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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In the market for a oil catch can setup to help with crankcase ventilation. Does anyone have a preference with aftermarket setups? The two I have been eye-balling are

- Radium Engineering Dual Catch Can Kit MkIV Supra 93-98 Vent To Atmosphere (comes with -10AN press in valve cover fittings, no taping)

OR

- Freed Engineering Supra catch can (requires taping your valve covers for fittings or purchasing the press in -10AN fittings, additional $120)

With the price of both these with my options desired, the setup will be about same price. Curious if anyone has used the Radium setup yet, I know freed engineering is used by other members.


Thanks,
Adam
 

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I recommend the PHR kit. It uses -12 lines. You can send your covers to them to weld the fittings in place. You'll need to then remove the baffles when you get them back and clean out the debris and reinstall the baffles.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I recommend the PHR kit. It uses -12 lines. You can send your covers to them to weld the fittings in place. You'll need to then remove the baffles when you get them back and clean out the debris and reinstall the baffles.

Steve
Thanks Steve. I definitely had my eye on the PHR setup but I was hoping to avoid welding my new oem valve covers. I am shooting for the -10AN press in fittings. All of PHR products are great quality I'm sure the catch can is no exception. .
 

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I have a Whifbitz stage 3 breather tank setup for sale, Pic in the for sale section if it is something you might be interested in.
 

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I'm also curious how the press-in fittings work as well. Would they be just as restrictive since you're not tapping the actual cover? They do look nice though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have a Whifbitz stage 3 breather tank setup for sale, Pic in the for sale section if it is something you might be interested in.
Does the air filter come in contact with the hood? Im not sure I like the filter location but that does look like a nice setup. I will keep that in mind. Thanks!
 

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Does the air filter come in contact with the hood? Im not sure I like the filter location but that does look like a nice setup. I will keep that in mind. Thanks!
I would think that it does not come in contact with the hood. I can check this for you if you are genuinely interested in purchasing mate.
 

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In the market for a oil catch can setup to help with crankcase ventilation. Does anyone have a preference with aftermarket setups? The two I have been eye-balling are

- Radium Engineering Dual Catch Can Kit MkIV Supra 93-98 Vent To Atmosphere (comes with -10AN press in valve cover fittings, no taping)

OR

- Freed Engineering Supra catch can (requires taping your valve covers for fittings or purchasing the press in -10AN fittings, additional $120)

With the price of both these with my options desired, the setup will be about same price. Curious if anyone has used the Radium setup yet, I know freed engineering is used by other members.


Thanks,
Adam


That's what I would get. Catch cans are almost NEVER set up properly in peoples' street cars. They usually install them just to check off a box on their build. If you want to do it right with some other catch can then you should not let it vent to atmosphere, it needs to have vacuum drawn on it from the intake. Simply letting the blow by get to some lazy air outlet covered by a breather filter is definitely not going to help with crank case ventilation issues anywhere close to as effectively as a properly set up sealed catch can.

People, very likely, will take issue with what I've said.... and that's fine. Let them be "right". If you want a setup that works properly and efficiently at doing it's job then you don't vent it to the atmosphere. The AOS I posted above is superior to a normal catch can because it boils off the junk that would contaminate your oil and lets the oil go back to your pan.

Edit: also I wouldn't bother with the press in fittings. They are going to create a bottle neck that wasn't there before by having a small opening, even if it connects to a -10AN line. This is like having a 1.5" pipe on your turbine outlet going to a 4" after the catalytic converter. That's just an example to show a flow restriction that more people will easily understand. I would get a spare set of valve covers and have them modified properly with weld in fittings so you can get the full flow of large ports. Small ports will create velocity that will likely drag extra oil along with it meaning your can might fill up faster than if you had large ports and low velocity but high flow.
 

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In the market for a oil catch can setup to help with crankcase ventilation. Does anyone have a preference with aftermarket setups? The two I have been eye-balling are

- Radium Engineering Dual Catch Can Kit MkIV Supra 93-98 Vent To Atmosphere (comes with -10AN press in valve cover fittings, no taping)

OR

- Freed Engineering Supra catch can (requires taping your valve covers for fittings or purchasing the press in -10AN fittings, additional $120)

With the price of both these with my options desired, the setup will be about same price. Curious if anyone has used the Radium setup yet, I know freed engineering is used by other members.


Thanks,
Adam
Adam,

I am running a Radium dual catch can setup on my Mkiv. I have it configured to their vent to engine setup (recirculated) to help with positive crank case evacuation, and I'm running their press-in fitting for the valve covers. The fittings are a tight fit as intended, and swivels well after installation. I'd probably use a softer material other than a socket to press these in to avoid marring them up. The stock 2jz-gte valve covers are a pretty dirty casting, so it is nice to be able to avoid welding on them.

I did have to install a high temp adel clamp on the exhaust side of the hose to prevent it from sagging on top of the turbo's down pipe.

It has some built-in dip sticks so you can periodically check on the oil level without removing the can. Those dip sticks are o-ring'd and it's a bit of a tight fit, so I put vaseline on the o-rings and it helps. Fitment on everything else is perfect. You can also get their optional drain petcock that makes draining very easy.

Overall I'm very happy with their catch cans. I have a built motor currently making a modest 660 whp. Currently, I have approximately 4-5000 combined miles of cruising, spirited driving, and about 4 hours of dyno time, and I've not had to drain the catch can once. Oil is barely registering in the dip stick. The Intake tract is very clean as well. Your results may vary depending on the health of your motor.


Hope this helps with your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Adam,

I am running a Radium dual catch can setup on my Mkiv. I have it configured to their vent to engine setup (recirculated) to help with positive crank case evacuation, and I'm running their press-in fitting for the valve covers. The fittings are a tight fit as intended, and swivels well after installation. I'd probably use a softer material other than a socket to press these in to avoid marring them up. The stock 2jz-gte valve covers are a pretty dirty casting, so it is nice to be able to avoid welding on them.

I did have to install a high temp adel clamp on the exhaust side of the hose to prevent it from sagging on top of the turbo's down pipe.

It has some built-in dip sticks so you can periodically check on the oil level without removing the can. Those dip sticks are o-ring'd and it's a bit of a tight fit, so I put vaseline on the o-rings and it helps. Fitment on everything else is perfect. You can also get their optional drain petcock that makes draining very easy.

Overall I'm very happy with their catch cans. I have a built motor currently making a modest 660 whp. Currently, I have approximately 4-5000 combined miles of cruising, spirited driving, and about 4 hours of dyno time, and I've not had to drain the catch can once. Oil is barely registering in the dip stick. The Intake tract is very clean as well. Your results may vary depending on the health of your motor.


Hope this helps with your decision.
This is just the review I was looking for. I was looking at the wrong kit it seems. Did you have to purchase the press on valve cover fitting separately for the VTE kit? This is very helpful, thanks Sam!
 

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Discussion Starter #12

That's what I would get. Catch cans are almost NEVER set up properly in peoples' street cars. They usually install them just to check off a box on their build. If you want to do it right with some other catch can then you should not let it vent to atmosphere, it needs to have vacuum drawn on it from the intake. Simply letting the blow by get to some lazy air outlet covered by a breather filter is definitely not going to help with crank case ventilation issues anywhere close to as effectively as a properly set up sealed catch can.

People, very likely, will take issue with what I've said.... and that's fine. Let them be "right". If you want a setup that works properly and efficiently at doing it's job then you don't vent it to the atmosphere. The AOS I posted above is superior to a normal catch can because it boils off the junk that would contaminate your oil and lets the oil go back to your pan.

Edit: also I wouldn't bother with the press in fittings. They are going to create a bottle neck that wasn't there before by having a small opening, even if it connects to a -10AN line. This is like having a 1.5" pipe on your turbine outlet going to a 4" after the catalytic converter. That's just an example to show a flow restriction that more people will easily understand. I would get a spare set of valve covers and have them modified properly with weld in fittings so you can get the full flow of large ports. Small ports will create velocity that will likely drag extra oil along with it meaning your can might fill up faster than if you had large ports and low velocity but high flow.
Thanks for this in depth analysis on the proper method for ventilation. I appreciate the help! Your analysis makes sense
 

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This is just the review I was looking for. I was looking at the wrong kit it seems. Did you have to purchase the press on valve cover fitting separately for the VTE kit? This is very helpful, thanks Sam!
Adam,

My 2018 invoice did not show that I had to purchase the fittings seperately. I just glanced over their website, and you can see their press-in fittings are included in their illustration of their kits as well. Glad it helped

 

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Thanks Steve. I definitely had my eye on the PHR setup but I was hoping to avoid welding my new oem valve covers. I am shooting for the -10AN press in fittings. All of PHR products are great quality I'm sure the catch can is no exception. .
If you are going to do it, then do it right. Welding a brand new set of valve covers isn't going to harm them. If you use the press in fittings you are creating a huge bottle neck. I had PHR weld my covers, blasted them, and had them powder coated. Then I took them apart after powder and cleaned the insides to ensure no debris got into my new engine. Put the baffles back together and you're set.

STeve
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Do you still need to drill out the holes to appropriate 12AN size prior to welding the fittings? or simply weld on and be done?

edit: Spoke with Sam at PHR, he recommends drilling out the current valve cover fitting hole to match 12AN diameter for best flow.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you are going to do it, then do it right. Welding a brand new set of valve covers isn't going to harm them. If you use the press in fittings you are creating a huge bottle neck. I had PHR weld my covers, blasted them, and had them powder coated. Then I took them apart after powder and cleaned the insides to ensure no debris got into my new engine. Put the baffles back together and you're set.

STeve
Steve

did you tap the baffle holes for screws upon reassembly?? Did you also re-silicone them? I found a good welder right by me that’s gonna help then I need to reassemble.
 

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I have the radium catch cans. Very happy with them.
 

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Steve

did you tap the baffle holes for screws upon reassembly?? Did you also re-silicone them? I found a good welder right by me that’s gonna help then I need to reassemble.
So I used high temp silicone in each hole and pop aluminum pop rivets to hold the baffles in place when I reassembled them. They've held together for 5 years so far and if you think about it, there is no reason for them to not hold up forever. I didn't use screws for fear of them backing out and ending up in the camshaft area.

Steve
 

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If you want to do it right with some other catch can then you should not let it vent to atmosphere, it needs to have vacuum drawn on it from the intake.
You want to explain how that is supposed to work in a forced induction application?
 
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