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I love sequentials!
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
http://www.blinder-il.com/

[edit here is the USA site for the exclusive importer/distributor here in the states - http://www.blinder.us/ ]

I've had the m25 blinder xtreme laser jammer since 11/07.

I figured it was about time to write a review, as it saved my butt again last night.

I can name 4 specific occasions where it has saved me from a laser ticket that would have been 20-30mph over the limit, the most recent being last night on an interstate when I was going 90 in a 65. I know it works not only because I haven't been ticketed when I was very deserving of it, but also because the officer will continually shoot me with laser for 5 or 10 seconds, when he should be able to pull the trigger (like a rifle) and obtain a speed immediately. 3 out of the 4 situations have been late at night (apparently laser is becoming increasingly popular at night) where I was the only other car on the road.

To sum it up, this product definitely works, it's well worth the $350 to $400 dollars and is flat out awesome, it will most likely pay for itself after it's first save.

Mine is mounted in the grille of my daily driver (05 Corolla), I don't have pics, or I'd post them up.












 

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I love sequentials!
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Discussion Starter #3
I got mine from a seller on Amazon.com

I believe they are physically manufactured near you in the Netherlands, you might be able to order direct from them?
 

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Boost Junkie
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Where would you mount it in the Supra?

Steve
 

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I love sequentials!
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Discussion Starter #5
In the directions, they want both sensors somewhere between an 18" straight line of the headlight and the front tag, as the primary laser reflectors are the headlights and front tag




Where would you mount it in the Supra?

Steve
 

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good review and thanks for the heads up man. the problem in my area and most of the areas around me is that the cops dont use lasers, in PA, the only police that are allowed to use lasers are the state police. so the problem is that unless you are on the interstate or a major highway, one of these wont do you any good since the local cops use VASCAR and other methods that are based on timing. its always good to get reviews on how good these thing are tho.
 

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ESE CULO
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Hahah bushes saved me today. Was hitting 80 on the on ramp, only to see two bikes off to the side with guns out. I need to get one of these! Only worried though, what will a cop do if he suspects you have a jammer? Or can't get a signal and your obviously speeding?
 

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Those charged with speeding will only get a censored version of this "prime time justice": Pennsylvania law does not allow these defendants to plead their case to the jury of their peers. Speeders must do with a Judge.

Our man prepared for his trial by researching literature about VASCAR and Pennsylvania law about speed enforcement.

VASCAR (Visual Average Speed Computer and Recorder) is really a stopwatch coupled with a calculator. Once a distance is entered, the operator pushes a button to start then stop the stopwatch. VASCAR displays the speed calculated from the distance entered and the time measured.

Thus, a VASCAR measurement depends on human input. Therefore, in order to make a VASCAR measurement as accurate as possible, the observer's/operator's reaction time must be as short as possible. (Reaction time is defined as "the time interval between an input signal (physiological) or a stimulus (psychophysiological) and the response elicited by the signal.)

What is considered "normal" human reaction time? First, let's take a look at the best: Drag racers. Average reaction time of (Top Fuel) drag racers at the 1997 U.S. Nationals was 0.124 ± 0.082 second. Imagine that our cop running VASCAR is a super cop, with drag racer like reaction times: What kind of error is introduced into the VASCAR speed measurement by a reaction time of 0.124 second? With the numbers testified to by our cop
 

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you know, this info above is something that ive been saying for years, VASCAR is simply unreliable in a court of law due to the fact that the accuracy is due to the particular officer administering the test. so how can that hold up in any court of law ??? if i ever got a ticket based on vascar, i would argue human error simply because no person in the world could get it perfect so each violation is simply a best guess.
 

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Those charged with speeding will only get a censored version of this "prime time justice": Pennsylvania law does not allow these defendants to plead their case to the jury of their peers. Speeders must do with a Judge.

Our man prepared for his trial by researching literature about VASCAR and Pennsylvania law about speed enforcement.

VASCAR (Visual Average Speed Computer and Recorder) is really a stopwatch coupled with a calculator. Once a distance is entered, the operator pushes a button to start then stop the stopwatch. VASCAR displays the speed calculated from the distance entered and the time measured.

Thus, a VASCAR measurement depends on human input. Therefore, in order to make a VASCAR measurement as accurate as possible, the observer's/operator's reaction time must be as short as possible. (Reaction time is defined as "the time interval between an input signal (physiological) or a stimulus (psychophysiological) and the response elicited by the signal.)

What is considered "normal" human reaction time? First, let's take a look at the best: Drag racers. Average reaction time of (Top Fuel) drag racers at the 1997 U.S. Nationals was 0.124 ± 0.082 second. Imagine that our cop running VASCAR is a super cop, with drag racer like reaction times: What kind of error is introduced into the VASCAR speed measurement by a reaction time of 0.124 second? With the numbers testified to by our cop
you know, this info above is something that ive been saying for years, VASCAR is simply unreliable in a court of law due to the fact that the accuracy is due to the particular officer administering the test. so how can that hold up in any court of law ??? if i ever got a ticket based on vascar, i would argue human error simply because no person in the world could get it perfect so each violation is simply a best guess.
It really depends,

add the additional time for the human reaction and subtract one seconds because he was ansy.

It's accuracy is dependant on the time (the longer the time the more accurate) but more importantly on the vantage point as that will cause issue with when did the car cross the line. The more accurate the reading will be, even with a statistical over/under included of the human reaction time.

ie

the VASCAR distance is 1000 feet.

let say they clock you covering those 1000ft at 8 seconds.

That will be 125ft/s which we need to multiply by 3600 to get per hour.

125ft/s x 3600s = 45,000ft/hour / 5280ft/mile = 85.277 mph

so he was quick on the draw.......

1000ft in 7 seconds = 142.85ft/s * 3600s = 514285ft/hr / 5280 ft/mile = 97.8 mpg.

Funny thing is if he slows down by one second instead of speed up.

Speed is clocked at 75mph.

Now increase the VASCAR measuring to 2000ft.


2000ft/16s = 85.27 mph
2000ft/15s = 90.9 mph
2000ft/17s = 80.21 mph

so in this case, a court would take that as admissable even factoring a SLOW as reaction time of 1 second from the measured 16 second to 17 seconds, you were above the speed limit.

The math, even through an imperfect person, is hard to argue against.

And if the distance are greater, try as hard as you try, not happening.
 

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It really depends,

add the additional time for the human reaction and subtract one seconds because he was ansy.

It's accuracy is dependant on the time (the longer the time the more accurate) but more importantly on the vantage point as that will cause issue with when did the car cross the line. The more accurate the reading will be, even with a statistical over/under included of the human reaction time.

ie

the VASCAR distance is 1000 feet.

let say they clock you covering those 1000ft at 8 seconds.

That will be 125ft/s which we need to multiply by 3600 to get per hour.

125ft/s x 3600s = 45,000ft/hour / 5280ft/mile = 85.277 mph

so he was quick on the draw.......

1000ft in 7 seconds = 142.85ft/s * 3600s = 514285ft/hr / 5280 ft/mile = 97.8 mpg.

Funny thing is if he slows down by one second instead of speed up.

Speed is clocked at 75mph.

Now increase the VASCAR measuring to 2000ft.


2000ft/16s = 85.27 mph
2000ft/15s = 90.9 mph
2000ft/17s = 80.21 mph

so in this case, a court would take that as admissable even factoring a SLOW as reaction time of 1 second from the measured 16 second to 17 seconds, you were above the speed limit.

The math, even through an imperfect person, is hard to argue against.

And if the distance are greater, try as hard as you try, not happening.
But the best reaction times that a pro drag race is still 1.5-1.8 that would make it even worse right?
 

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But the best reaction times that a pro drag race is still 1.5-1.8 that would make it even worse right?
Did they go out, get coffee, read the news paper and take a crap? 1.5 RT is called sloth like reflexes.

What "pro" drag racing are you talking about?

http://www.motorsport.com/news/article.asp?ID=352269&FS=NHRA

motorsport.com said:
Today she also advanced to the final after she executed a spectacular reaction time of .006 (.000 is perfect)
pro drag racers reaction time are some quick RT. Anything quicker than a .000 and they get a fat red light.

If any of those guys at that level would have a 1.5 second RT. they would not be "pro's" for very long. ;) They usually cuts sub .3 second RTs.
 

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I love sequentials!
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Discussion Starter #16
Might as well keep logging these

Another save tonight, from a 45 in a 25 (didn't know a 4 lane road could be 25mph :scratch: ? )
 
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