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Your Neighborhood Pikey
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there... I have been asked by a few others how to shim your valves for a camshaft install, so I thought I would post a few pictures of the goods and a simple write-up on how to make it happen.

First, you need to gain access to the shims and buckets. This will require removal of the cams and I won't go into that. You can reference the 2JZ manual for this. Once you have access to your shims and buckets, I have a tackle box that allows me to place the assemblies in the exact order I pulled them. The bucket has two notches that allow you to pop the shims out. Here is what they look like:








Now I measure each shim with a dial caliper to obtain the thickness:



I use a piece of paper and write one side Intake and one side Exhaust and then 1A and 1B for the #1 valves, 2A and 2B, etc etc. Basically I record the shim thicknesses I measure:




I do this so I can compare my shims and it also helps because I might be able to mix them around to get the shims in the correct place.


Now... The easy part... Measuring your lash. To properly measure out the lash, the lobe needs to point straight up. Once you take the readings, record them on the same piece of paper. The intake side you want is to be .15mm. Therefore for simplicity-sake, if your lash is .25mm and your shim is 2.80mm, then you would want to replace it with a 2.90mm shim, increasing your shim height .10mm.


If you are simply verifying your lash and not replacing the cams, I would suggest that you check your lash readings prior to removing your cams as you might not have to change shims if they are within the specified range. If you are installing new cams then the process I described would apply.



Intake Valve Clearance Cold:

0.15 - 0.25mm (0.006 - 0.010")

Exhaust Valve Clearance Cold:

0.25 - 0.35mm (0.010 - 0.014")




I hope this helps. Please offer up any suggestions or tips you guys might have. I'm just trying to help others out who might not have done this before.


Take care!

Chris
 

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JZA70 448 rwhp everyday
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sticky please!

~scott
 

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Not so boring anymore
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hey i got that same caliper.. :) good info..
 

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Over 10 years on SF....
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If I could plus one you, I would. Thanks.
 

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Your Neighborhood Pikey
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3,341 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
toyotech01 said:
Awesome writeup, I've done this with the camshaft(s) still installed, this is waaaaaay easier.
Jake
It is definitely easier if you dont have to pull the cams. I thought about this since I was installing new Crower 2JZ cams and wanted to put some pictures up. A lot of people have asked about it and it is actually easy to do as long as you have a good methodical approach to recording your readings.

- Chris
 

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JZA is best f**k the rest
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351 Posts
HamsMKIII said:
It is definitely easier if you dont have to pull the cams. I thought about this since I was installing new Crower 2JZ cams and wanted to put some pictures up. A lot of people have asked about it and it is actually easy to do as long as you have a good methodical approach to recording your readings.

- Chris
No, I wrote this wrong, I would rather pull the cams and use the way you have written, good writeup.
Jake
 

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Hey Hams, are the 1j and 2j shims interchangeable? and also how much and where did you get them? My local Toyota dealer told me they were $6+ each and i thought i recalled (you?) saying you got them for about 2.50 each. And a little OT but are the valve stem seals the same also between 1j and 2j?
 

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Your Neighborhood Pikey
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Valve stem seals and lash pads are interchangeable between the 1JZ and the 2JZ heads.

- Chris
 

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Your Neighborhood Pikey
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yup sure is. I've found that shims are interchangeable from a 99 Yamaha R1 so we have adjustment range of 1.5mm all the way up to 3.30mm.

oh... And it IS easy to do... Just document where everything is pulled from!

- Chris
 

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Moderator, l337 M0d3r4t0r
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mister i need u to call me, i need to borrow them shims you have.
 

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Your Neighborhood Pikey
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3,341 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
ZaZZn said:
mister i need u to call me, i need to borrow them shims you have.

Yes sir, will give you a buzz this morning. I have to run into the office to take care of a few fires and then I'll be out for the rest of the week. I'll call you in a few hours.

Chris
 

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Yup sure is. I've found that shims are interchangeable from a 99 Yamaha R1 so we have adjustment range of 1.5mm all the way up to 3.30mm.

oh... And it IS easy to do... Just document where everything is pulled from!

- Chris
Wow that helps a LOT! Thanks for taking time to do this write. And +1 for the sticky.
 

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the intoxicating drink
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very nice and simple. i love it. i will be getting into this in the next few weeks. i appreciate the write-up, just as many others have stated. very nice. +1 here.

brett
 

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can you explain for everyone else that doesn't know:

a) why you are shimming the new cams?
b) what is this shim setup all about?
c) if shims are needed, do you also need springs and retainers?
 

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Your Neighborhood Pikey
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
can you explain for everyone else that doesn't know:

a) why you are shimming the new cams?
b) what is this shim setup all about?
c) if shims are needed, do you also need springs and retainers?

The Yamaha head uses shims of various thickness to adjust the valve lash for each individual valve. When changing cams, variances in clearances make it necessary to measure out the valve lash and adjust accordingly. If you build a head and install new valves, it is quite likely that your valve lash will need to be adjusted.

Typically higher mileage heads might require that valves need to be re-lashed.

The need for springs/retainers is defined on the amount of lift before coil bind created by the lift of the camshaft. Stock springs/retainers work with stock cams as well as mild cams like 256's or 264's. More aggressive cams with more lift require a stiffer spring to avoid coil bind at higher lift and also to avoid valve float at higher rpm operation. Lighter retainers, keepers and seats reduce rotating mass and help in higher rpm operation.

Hope that helps.

- Hams
 
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