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Here is the contact my old prof gave to me for that spray-insulation I referred to in my post above:

Rich Kraft
Capstone Mfg.
18225 47th PL NE
Seattle, WA. 98155
USA
phn 206 363 5010
fax 206 364 5183

- Show quoted text -
A. F. Emery Professor of Mechanical Engineering and
Adjunct Professor of Architecture and Industrial Engineering


I am going to contact this Capstone Mfg. group. But this would be something I want to use as a noise insulator and not a vibration dampener. After researching secondskinaudio I see that "spectrum" is supposed to dampen vibrations in the sheetmetal of your car.

I also want to first try spraying my wheel wells with this "spectrum" product before doing any work inside the vehicle. I would like to see how much this reduces road noise transmitted from the wheels. Just need to get some time to try it out.

Has anybody used Spectrum on their wheel wells before?

cheers
-Anders
 

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Here is the contact my old prof gave to me for that spray-insulation I referred to in my post above:

Rich Kraft
Capstone Mfg.
18225 47th PL NE
Seattle, WA. 98155
USA
phn 206 363 5010
fax 206 364 5183

- Show quoted text -
A. F. Emery Professor of Mechanical Engineering and
Adjunct Professor of Architecture and Industrial Engineering


I am going to contact this Capstone Mfg. group. But this would be something I want to use as a noise insulator and not a vibration dampener. After researching secondskinaudio I see that "spectrum" is supposed to dampen vibrations in the sheetmetal of your car.

I also want to first try spraying my wheel wells with this "spectrum" product before doing any work inside the vehicle. I would like to see how much this reduces road noise transmitted from the wheels. Just need to get some time to try it out.

Has anybody used Spectrum on their wheel wells before?

cheers
-Anders


http://www.capstonemfg.com/default.htm
 

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So Rich emailed me back. Here you go:


Anders,

You weren’t one of those guys in the back of the class laughing at me were you? I was nervous that day.

Yes, by all means. We actually market our product under 2 names; TC Ceramic, for industrial applications, (about 98% of our business), and CoolCar Ceramic, for the street rod market. It’s used mostly on the firewall and headliner as a thermal barrier, but it’s also used on the door panels and trunk areas for acoustical insulation. The coating absorbs just about any type of energy, whether its heat or force or sound.

Thanks

Rich



Here is the site for CoolCar ceramic.

http://www.coolcarceramic.com/about_us.htm

I would be interested to research this company a bit more before I start sound-deadening my car.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Thanks guys!
 

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Nice Project as everyone has said. Please consider changing your front BFG KDW tires. They were too damn loud for me. I swapped mine out for a pair of Michelin Pilot Super Sport on the front and road noise is significantly down.
 

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So this thread inspired me to try it as well. Contacted the guys at Second Skin and they set me up nicely. Not nearly as nice as the OP's but after I put her back together I can tell a significant difference.

I left my rear seat out because I am working on a delete also but for now I am liking the setup. I may at a later date try to add a little bit more depending on where I can hear different noises from while driving.

















 

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Coming from a degree'd sound engineer, anyone considering doing this look into MLV (Mass Loaded Vinyl) it is the thinnest material that has the highest DB reduction of any currently available material at over 40db STC rated. I have personally seen over 73db if coupled with lightweight concrete or high density foam. Mass kills sound, and seals kill sound.

Article explaining this here: https://www.soundaway.com/mass-loaded-vinyl-noise-barrier-s/31.htm

Article generally explaining sound proofing: https://acousticalsolutions.com/sound-blocking-proofing/

There is nothing including any dynamat products that perform like MLV. It is heavy but it absolutely works and is only 2mm thick. They have 1#(lb) thinner versions for flexible areas and roof and 2# for floors and wheel wells. I second that poster talking about the spray foam in hollow cavities. Also not mentioned, If you put a 3" thick foam ring around your wheels inside your tires that will drop road noise by over 6db as well. I have a degree in engineering and design studios so I am aware of materials at certain frequencies will do what. The only thing that will work is attention to ALL of it. Half done, half addressed applications you are wasting every dime of your money doing this, don't even take it on unless you are going for all of it like the OP has. I also second the opinion about BFG being louder than all other brands. I switched from BFG SS to Michelin AS3+ and it was over 6db just from Michelins no foam in the tire.

One more thing not mentioned, you may want to look at your weatherstripping, because sound is air, if there is air gaps in your doors, and firewall, hatch, targa, gas tank, EACH leak can drop your car's STC insulation rating by over 20db. In a studio, ONE single leak will ruin the sound isolation by 20db or so depending how big it is... Just remember this, SOUND is AIR. Seal for air you seal for sound. Just going around your bare interior with a caulk gun will do wonders. Seal every orifice and crack. Cheap and easy to do. Replace worn weatherstripping, have a body shop adjust panels that don't make contact. How you know when you are there; when you close your door the cabin will pressurize a little bit.

Another cheap trick is high density polystyrene or Visco foam green glued to MLV. Rolls Royce used both of these techniques in the new Phantom with a 5db improvement over the old Phantom.

You can also paint LINEX or bed liner inside the wheel wells on the metal above the liners. I would put MLV there and coat it if I was doing it. The less sound that gets into the cabin, the less you have to keep from coming in with interior deadening.

One last trick that works and is lightweight, is having the MLV coupled with something soft foam to another layer of MLV to create Hard to soft to hard decoupler. It is hard for sound to transmit through a dense material, go through an absorbing soft material then go through a dense material again so on and so forth... The energy is shed in the layers of hard and soft a bit more than just mass or just absorbing. This is typically not effective or used for studios, because we usually have huge space to deal with, but cars do not have the luxury of 1 foot thick wall gaps to increase the STC rating.

I would make a 2# MLV wall around the whole wheel well on the inside sealed behind the suspension. I would also make a flat bottom removable panel with a sheet of 2# MLV glued to it to improve aero and drop the noise of the road. You will have to ventilate, heat shield and take care that you don't let the exhaust touch anything, I'd probably wrap it all the way back to the canister. No fires lol.



Just giving you ammo to plan out your future builds as mild or wild as you want.
 

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I noticed the rear vents were covered. Where were you venting the cabin to? I think a lot of us recall seeing the door fly off at speed on another car. And many have had this happen on Lexus vehicles that taped the vents closed because of exhaust fumes. I'm just curious if you've done anything to vent the cabin. As a pilot I can just imagine the ∆P in the cabin at higher speeds with outside air selected.

I left the rear vents open, as designed and lined the fender sheet metal and the whole combination has been a tremendous improvement. Very low undesired noises and heat, and all the good stuff.

Just my $0.02
 

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Discussion Starter #72
I noticed the rear vents were covered. Where were you venting the cabin to? I think a lot of us recall seeing the door fly off at speed on another car. And many have had this happen on Lexus vehicles that taped the vents closed because of exhaust fumes. I'm just curious if you've done anything to vent the cabin. As a pilot I can just imagine the ∆P in the cabin at higher speeds with outside air selected.

I left the rear vents open, as designed and lined the fender sheet metal and the whole combination has been a tremendous improvement. Very low undesired noises and heat, and all the good stuff.

Just my $0.02
Vent is open. My doors wouldn't close with out it.
 
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