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as far the shop goes, it will be a faily simple metal building w/12-14 ft. tall walls and brickwork about 4ft tall around it to match the house.

also, 3 roll up doors, 2 in the front on each end 1 in the back to draw air through the shop on those hot summer days.

any ideas on building the shop are also welcome.
Best mod to my Supra: new bushings all around. Car feels SO much sharper than any Mk3 I'd ever driven before. It's weird to say, because Mk3 is not exactly the first thing that comes to mind when you think sharp, responsive steering, but well, here we are.

Megan's Supra, we upgraded the headlights to the Diode Dynamics uh... HL1 led bulb replacements. I believe that is the part number for them. For the ease of installation (basically just orienting the bulbs correctly to optimize the factory housing), the light output is quite nice. Not quite as nice as the OEM HID setup in our LS400, but not too far behind.

Now... as for the shop, hoo boy. Finally something I can offer genuine advice! In 2014, we had our garage built, and while they were at it, someone decided to attach a house to it for some reason. It's a bit of an "L" shape due to the design of the house, but rough dimensions are 30x25 with the rear half being 17x24, give or take a bit. Housing and garages are a lot like cars, in my experience, in that you don't know what you want until you experience what works and what needs improving. To that end:

-Flooring. If at all possible, make it as level as possible. Why? Makes pushing disabled cars around a lot easier, not to mention alignments are possible with hub stands. Downside to a very level floor? You might have to gasp squeegee water out once in a while.

-Concrete. I'd recommend planning for a lift if you don't already have one in mind. Shop for the lift before pouring concrete, if possible, to get an idea of what you would do with it. If you get a four post, make sure it is wide enough for the widest vehicle you can see putting on there. I can't put my imaginary Ferrari on mine because it isn't wide enough. If you get a two post, make sure your concrete is of appropriate thickness and psi rating before pouring concrete. Are you getting this "before you pour concrete" part yet? Ok, good. Also get a quality epoxy (I believe ours is by Porter) coating on the floor before you ever move anything into it. You'll thank me later. Going on six years here and our floors still look fantastic, and cleanup is a breeze.

-Storage. I'll be building a loft for the garage as soon as I can get the Chevy out of there. Just need enough in my case to put the seasonal items like grill and snowblower away in the off season, and store fabrication materials and less frequently used tools. Cabinets can also work well for this.

-Lighting. I went with Feit 10,000 lumen 100w led bulbs. I can get you a part number if you're interested. I have six of them in my garage, and it's honestly better lit than most shops I've been in. We jokingly refer to it as turning on the sun haha. Seriously though, I warn people to close their eyes for a moment while I turn them on. This isn't to say spot lighting isn't necessary, but for a general setup, it works great.

Quick edit: Paint. Gloss white is your friend. Reflects light nicely, and cleans up easily. Plus, real easy to see where the spiders are so they don't surprise you haha.

-Parking. Depending on fleet size and intended use for the garage, give it some consideration on what you'll be putting in there... for example, one of our cars, it's a tight fit to open the doors on the wall side, because there's no recess area on that side.

-Outlets. I'd recommend a LOT, for the simple sake of convenience. Worth putting in a few 240v outlets as well, lot easier and cheaper to do when it's all being built. My recommendation would be to have a few separate circuits. If you have a decently large compressor, and somebody is running a vacuum while someone else is running a welder... well, you can see where I'm going with this. Also good for resale if that's ever going to be a consideration.

-Water. We have a hot and cold option on our hose outlet in the garage. This makes it pretty great for washing cars indoors, even more so if it is nasty outside. Drainage can be a consideration, depending on local regulations. If you can have a drain, great! If not, make sure your concrete is sealed and you have a squeegee. The epoxy floors can be quite slippery if wet AND soapy! Oh, and speaking of drainage and concrete, I recommend as small of gaps between concrete pads as possible, and sealing anywhere that water can run down. I have a pretty good feeling our driveway is going to start heaving eventually due to climate, and poor drainage considerations. One last thing on the water front, having a sink is great so you can wash up without getting the house dirty.

-Climate control. Not sure where you live, but where I live, winter is a thing for oh... 7 or so months of the year. It gets nasty cold here, so a heater was a fantastic investment that makes the garage comfortable year round. AC will come by way of a swamp cooler most likely. Specifics such as type and fuel will be entirely localized as far as what works for you. Insulation in the walls and ceiling goes a long way toward comfort.

-Music / entertainment. Never hurts to have a decent sound system in the garage, powered by a computer for research...

-Winch points. I wish I had thought of this before our house was built. Ever try to push a car up onto a lift, up a slight grade, by yourself? Pretty much impossible without help if you're typical human sized. Talked my neighbor into putting anchor points for a winch into his concrete forms when they were doing the walls. He will be able to straighten frames in there, quite useful for his hobby of derby... You might also consider ceiling mounted hoist attachment points.

That's about all the advice I have off the top of my head, for things I'd do if I were to ever start fresh. Garage Journal is a fantastic resource, but a word of warning, it is a VERY deep rabbit hole... If you have any questions about my setup or things I might have missed, let me know. :)

GaugeArt example...

And here I thought I'd seen some weird atmospheric conditions where I live... 300 degree intake air temps? Is this another one of those "exhaust recirculation" ideas that was floating around the internet years ago? :p
 

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Im fabricating, covers for the left ABS and Brake booster covers, bought a sheet metal bender , some pneumatic sheers and lots of rivets... this has been in the works on and off, I bought a Sony XAV 200 head unit, as saw one of the members here showing it off and i loved it, that it has almost the same tint as the surrounding areas and fits nice and snug, and i also did purchase a 1080p high resolution dime size reverse camera, that will fit into the trunk lock cylinder in the right tail light assy. which again , thanks to one of the members here ,(forgot his name - sorry) .
Another parts I've been working on with sheet metal and fiberglass, is fabricating air ducts for the front brakes, that will fit any front bumper OE or Aftermarket, which will be a bolt on affair , BMW and Porsche have nice designs for various model vehicles , so lots of trial and error to make them fit perfectly and last for years to come.
Anyone in the vicinity of Los Angeles , Burbank/La Cracenta and surrounding who would like to join me ? maybe we can work on some stuff ? PM me
 

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iSPOOL
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Is there a specific back up camera have you all purchased or have experience with? I plan to go with the Sony xav-ax210sxm.

Also, has anyone tried installing an "Auto" Up and Down function on the driver and passenger window? It's a feature on cars that I enjoyed but wasn't sure if it was feasible to install on the Supra.
 

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Is there a specific back up camera have you all purchased or have experience with? I plan to go with the Sony xav-ax210sxm.

Also, has anyone tried installing an "Auto" Up and Down function on the driver and passenger window? It's a feature on cars that I enjoyed but wasn't sure if it was feasible to install on the Supra.
im interested in all of this!
 

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Also, has anyone tried installing an "Auto" Up and Down function on the driver and passenger window? It's a feature on cars that I enjoyed but wasn't sure if it was feasible to install on the Supra.
Shady, I guess I never paid attention to Megan's car, I thought they had this on the Mk4's... all of my Mk3's had auto down driver side, and a very simple thing to modify the switch to auto up as well. Passenger side has no auto down (or up) for whatever reason though.
 

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iSPOOL
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Shady, I guess I never paid attention to Megan's car, I thought they had this on the Mk4's... all of my Mk3's had auto down driver side, and a very simple thing to modify the switch to auto up as well. Passenger side has no auto down (or up) for whatever reason though.
The driver side has the auto down function but no auto up. Passenger has neither auto up or down. Just wondering what it would take to modify it to be auto up and down for both driver and passenger sides. Our 2006 Scion TC, before it was totalled, had this function and wondered if it were possible to wire into the Supra.
 

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The driver side has the auto down function but no auto up. Passenger has neither auto up or down. Just wondering what it would take to modify it to be auto up and down for both driver and passenger sides. Our 2006 Scion TC, before it was totalled, had this function and wondered if it were possible to wire into the Supra.
Hmm, so it's just like a Mk3 then, function wise. On the Mk3 you have to pull the trim surrounding the switch out, then pull the switch off the panel, I think it's only two screws. There's a little tab that prevents you from pushing the auto down button to the up position. Snap off that tab, now you have auto up functionality. Wouldn't surprise me if other regions had this function without modification, but because America is so litigation happy...

Now to address the passenger side, I think you'd have to replace the whole switch assembly to integrate that. Did the SC / Soarer have auto down and up switches? Our LS has them for all four windows, and I think the UCF10 we had did as well, which was also a 1993 model, so if my memory is correct, Toyota had the technology back then. Either way, finding a switch that fits and looks like it belongs might be tricky.
 

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which year RX350 bi xenon hid should we use? is there any installation guide on how to go about it?
Need non afs projectors, theres a few ways you can do it, the best way is with a bracket kit which I'm not sure who sells anymore. I sold them for a bit but haven't had anymore made. @MKIIIHATER may know someone. Its not an easy straightforward install, a bit of trial and error will be involved if its your first one.
 

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which year RX350 bi xenon hid should we use? is there any installation guide on how to go about it?

Search for RX350 and you'll find a couple of threads with pictures from installs. The basic idea is to heat the lights up in a 250Fish oven, separate the lens from the light body, and replace the original mounting bracket with a bracket designed for the RX350 projectors. A little bit of custom work is needed (the RX350 projectors require a little trimming and some new hardware is needed), but it is a pretty easy retrofit. I got my brackets and hardware from Isaac, I'm not sure if he still sells them.
 

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Stock Twins King
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If you plan to run a modern Ecu with a CAN Bus system, you can run a GaugeArt. I was able to get rid of all of my extra wiring from external gauges, and simply wire in all the aftermarket engine sensors via the engine harness, and then hook up the GaugeArt via Canbus and double-din with a VGA input.

You can also switch back between the GaugeArt or your radio, but you cannot run them both at the same time.

You get to layout the gauges to your preference, and upload any image you draw up, and it has most channels that you need. Only downside so far, it is missing the Ethanol content channel, and it can be a bit finicky to setup online, but overall well worth it.

GaugeArt by Samson Wang, on Flickr

GaugeArt Testing by Samson Wang, on Flickr


I agree with everyone else's post about 3-spoke steering wheel, modern lighting, HID retrofit, modern ECU's, and VVT-i, ect.
This is awesome...why?.. because I have a HKS Camp2 displaying on my HU, and always thought there wasn't any replacement for it on the market. I just got a Motec M150 and I will have to see how to set up this can bus setup.

249118
 
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