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once you sit in that supra again (knowing the roof comes off) the 4 attachment bolts will stand out right at you

in the trunk there are holders for the sport top. it clips in the two behind the rear seat and then the studs go into the 2 by the rear trunk area. like the top is suspended 6" above the trunk floor and clipped in solid.



Im rooting for this swap because I like seeing different powerlines in the car.

might as well have a carb, its a hemi right. makes it simpler to run a big cam too i bet

from the outside looking in though, that six speed would be desirable in so so many ways.


here is a clip. I have no sound on the pc im using atm so if these guys are a bunch of hosers my bad

 

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Please write your responses outside of the quote itself. I can't quote your response if you do that.

That said, dude, if you're unprepared to go with a vastly better transmission because an R154 is somehow way easier, when you're swapping a big ass non ideal V8 into a car never designed for it already... not sure what to tell you dude.

Having seen countless projects like this start and never finish over the years, I think you need to honestly self-assess and decide how much you want this to succeed vs how mechanically weird you want it to be to 'be different' which doesn't mean a goddamn thing anymore.
I'm currently serving in the Middle East and the guy that owns American Racing (the header company) brought a Hellcat Swapped Prius to goddamn Kuwait for fuck's sake. It doesn't turn heads anymore to build weird shit.

What WOULD turn heads, especially with your goals, is to build a competitive, driveable, and maintainable combination for road racing a MK3.

That means choosing proven, straightforward primary components like engines and transmissions because on a drift car or road course car you've got 15,000 fucking things to worry about after the engine, so the engine and trans needs to be delivery-van boringly reliable while living on a rev limiter for most of its life.
Doing this honestly means a Chevy LS or a Toyota JZ. Swap kits are available for both in a MK3 and it simplifies your life quite a bit.

That said, if you want to chase down exotics on a road course with a MK3, you should start with a hardtop chassis - not the targa chassis you have, yes, the removable one-piece T-top thing your car has now. It is substantially less rigid and most targa cars weigh 80-100lbs more than a similarly equipped hardtop. I say this having owned or parted out over 20 MK3's in the past two decades.

I'd go into the details but frankly setting up a MK3 to be reliable and well sorted for road racing takes around $5-7k in suspension and brakes, more if you're including a seat, steering wheel, roll cage, etc.
Big brake upgrades will be mandatory too. The cheap Mercedes ~2001ish S500 4pot calipers that are 'bolt on' will not cut it, and the stock brakes will be straight up dangerous after one or two fast laps regardless of pad, fluid, and line selection.

It sounds to me like you want to Joe Dirt the fuck out of this build, and if you successfully navigate swapping in that Hemi, getting a clutch and flywheel combo sorted out that works with the R154, drop a carb on it and get that tuned OK, run some exhaust dumps out of the back and plumb it up to a radiator and find some big ass electric fans and just fuckin' send it - well, right on.

But be prepared for dealing with fast tire destruction, weak brakes, and you will struggle with the car instead of struggling against the track and your driving. All of which is decidedly not going to get you the 'pass me' wave from exotics with open track day and lapping groups.
Frankly, I think you've got too nice of a MK3 to fuck up like that. It looks like someone really cared about that car and MK3's are going up in value if it's a clean example.
Does it currently run? If so I'd clean it up and fix whatever it needs and sell it.


If you want wheel-to-wheel racing I would find out what's in your area and build a car around what's competitive in those local groups and classes, and focus on learning to drive well and stay in consumable parts like tires and brake pads without eating ramen 24/7.

If you're hell bent on a Hemi swapped road racer, I'd take that money from the MK3 and go with a more sorted chassis that has a LOT more support for those things like a BMW E36 or E46 coupe. You can find those with various BMW problems for pennies on the dollar - find a coupe that's got a manual trans in it and preferably no sunroof and put that on the 'because racecar' diet for that carb'd Hemi swap and you'll have a shitload of very serious advantages over starting with a MK3 for this.


But if you're gonna Joe Dirt this thing no matter what we say - all I have to add is avoid staggered wheel and tire setups. A 17x9 on all four corners with a sticky 255 will do wonders to balance the handling and you'll be able to rotate tires too.
I'd get the Megan 'track' coilovers for the MK3 because you'll need the high springrates to avoid body roll, and I'd strongly recommend swaybars but go with the softest setting on the rear swaybar that you can, if not eliminate it entirely. You will have more traction on corner exit because you won't be loading up the outside tire excessively just to avoid body roll and that'll let the IRS actually work for you instead of against you. If you need more body roll resistance in the back, go with stiffer springs or stiffer damping settings with the suspension itself instead of using swaybars.

Good luck
 

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might as well have a carb, its a hemi right. makes it simpler to run a big cam too i bet

Absolutely the fuck not.

Modern EMS's and variable cam timing make running a big cam much, much easier.
In many cases, the VVT benefits mean that you can make the same peak HP but with a broader powerband and with less overlap than on an non-VVT engine, and by going carb of course he's locking out VVT in this engine as well. For the singular purpose of making peak HP on a race track, this isn't awful.
But it's a loss of midrange power and throttle response for sure, and it'll suck ass on the street compared to a stock example still running its factory PCM.

Since the current Hemis and Gen 4+ LS's are pushrod cam-in-block engines, the intake and exhaust overlap is a one-value game no matter what (unlike DOHC engines) so you can pick up a lot of top end with a bigger cam and supporting mods.
But without the factory PCM to control idle or enjoy the benefits of variable cam timing, you're going to deal with typical carb drama which means it'll run like shit everywhere but WOT and even on WOT it'll have good days and bad days.

The only benefit to carbs is the simplicity and most people over-carb their engines same as they over-cam them for the HP they're really making because they like the lopey idle.
Working in the industry, I've seen a lot of carb'd V8 classic cars make a shitload more power AND get better gas mileage and drive better overall by going 100-150 CFM+ Smaller than the carb that was on it to start.

If he insists on going carb, I'd tell him to start with a 650 or 700cfm at the most.
 

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Going off of Wreckless's post

the one thing i have not seen is budget. Unlimited does not exist. :)

You have to have a realistic budget to do any of these projects and to get them DONE. Otherwise they sit as a perpetual projects that just sits.

Judging by this project and using Wreckless's list of things.

Expects costs to soar to about $30,000 on the inexpensive end. Yes that is buying used. Yes that is also not counting for your own time (i actually charge myself $45/hour so i can keep track and not get complacent).
 

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man I didn't realize the g3 hemi had some vvti action. yeah that would suck to loose all those neat driveability things (fuel injection, variable valve timing)

and thats a lot for a track suspension / brake setup. no doubt you will need it to slow that beast down etc.

would be so much simpler to build a drag car. slap a power glide in that bitch and a nos kit and send that joe dirt supra.

248236
 

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This car looks too nice to hack up for a swap so you can go roadrace. Find a beater pre-89 hardtop, n/a , auto, as those cars are fairly available from what I've seen. Emphasis on plentiful beater.
 

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Part of why I'm hesitant to do the widebody conversion on my car (I've had the panels to do so for nearly a decade now), is that if I'm gonna do it, it's gonna look nice. Probably not concours level show car nice, but it'll be the best looking old car on grid.

...and then I'm gonna go out and track it. Track cars earn their scars. There is attrition, damage, offs, any number of potential ways to throw that "looks fantastic" right out the window. I'm having a real hard time justifying putting that work (and budget!) into the car just to gain another 20-30mm of tire width and a bit more aggressive styling. It'll likely happen eventually, but man, it's gonna be a hard pill to swallow.

For what it's worth, I'd build an Exocet with the same Hemi engine. Half or less the weight of a Supra, and will likely outrun ANYTHING on a track if it is sorted. That said, a car with a 3 or 4 to one weight to power ratio isn't for everybody. I'd probably poo myself before the end of a lap.

Oh, and a completed Exocet is likely to cost a third of what you're likely to put into the Mk3, and be far easier on consumables due to being sub-2000 lbs.
 

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Love the "Joe Dirt" comment, and friggie is spot on about costs.
I too have seen many V8 swaps, and most of them were disappointing in performance after finished, and swapped back to 3 liter turbo after a season.
Or they just ran into way too many issues that were never sorted out.
I have zero respect for V8s, as only a hand full even managed to pull my NA 7M, and most of those were supercharged, or were built stop-light cars.

And only have skipped over this thread due to issues with this forum displaying correctly on my desk top, I didn't notice addressing the rear subframe, which will surely fail.
A lot of torque, and a weak subframe, I see free floating diff in your future.
Also didn't see anything about suspension upgrades.....
I'm guessing it will cost a lot more than $30k to make this a viable track car.

Just a suggestion, build the chassis first, before swapping in a big, heavy torque engine, that you will get thrown into some very high end class, where you will have no chance in.
 

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The only thing worse than a non-ideal build is one that never finishes.

I'd use a trans that already bolts up to the engine. Adapting an R154 would be a pain you can avoid. The R154 is a truck transmission. You can do way better for a track car.

I agree with others to get your gameplan together up front. Different is cool when it all works and has a purpose. Sounds like you've got the means to do some good stuff, but we've all seen people get in over their heads and abandon the project. That sucks for everyone - most importantly your audience that wants to see a beast of a mk3! ;)
 
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