota diffs and how interchangable they are in between models, different bearings and splines etc.
The only problem you might have is Australian jargen versus American jargen ie we call a downpipe a dump pipe.

Hope it helps.

....Sam
 
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I have a Quaife on my Prelude. The transfer is smooth but you can feel it come on really strong...the OEM helical doesn't even compare..

BTW I have no torque steer either but our equal length half shafts help. FWD cars are limited by traction, but the LSD helps immensely in this area...

What I have noticed is for Road Racing helicals work better for FWD cars cars, but if you ever expect one of the wheels to come off the ground (like rally) or want to drift then clutch types are better in these situations.

One think you should be aware is the clutch type LSDs need to be rebuilt over time but heilcals do not.
 
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