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Discussion Starter #61
We made some more progress this morning with finishing the rear end differential cover. Since this is a road race application we made provisions for oil cooling similar to the EU-spec Supra although with upgraded parts.

I happened to have a 6sp oem pumpkin with a TRD LSD kicking around so that is what will be tested first to see how it feels. There are lots of aftermarket diffs available that would be well suited to this application, but we'll see how the TRD behaves. I have it in my street car which has seen plenty of track use and overall I've been very happy with it.

Here is the cover being worked on the inside



Completed cover with oil cooling provision

 

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Discussion Starter #62 (Edited)
Some more test fitting happening. I had a custom carbon fibre drive shaft made up by the folks at the Driveshaft Shop. The part I really appreciate about this product is its ability to twist under heavy acceleration which reduces torque snap. This is especially useful coming out of corners where smooth engagement is important with this power level. There are other pieces of hardware, software where this can be controlled, but this is a great place to start. I also opted for a 82mm throttle body which, by our calculations, should help with overly sensitive throttle input. So, it's a combination of hardware and software in the end, but in my opinion it's important to start with hardware that works well and then use the software to dial it in to the driver's style.



 

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Discussion Starter #64
When I was working on dismantling the car I had a bucket of fasteners, bolts, washers, nuts etc. and was surprised as to how much weight was piling up. I never got a chance to weigh it all, but it was significant. So, when it came to planning what hardware to use for this project I decided on aluminum, and titanium for parts that required more strength than what aluminum could offer. The weight savings I estimate to be somewhere around 15kg (34lbs.) When you think about this weight being shifted laterally by a factor of say 2.2x then that number becomes significant. I basically just shaved somewhere around 34kg (75 lbs.) off through a corner. This is what really gets me thinking about the aluminum block as the result is very similar.

The next item I'm now looking at are the doors. We're stripping and cutting everything we can out of the factory doors to see how much we can get them down to. Depending on the final weight will determine whether I opt for carbon doors. My hunch though is that carbon will be significantly lighter still.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
A quick post to show the hardware being used throughout instead of the heavier oem variant. This is a mix of aluminum and titanium.

In the next couple of weeks I hope to make some good progress on the front end. That's by far the toughest space to work in with a straight 6 in place. Back in the day JGTC used 4 cylinders which made for lots of space to work around. We'll make it work just needs a lot of TLC.

 

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A quick post to show the hardware being used throughout instead of the heavier oem variant. This is a mix of aluminum and titanium.

In the next couple of weeks I hope to make some good progress on the front end. That's by far the toughest space to work in with a straight 6 in place. Back in the day JGTC used 4 cylinders which made for lots of space to work around. We'll make it work just needs a lot of TLC.

Can you post the list of hardware size, location and where your getting the hardware from? This would be something I wouldn't mind upgrading in the future in my car. Definitely an awesome thread!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #72
Sorry everyone! It’s going to be a while unfortunately. Other priorities right now so we’re not making any progress at this time. I’m thinking over the holidays I’ll have something to post. It’s the time of year where all of us are very busy. Enjoy the pre-Christmas season!! ???
 

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I always love seeing these track builds. Very awesome! JDilla, I doubt any hardware specs he uses will be very useful for most of us since he is changing so much, but where to buy would be your best bet, and just check the general sizing of the hardware you want to replace. Most areas of our cars use the same general type of hardware for each section, so it isn't a huge daunting task if you just make a list as you go through your car.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #74 (Edited)
I always love seeing these track builds. Very awesome! JDilla, I doubt any hardware specs he uses will be very useful for most of us since he is changing so much, but where to buy would be your best bet, and just check the general sizing of the hardware you want to replace. Most areas of our cars use the same general type of hardware for each section, so it isn't a huge daunting task if you just make a list as you go through your car.

Alex
Thanks Alex for chiming in. JDilla, Alex is correct. There are far too many changes for me to create a list, but it’s easy enough to work through what you have. Probolt sells all the fasteners. https://www.probolt-usa.com/
Good luck!

I wish I had updates for everyone interested.... After 15 years this build is killing me more than anyone can imagine ;)
 

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Can you post the list of hardware size, location and where your getting the hardware from? This would be something I wouldn't mind upgrading in the future in my car. Definitely an awesome thread!!!!
As stated, hardware sizing is easy with a few simple tools. I use a digital caliper, thread gauge, and tap/die set. Toyota used M6 x 1.00, M8 x 1.25, and M10 x 1.25 as their primary fastener sizes/thread pitches on these cars. Bolt length is measured under the fastener's head to the nearest whole number. I became quite accustomed to determining fastener specifications when I did the titanium fastener conversion on my engine. Let me know if you have any questions about measuring fasteners, and I'd be happy to assist.

Another note, in my experience, I recommend against using titanium bolts to fasten the intake manifold to the head. I had issues with the flange bolts I was using on my last setup loosening and requiring re-tightening between passes. I believe this is due to the bolts not being able to stretch properly. I believe studs will solve this issue, such as one of Speedfactory's titanium stud kits. Putting a thread insert such as a Timesert would solve this as well, although a much more labor-intensive process.
 

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Thanks Alex for chiming in. JDilla, Alex is correct. There are far too many changes for me to create a list, but it’s easy enough to work through what you have. Probolt sells all the fasteners. https://www.probolt-usa.com/
Good luck!

I wish I had updates for everyone interested.... After 15 years this build is killing me more than anyone can imagine ;)
Thanks for the very useful information from everyone on here.
 

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As stated, hardware sizing is easy with a few simple tools. I use a digital caliper, thread gauge, and tap/die set. Toyota used M6 x 1.00, M8 x 1.25, and M10 x 1.25 as their primary fastener sizes/thread pitches on these cars. Bolt length is measured under the fastener's head to the nearest whole number. I became quite accustomed to determining fastener specifications when I did the titanium fastener conversion on my engine. Let me know if you have any questions about measuring fasteners, and I'd be happy to assist.

Another note, in my experience, I recommend against using titanium bolts to fasten the intake manifold to the head. I had issues with the flange bolts I was using on my last setup loosening and requiring re-tightening between passes. I believe this is due to the bolts not being able to stretch properly. I believe studs will solve this issue, such as one of Speedfactory's titanium stud kits. Putting a thread insert such as a Timesert would solve this as well, although a much more labor-intensive process.
Great info! I will definitely reach out to you in the near future especially for your manifolds :biggrin:
 

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Discussion Starter #79 (Edited)
Hey everyone. Sorry for the lack of updates for a while. It's been a busy couple of months with other priorities..... you probably ask how can that be? :) We have made some progress which I will post with this update. We're nowhere near finalizing the exterior which I'm sure many would like to see. We're still working on all the internal functional parts. Once all that is done we can move onto the exterior which is the most exciting for me after all these years.

I haven't discussed the intake side of the motor yet. I ended up with a hypertune manifold a long time ago. It feels like forever ago and probably is. The throttle body is a Bosch unit found in the latest Porsche GT3 RS. A nice size for the application and solid reliability. No photo of TB. Will post later.



Test fitting of manifold.



Next is the front support assembly



A couple of random photos showing weight reduction anywhere we can find it. Hinges are bolted with aluminum hardware.





The next set of photos shows the turbo/wastegate return h2o tank, surge tank and vent tank.



Surge tank with fuel pump below it.



Vent



Finished transmission mount with titanium fasteners



Here is the rear subframe with test fitting of the differential. Everything looking good. We made a rear cover using 3D printing technology before committing to the aluminum version.



Here you can see a glimpse of the 3D printed rear cover. Not a direct bolt-on as you can see. We were more interested in clearance concerns.



Since everything is so neatly tucked up under the car and there is no exhaust to worry about we'll be able to cover the belly of the car with carbon fibre sheets giving it a flat bottom.

Here is a shot showing part of the aero work behind the rear wheels. We're channeling all the air behind the rear wheels straight out of the back. The rear mid section under the car will house ducting that will feed the oil cooler. This part is still being worked on.



Better view of the aero work being worked on in the rear.



Another angle from inside the right rear wheel well.



That's it for now. Off to a Christmas family function. Merry Christmas to everyone!! I'll post some more this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #80 (Edited)
A couple more photos to share. The ducting for the intercoolers were 3D printed originally. A bit heavy surprisingly. We decided to make molds so we can make them out of carbon fiber. Here are the molds being worked on.







This is it for a while. 'Tis the season to spend with family and friends so I'll be back in a couple of weeks hopefully with some updates. Have a great New Year everyone!
 
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