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i tried to search.. but the amount of times rebuild comes up on the search is crazy like

i have my engine sitting on a stand right now.. figured out what pistons i'm going to run. still on the fence about main's and rod bearings.

so anyway. this is my first rebuild and i was just wondering if there is a good web site or something that will walk through the important points of the build.

i can take anything apart and put it back together.. but what i don't know is things to look out for. how to know whether the crank needs a grind or just a polish. or how i can tell if the block just needs a lapping or if it needs a decking as well (same with the head). and how the hell do i lap a deck/head to get it ready for a metal head gasket.

again.. i need to stress that this is my first rebuild. so any tips would help ALOT.

and for those who think i shouldn't be doing it.. if i don't try i wont learn. so please leave those comments out.

(also hoping that if enough people reply this may turn into a good tutorial thread for people just starting out like me.)
 

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I've never done one but from what I understand it's always a good idea to swing your block and head by a machine shop while it's out. Sounds like you're doing a performance rebuildso bring it by there and they can give the head a quick shim and the block and they can tell you whether it needs it in the 1st place. But also might want to get the block bored out .02 or something, people say thats a good way to go on a rebuild.
 

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1.5JZ Turbo Supra
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i dont have any advice but i'm in your boat. so good luck, im just subscribing to this thread.
 

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Madd Tyte JDM yo ®
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ive built several motors...

pull the head off and leave it complete. take the ENTIRE head with cams and everything (not the covers or manifolds or thermostat housing or shits) to a cylinder head shop. they will disassemble the thing, clean it, inspect it and determine if it needs new valves, valve guides or reground seats. they will reassemble it w/ new valve stem seals as a minimum. but your options widly range from there if you opt for OS valves or upgraded valve train or even port work. they will also resurface the head as a standard.

take your short block apart, pull the rods/pistons out and set them aside, dont mix up the caps on the rods. when you take them out, put the caps back on the rods and the nuts back onto the rod bolts. then, you can take the crank out. do NOT mix up the main caps or turn them backwards. they should be marked and have an arrow on them. you should just leave them off and throw away the main bolts to avoid the temptation to reuse them. take a hammer and tap out the dipstick tube that protrudes thru the bottom of the block. take out the oil pump, pickup tube and the fitting that goes into the block. take your block, new pistons, old pistons/rods and new ARP rod bolts to the machine shop. dont forget your front case cover. tell them you want the block machined to fit the new pistons, have them hung on the rods you want to use, and have those rods fitted w/ the ARP rod bolts. once they are fitted, have the big ends of the rods resized. as far as the crank goes, have them inspect it and ask for micropolish. dont have it Ground unless its absolutely necessary. alot of times, the crank doesnt need to be ground unless you spun a rod bearing or main bearing. once the guy polishes the crank, he will re-measure it and he will know what size main and rod bearings to get. have HIM order the proper sized bearings, that way you dont risk ordering the wrong ones. also, make sure you take him the ARP main studs too. make sure he knows you are gong to use main studs and to have the main journals align honed for use w/ the main studs. and he will also mill the block for the new head gasket, bu tmake sure that he installs the front case cover, cuz they both need to be machined at the same time.

hope that helps.
 

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475RWHP 449TQ and climing
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flubyux2 said:
ive built several motors...

pull the head off and leave it complete. take the ENTIRE head with cams and everything (not the covers or manifolds or thermostat housing or shits) to a cylinder head shop. they will disassemble the thing, clean it, inspect it and determine if it needs new valves, valve guides or reground seats. they will reassemble it w/ new valve stem seals as a minimum. but your options widly range from there if you opt for OS valves or upgraded valve train or even port work. they will also resurface the head as a standard.

take your short block apart, pull the rods/pistons out and set them aside, dont mix up the caps on the rods. when you take them out, put the caps back on the rods and the nuts back onto the rod bolts. then, you can take the crank out. do NOT mix up the main caps or turn them backwards. they should be marked and have an arrow on them. you should just leave them off and throw away the main bolts to avoid the temptation to reuse them. take a hammer and tap out the dipstick tube that protrudes thru the bottom of the block. take out the oil pump, pickup tube and the fitting that goes into the block. take your block, new pistons, old pistons/rods and new ARP rod bolts to the machine shop. dont forget your front case cover. tell them you want the block machined to fit the new pistons, have them hung on the rods you want to use, and have those rods fitted w/ the ARP rod bolts. once they are fitted, have the big ends of the rods resized. as far as the crank goes, have them inspect it and ask for micropolish. dont have it Ground unless its absolutely necessary. alot of times, the crank doesnt need to be ground unless you spun a rod bearing or main bearing. once the guy polishes the crank, he will re-measure it and he will know what size main and rod bearings to get. have HIM order the proper sized bearings, that way you dont risk ordering the wrong ones. also, make sure you take him the ARP main studs too. make sure he knows you are gong to use main studs and to have the main journals align honed for use w/ the main studs. and he will also mill the block for the new head gasket, bu tmake sure that he installs the front case cover, cuz they both need to be machined at the same time.

hope that helps.

All too true flubyux2; However one point is missing that you need to know. The bearings will be different sizes if the crank isn't cut to one size say like .25mm called 10 under. This presents the problem of a newbie, or even a seasoned mechanic mixing up the bearing sizes, and getting rod knock. To avoid this each rod journal must have the proper bearings marked in some form or fashion. You can have him list the sizes for each one in oreder so you won't have this problem.
I think I should addd this to my thread on how to minimize rodknock.;) :bigthumb:
 

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JZA70 448 rwhp everyday
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make sure to get the proper degree hone in that block. Im not sure exactly what ross pistons call for, but be sure to get that right. Also clearance the rotating assembly 3times, 7ms are finicky, also clearence the oil pump. Last but not least, check the piston ring end gaps. Once you finally get it fired and running let it idle for a long time to check for leaks. I overheated my new engine 1 time cuz of a damn coolant leak, and I got totally pissed.

~scott
 

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Madd Tyte JDM yo ®
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anferny, yeah, you have a point. without thinking, i asked my machine shop to grind one journal to remove a flat spot that it had right near the fillet of the crank throw... they explained to me if they are going to grind one journal, they are going to grind them ALL to make sure the bearing sizes are consistant. any half-way decent shop will not grind just one journal and order one undersize bearing. its kinda dumb not to grind them all while its on the machine,and itll save potential headaches later on down the road.

and yeah, the 0.25mm = 0.010" undersized. usually the first step when grinding a crank.

both the past 3 motors i built were able to retain the STandard sizing. my crank specialist ordered the appropriate Clevite bearings which were all simply labled "STD". Clevite doesnt offer 5 different sizes like toyota does. when i buld the engine, i make positively sure that MY oil clearances do not exceed the higher of the specfied range. the Top end of the specified range is NOT the same as the Maximum allowable limit, for those that dont know.

for instance, if the specified range could be an oil clearance of 0.0012" - 0.0029" and the Maximum allowable limit could be 0.0043", then i make sure my oil clearances do not exceed 0.0029".
 

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slowest restoration ever
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scottiedawg66 said:
make sure to get the proper degree hone in that block. Im not sure exactly what ross pistons call for, but be sure to get that right. Also clearance the rotating assembly 3times, 7ms are finicky, also clearence the oil pump. Last but not least, check the piston ring end gaps. Once you finally get it fired and running let it idle for a long time to check for leaks. I overheated my new engine 1 time cuz of a damn coolant leak, and I got totally pissed.

~scott
It would be a good idea to rev the engine a little every so often while checking for leaks, just so you aren't keeping it at the same rpm for a long time.
 

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JZA70 448 rwhp everyday
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Breaking in an engine and letting it idle after its 1st fire up ever are totally different subjects.


~scott
 

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67mm of pleasure
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Is all of this applicable to any engine, or is most of this stuff 7m specific (besides the specs/sizes)? I will be doing this to my 1j sometime in the next yr and am learning like everyone else on here is. Its all really helpful.
 
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MEASURE EVERYTHING TWICE

Make sure it all with in specs. You dont want to get new parts and start your motor up and boom you have problems right off the bat be careful
 

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Madd Tyte JDM yo ®
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front case cover is the aluminum thing that bolts to the front of the block. and then the pullies and timing belt stuff goes on top of that.

letting the motor idle for an extended period of time is not good. you should just raise the idle right away and hold the RPM's up after cranking for an extended period of time to ensure that oil pressure is built up. once you get it started and running, rev it up and down. in fact, crack the throttle so the rpm's rise up, once it gets up to 4000, cut the ignition and let the rpms fall off. itll be cool.
 
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