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Discussion Starter #1
I recently found an N/A with a TRD wb and noticed that nothing was done with the original rear fenders(which is now the inside fender). I couldn't find any pics to show whether the fenders are rolled, cut or a combination. How is it done the right way?
 

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The right way is NOT to cut the rear quarter panels because cutting them will alter the structural integrity of the car. My body shop was able to install the widebody panels so that there is no possible way you can tell that the stock panels are underneath...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
what's the point of having a widebody if they stock rear fenders aren't cut?
:dunno: maybe if you run no suspension?

The right way is NOT to cut the rear quarter panels because cutting them will alter the structural integrity of the car. My body shop was able to install the widebody panels so that there is no possible way you can tell that the stock panels are underneath...
:lame:
there is nothing structural that the quarter panels do besides exterior looks
 

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I will agree with THILC

I am Structural/Mechanical engineer and he is absolutley right. Why rear quaters dont provide alot durabilty to the car it does add enough that the car does need them to keep enough rigidness to the body. With out them alot of the other panels in the car would begin to crease oh so slighlty but enough for any supra to get mad or upset by.
 

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During the installation of my widebody, I also noticed that the stock panels also help a lot in the aligning of the widebody panels. So cutting them off will no doubt lead to other problems...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If I were talking to a Toyota engineer of course I would throw up the BS flag. It doesn't add up, therefore I need proof.

personally I don't think that taking a few spot welds and maybe glue(not sure how Supra has there well lips setup) around the wheel well will damage any sort of durability other than a impact, in which the overfender will take in the first place. I will have a caged chassis anyway so I am not to worried about chassis flex.

HOWEVER no one has actually answered my question.
 

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If I were talking to a Toyota engineer of course I would throw up the BS flag. It doesn't add up, therefore I need proof.

personally I don't think that taking a few spot welds and maybe glue(not sure how Supra has there well lips setup) around the wheel well will damage any sort of durability other than a impact, in which the overfender will take in the first place. I will have a caged chassis anyway so I am not to worried about chassis flex.

HOWEVER no one has actually answered my question.

Do you even know what you're asking? May be you should go ahead and cut the quarter panels off then come back here and give us the proof :)
 

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Do you even know what you're asking? May be you should go ahead and cut the quarter panels off then come back here and give us the proof :)
Good idea.

I actually asked a professional body shop guy about this when I was rolling my fenders, and he said just rolling them slightly ruins the structural integrity a bit, and if you cut them even worse. Would it be noticeable? Not sure, the Supra chassis is pretty solid, but none the less it would have a negative impact.

Cut them off and let us know.
 

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An FEA would be great to prove this case. The rear quarters experience stresses but probably to the point that a fiberglass part replacement could counter act, given that the fibers are arranged properly.

Does the installation manual recommend cutting the fenders? If the so, I think the Toyota engineers did their homeworks or else they wouldn't sell it for their product.

I thought one advantages of installing this kit was to save weight; is this correct?

Just my thoughts, pls. don't flame.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
no now your making stuff up...I never said cutting off the whole panel. however I would most definitely try it if I had one to try. I am taking a wild guess and saying that no one that has posted has any real experience with this. I do know the question that I am asking.....let me explain for those who don't understand.

The panel that goes over the stock quarter extends out further than the stock quarter. Now as stated what point is a wider fender if the wheel base is not widened. So to do so you may add spacers(gay) or you choose the path of a wider wheel(if you dont use a totally different rear end setup). Now if the car were to go full rear squat, the wider wheel base WILL HIT THE STOCK QUATER. So to prevent this from happening it must be moved.
QUESTION:How is this stock quarter moved out of the way properly?

now to explain the cutting of the fender in my mind. Keep in mind this is kind of rough since I have no measurement.

now the green line represents the cut line on the stock quarter...the X's indicate the cut piece which will not be there anymore. Now anyone going to tell me that I have crippled the integrity of the body. Now I would plan on taking that cut at the top to the wheel well and joining together. Then all I would have to seal is the gap between the quater and the overfender lip.
 

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My TRD kit came with installation manuals which show that the stock quarter panels do not have to be cut. The body shop trimmed the lips off the stock fenders and custom made a bracket to join the factory panels with the widebody ones. This bracket is where you get the extra room for the wider wheels. The TRD panels widen the rear mostly on the top half. Toward the bottom, they curve inward and almost converge onto the stock fenders. The special bracket was made to join the gap(about 1.5 inch) between the stock and the TRD panels. If done right, the fender wells should look like they came from the factory.

Because you only gain just over an inch on the outside, the offsets of the wider wheels must be calculated to utilize all the interior space between the wheels and the suspension. That is the reason why most widebodies are limited on the lip size of their wheels.



I wish TRD had made a widebody kit which allow room for wheels similar to these on a Pantera...

 

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Discussion Starter #19
THILC you wouldn't happen to have any pics of that lip and braket would you. Read through your thread and couldn't find any pics that I could see it very well.

Try a real widebody JGTC style for something like them on the pantera
 
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