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Byron said:
ok... is that one of the good brands...? some one told me is one of the best ..but I don't know...

Yeah, its one of the competitive good ones. Its the paint I used the last time I painted my car (my pics in the spray booth).
Just make sure you get their high-end lines of clear ("Global" and I forget the other one). You'll see once you start asking for it from the dealers.
 

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Unchained
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Byron,
You say the red looks different shades when viewed inside. Is this under flourescent lights? Flourescents can play funny tricks on colors. Something may look great under incandescent lights and sunlight then look all goofed under flourescents. Also, I've seen different materials painted with the exact same paint and exact same processes and still look slightly different. The metal panels may look different from the plastic bumpers, handles and wing due to the underlaying material.

Has your car ever had any body work, either from you or the previous owner? The Toyota red, like my black, is not clearcoated. If the car had any body work and had clear applied to that area then it will definitely look different from the non-clearcoated sections, mostly under flourescent light.

I backed into a wheel barrel (stupid story) and had to have some lite body work done to the right rear quarter. The previous owner had to have some work done to the left rear quarter due to a hit and run in a parking lot. The left quarter had a very visible blend at the top of the C-pillar which always bothered me. Along with having the scratch repaired on the right side I also had the shop clear the entire rear of the car to eliminate that blend on the left side. Outside sunlight, and in most other lights, you can not notice a difference between the original, non clearcoated paint and the clear coated paint. Only under flourescent light under certain angles can you see a difference. The clearcoated appears more shiney, the non-clearcoated looks like it has a milky film on the surface.

The repair, with paint to the the small repaired area, along with the clear to both quarters and roof cost me $900. An entire car repaint will be significantly more due to R & R of many more parts. I had the MKII repainted at the same shop, when in Cincinnati, as the MKIV. I basically had the same thing done to the MKII as what you want to do to your MKIV. I needed to have some rust/body work repaired and then an entire repaint with original color. I did all the R & R of exterior trim and some interior in order to save lots of $$$$. Most shops can paint and sand/buff pretty quick, it's all the before and after work that takes time and your money. The MKII was @ $5000, lots of time spent on the body work repair. Since you don't need any repair your cost should be less. You should also take it upon yourself to remove as much of the exterior trim as possible in order to save yourself some coin. Bumpers, headlights, side markers, taillights, wing, window trim, mirrors, door handles, anything that will make it easier on the shop to simply roll it in, tape off a few things and spray will save you LOTS of money....though it looks odd driving down the road (keep the taillights in until you reach the shop).

A good tip when looking for a quality shop, do lots of hunting and talking. Talk to guys with sweeeet hot rod restorations. Talk to guys who have those wild, and sometimes down right wacky, dumb looking custom paint jobs. They're two very different groups of people but both of them spend big bucks on painting their cars and will settle for nothing than the best quality shops in town. Also ask about the specific individual at those shops who painted the car. One shop may have a top notch, experienced painter working along side a newer guy off the streets. I think you know which of the two you want to choose to paint your MKIV. The shop I used in Cincy had a couple guys who painted smaller pieces (bumpers, mirrors, sunroof panels, etc.) but only one guy who did the overall large items (entire cars, body panels, doors). This guy did some down right crazy custom stuff so a simple, one color repaint was easy for him and turned out looking great.

One other thing to be cautious about mostly on the body kit pieces. Be certain the shop is experienced in fiberglass materials. If not handled properly you could receive low quality work. If the fiberglass part has any sort of small air pocket trapped between the fiberglass layers, the baking after painting will cause the air to expand and eventually crack the paint. Sometimes this cracking may not occur immediately, but maybe 3-6 months down the road. After that time you may no longer have a warranty claim with the shop. Lower baking temperatures may be neccessary to avoid this.

PPG and Dupont are two of the most widely used and respected paint brands in the business. Lean towards PPG.

Congratulations if you've read this far....you win nothing.
Scott
 

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Wheel Whore
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The German red paint used to paint used to paint porsches, bmw's is called "guardsman red". Its a very bright red paint job and you could call local porsche dealers for the codes. I know it would look so good on a mkiv.
 
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