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I dont plan on doing this and i dont want a how-to, i just want to know what the basic idea behind body kit molding is, what its purpose is, and how does it help...
 

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LS WON
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I know the purpose is too make the lines from where the body kit meets the stock car dissapare. If i got a body kit I would definatly have it molded . I don't think it is a do it yourself project though.
 

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Definitly not a DIY project. Not even a project to let a so-so body shop do.

I had mine done and although its not perfect, it looks so much better than unmolded.
 

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SupraForums Member
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I was thinking about doing it, but what if you want to change the body kit? Its not possible is it?
 

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It is possile but it is just more involved. You would have to paint all the panels that the kit was attached to.
 

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ELITECUSTOMBODY
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don't do it,i've molded dozens of kits on and still,i do not recommend doing it,i'm building custom widebody and still not molding the side skirts,cause that's where the quality is,anybody can slap bondo,fiberglass especially on kits that don't fit,that is the quick way out,and you may even get more point at shows for a molded kit (WOW!!)for shit that actually takes less time than making a kit to fit perfect at every corner and joint,but i think only a real proffessional will agree with me
 

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exvelocity said:
don't do it,i've molded dozens of kits on and still,i do not recommend doing it,i'm building custom widebody and still not molding the side skirts,cause that's where the quality is,anybody can slap bondo,fiberglass especially on kits that don't fit,that is the quick way out,and you may even get more point at shows for a molded kit (WOW!!)for shit that actually takes less time than making a kit to fit perfect at every corner and joint,but i think only a real proffessional will agree with me
I see where you are coming from but how many paople can really fit body kits properly? 2 shops tried on my genuine Veilside kit and it looked like crap compared to the molding. Also, good fitment can never look quite as good as molding IMO. To each their own though.
 

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exvelocity, even though I highly respect your opinions on body-work related topics, there is NO way you can get an unmolded kit with a seam between the kit/panel to look as clean as a molded in panel. There will always be a seam if you don't mold it in, no matter how god your body-work skills are.
 

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I think everyone does it differently. My shop used a combination of liquid fiberglass (nice way of saying bondo I'd assume) and fiberglass sheets. Others just use bondo and some even weld metal inside the gaps as filler.
 

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ELITECUSTOMBODY
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supralover93 said:
hey back to the question, how is it done? do you just fill the gap with bondo?
find a reputable shop ,and ask for few phone numbers of customers that had their kits molded and talk to them about pros&cons before doing it
 

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supralover93 said:
hey back to the question, how is it done? do you just fill the gap with bondo?
Depends on what's being molded. The metal can be cut and flanged and the part bonded in. Or depending on its thickness, the actual body part could be bonded on, roughly feathered to the metal, fiberglass applied around the feathered edges and then finished off with a quality body filler to further feather it in.

Note: Depending on what type of adhesive is used and how well it is applied would determine if fiberglass is needed around the feathered edges. If adhesive is liberally applied there should be no worry about the edges lifting after feathering.
 

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ELITECUSTOMBODY
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ATLSUPDAWG#2 said:
Depends on what's being molded. The metal can be cut and flanged and the part bonded in. Or depending on its thickness, the actual body part could be bonded on, roughly feathered to the metal, fiberglass applied around the feathered edges and then finished off with a quality body filler to further feather it in.

Note: Depending on what type of adhesive is used and how well it is applied would determine if fiberglass is needed around the feathered edges. If adhesive is liberally applied there should be no worry about the edges lifting after feathering.
also keep in mind,that metal contracts and expands different from plastic,bondo,fiberglass,so if the thickness of the filler,fiberglass e.t.c over the joint area is fairly thin ,you may see a line where two parts join, PM or e-mail Sherbaz ,he is a member on this forum and ask him about the rear bumper some shop molded for him
 
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