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Garage Queen Club
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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone using these?


"Moroso Crankcase Evacuation SystemsA great way to clean out your crankcase.

These Moroso crankcase evacuation systems reduce crankcase pressure throughout the entire rpm range for increased piston ring seal, reduced intake charge contamination, and fewer oil leaks. They have been track and dyno-tested to produce significant increases in engine performance
"

http://store.summitracing.com/egnsearch.asp?N=115+301022&D=301022
 
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Ive seen them on Ryan's and Dana's cars. I had planned on using this setup on my own car with some welded AN ends and braided hose.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What hose can you use to withstand high heat? And how durable are these things?
 

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1,150+ rwhp club
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Blank Man said:
Ive seen them on Ryan's and Dana's cars. I had planned on using this setup on my own car with some welded AN ends and braided hose.

ditto. It's on my to do list.
 
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I have a few friends in the domestic world that use these on their car. Supposedly add power since they help ensure the piston rings seal.

Im pretty sure any braided stainless line will work, they are meant for high temps.
 

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Getrag Gearhead
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These are much more effective on naturally aspirated engines than boosted engines. On NA engines the exhuast pulse carries a vacuum behind it and the reed valve creates a draw. On a boosted engine you have the pulse cancelled by the turbine housing and the flow from the downpipe is there as more of a flow. I suppose you can use it to evacuate the breather tank after the downpipe develops some flow but the crankcase will develop pressure before the breather starts to function. The system will finally start working more at redline. The best way would be to venting the other side to the atmosphere with another reed valve positioned to vent outwards. that way when the exhaust reed starts to pull a vacuum the other reed will shut and the vacuum will develop w/o any pressure buildup.

-Joe
 

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Yeah the VWE car has em. There was a thread not too long ago that shows a pic of it. Just behind the turbo there...
-Craig
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Decisions decisions...

1) Hook up both lines from valve cover to a baffled catchcan, vent it to air
a) No vacuum to siphone the vapors/blowby, but any pressure in crankcase will have a way to be relieved, as long as atmosphere pressure is lower than crankcase pressure (and your little catchcan filters aren't clogged)
b) Fuel/Blowby vapors infiltrate your cabin, car smells like a smog machine.

2) Hook up both lines from valve cover to a baffled catchcan, connect the exit path to inlet of your turbo
a) Vacuum from turbo will assist in removing blowby
b) Baffles in can will trap fluids, but vapors will still get past the can into the air inlet
c) Vapors still carry solids, overtime, turbo fins/intercooler will get sludged
d) Blowby lowers your octane rating

3) Connect both lines from your valve cover to one-way valves + reed valve into your exhaust
a) Exhaust will create some vacuum, but not much to suck in the vapors
b) At WOT, I'm sure your car will leave a trail of burnt blowby/oil stentch. Don't know how serious this really is.

4) Connect electric vacuum pump which voltage/speed varies by rpm signal
a) Can make it reach any vacuum level you like (15" if you want at full speed)
b) Vent it to a catch can, still need a breather, cabin may still smell like oil/blowby, but may be controllable

Looks like there is no way to get a good setup. I like #4 (vacuum pump) but I find it may be hard to locate a reliable cheap vacuum pump AND circuitry to vary the rpm. Otherwise, it seems to have the best pros over cons...
 
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