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1987 Toyota Supra
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a 1987 Toyota supra. I bought it in southern California by the border it was a track chassis: stripped interior, lightweight panels, all aftermarket suspension. I then bought a 2jz-ge vvti from a guy up north. Took it to my buddies at HPS (in Ontario, CA) tore it down, decked the block to 5⁄1000, overbored the cylinders to fit 86.5MM pistons (P#: SC7472) bought ARP main studs, and the REAL ST billet main caps, eagle rods, and the stock MLS head gasket. I've learned so much from researching and interning at HPS. My goal is to make 600-800 HP, I also haven't forgotten about the head. I have 264 BC cams, BC adjustable cam gear, 1200cc deatschwerks injectors, LQ9 Coil conversion, Billet intake manifold, Manley Valve Spring & Retainers, Ferrea Intake & Exhaust Valve Guides, GSC Chrome Polished Intake Valves, GSC Super Alloy Exhaust Valves, Ferrea 6mm Intake & Exhaust Valve Stem Seals. This has been a project of mine for 2 years now and I've finally come around to assemble the block. I have the tools: Piston ring compressor, piston ring grinder, snap-on digital torque wrench (dads), and filer set for rings. So far I've painted the block and am doing the bottom end. I wanted to ask those on the forum for help to make sure I'm not doing anything wrong or there's a common misconception with the 2JZ that I haven't thought of or heard. Let me know of any advice you can give me anything helps! thanks
 

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For 600-800hp you sure overbuilt the hell out of it.
The billet mains, ARP main studs, LQ9 coils, and literally all of the headwork except for the cams and valve springs + retainers are all wildly in excess of what's needed for your HP goal. The intake manifold is optional as well for your goals, but most do it for looks and simplified IC piping regardless of HP level.

Other things that immediately jump out to me:
-Do you have a rear sump oil pan setup for the 2JZ? The front sump pans that almost all of those engines come with will not fit a Supra's engine bay.
-Did the block get line honed with the new billet mains? That is expensive work and necessary for billet mains.
-Did the block get overbored with a deck plate installed?
-Did the overbore match the exact dimensions provided by the piston manufacturer for that overbore?
-Any plans for an upgraded oil pump, billet timing belt tensioner bracket, or Fluidampr/ATi crank damper? If not, then you should. PHR for the oil pump and t belt bracket, Fluidampr for the crank damper would be my choices.
 

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1987 Toyota Supra
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do not have a rear oil sump, didn't know I needed a line hone, deck plate was not installed, pistons are exactly overbore for piston manufacturer, I have the GTE oil pump also planning on getting billet tensioner and ati crank dampener. I'm going to call my engine guy tomorrow morning to see what's up w the line hone. thanks again man
 

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I do not have a rear oil sump, didn't know I needed a line hone, deck plate was not installed, pistons are exactly overbore for piston manufacturer, I have the GTE oil pump also planning on getting billet tensioner and ati crank dampener. I'm going to call my engine guy tomorrow morning to see what's up w the line hone. thanks again man
Specifically, you'll want the PHR upgraded GTE oil pump or one like it. Part of the upgrade process is porting out the pressure relief so higher RPM doesn't cause excessive pressure at the front main seal. If you're planning on regularly revving higher than 7500-8k rpm (which the rest of your parts easily support) then get an upgraded oil pump.


If it hasn't been line bored yet - I'd skip it and sell the billet mains BNIB to offset your costs.
Billet mains are needed when you're going above ~1000-1100whp or ~750-800ft-lbs of torque, whichever comes first. Lazier, laggier big-ass turbos are easier on bottom end parts, small modern turbos set to 'FUCKIN' SEND IT' boost all the time tend to hit that torque limit before the HP limit. Most of the easy transmissions for a 2JZ MKIII swap can't support those kinds of torque or HP levels anyway.

Get your build happening first. It's far too easy to just throw a whole catalog of parts on a credit card and stack up a pile of parts you may or may not need. Decide on a transmission option that works with the MK3, a brand new R154 from Driftmotion is an easy button, get a clutch that'll hold your target HP, and start getting your oil pan set and engine brackets and all that other stuff you'll need for a JZ conversion. Get all that stuff bolted together and sorted out. Then choose an EMS and get the wiring harness built and get all that done. Then finish your turbo & fuel system sorted out to support your target HP easily. Then finish the other 'easy stuff' like the intercooler setup, radiator and radiator fans, PS pump hoses, suspension, brakes, exhaust, etc. Then you'll have a running car.

Much better to have a running car that makes 400hp than have 1000hp worth of parts piled up in a garage or storage unit. Trust me, I know... I learned that the hard way!
 

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1987 Toyota Supra
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What's the max hp the stock main caps can handle? that was my main concern.
 

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The rule of thumb that I've heard for Stock vs Billet mains, is that usually when you go over 1khp to the tire is when you replace them. There are cars running happily at 1k to the tire with fully stock bottom ends, not just stock mains. As long as you have a bigger, slower spooling turbo that won't kill your rods at 2250rpm, 10 other things are gonna fail before the stock mains do. Especially with ARP main studs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What kind of turbo should I get then? Like I said I'm super new to engine building and am taking every precaution. Again I really appreciate all the help. :)
 

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IDK, depends on how drivable you want it to be, how much you want to spend, etc.
I would take a look at any of the turbos in the 6766 ~ 7175 range. I've heard really good stuff about the BorgWarner S366. I've also met people that are using VSRacing 7875s on JZs with great results. I would say go with the BorgWarner if it were me. You can order them with a center housing from .63ar up to 1.27ar. I would also take a look at Precision, Garrett, all the other big turbo makers.
 
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