Supra Forums banner
21 - 25 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I tried electric fans in Kuwait. I ordered a Flex-A-Lite and had it on for maybe 2 days then it came right off and back to a clutch fan. Brought the Flex-A Lite to the USA and ran it on my 72 K5 Blazer in Phoenix AZ for a couple of weeks and decided to go back to a clutch fan because both ran to warm with the Supra really struggling in the summer here. Now the Flex-A-Lite sits on a shelf in my Garage.

I recently had to remove my Koyo aluminum because the intercooler pipe feeding my 1JZ was pushing the shroud enough to cause a pinhole leak on one of the cores so I put the Koyo standard rad on for the moment.

An undercover is good to have and also a swirl pot for the rad to help keep the air out of the cooling system.
It’s really frustrating because the clutch fan combo did a great job keeping things cool. If only it didn’t shred my radiator then I wouldn’t even consider changing it out. I’m hopeful this combo does the trick otherwise I guess I’m gonna have to shell out the money and try again. Nothings gonna stop me from driving my baby again though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
Patrick, if you do decide to run an electric fan, I'd highly recommend you run an OEM fan setup and figure out how to make it fit your setup. OE setups are engineered and torture tested in rather extreme environments, whereas your typical aftermarket option just has to move some air. Flyin Miata has done a great deal of work to ensure that their fan setups actually WORK in the environments they're used in, and the R&D results back up their efforts. I'd actually considered running one of their top shelf radiator / fan setups on my Supra. They work well on their V8 powered track monsters, they would work for my setup. But... definitely not a direct fit, and not exactly cheap either.

For my setup, I run a Ford Contour SVT fan / shroud combo that's trimmed to fit my specific setup. It's uh... it's tight, to put it politely, but it works. More importantly, you need to make sure you're feeding that radiator fresh air. Are there gaps around your radiator? Get rid of them, seal them up, do whatever it takes, get creative. Is there a tray running under the car between the nose of the car and just behind the radiator? If not... the air is just going into the nose and right under the car, completely bypassing your radiator and doing you no good at all. Give the air going into the nose of the car only ONE path to go, and make it work for you. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Patrick, if you do decide to run an electric fan, I'd highly recommend you run an OEM fan setup and figure out how to make it fit your setup. OE setups are engineered and torture tested in rather extreme environments, whereas your typical aftermarket option just has to move some air. Flyin Miata has done a great deal of work to ensure that their fan setups actually WORK in the environments they're used in, and the R&D results back up their efforts. I'd actually considered running one of their top shelf radiator / fan setups on my Supra. They work well on their V8 powered track monsters, they would work for my setup. But... definitely not a direct fit, and not exactly cheap either.

For my setup, I run a Ford Contour SVT fan / shroud combo that's trimmed to fit my specific setup. It's uh... it's tight, to put it politely, but it works. More importantly, you need to make sure you're feeding that radiator fresh air. Are there gaps around your radiator? Get rid of them, seal them up, do whatever it takes, get creative. Is there a tray running under the car between the nose of the car and just behind the radiator? If not... the air is just going into the nose and right under the car, completely bypassing your radiator and doing you no good at all. Give the air going into the nose of the car only ONE path to go, and make it work for you. ;)
Thanks again for the advice, I’m going to make a run to the local wrecker this week and try to find a setup that will fit in my engine bay. I plan to fabricate a skid plate to cover the bottom of the engine bay to keep air in and I’ll try to fill the gaps you mentioned. It’s gonna work one way or the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
That's the spirit! Brackets are pretty easy to fabricate to hold the fans in place. I mean... I made them for my setup. Me, this dink who barely knows which end of a wrench goes on the screwdriver. I figured out how to make the brackets that hold my setup together. :p

Really doesn't even need to be anything terribly heavy duty either. Mine's held in place with strips of 18ga aluminum that I trimmed, rounded, drilled, and bent into shape. Nothing fancy, just off cuts of my fan shroud that I made. Oh, and you'll wanna use CAD to make your fabricated bits. Cardboard Aided Design. Get some cardboard, cut it and shape it into shapes you think will work for your application. Then, once it fits, recreate your template with whatever metal you're using. Cardboard's cheap, generally flexible, and better yet, recyclable around the garage or to the recycling center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Update for all that viewed or helped me with this problem: I decided to bite the bullet and spend the money and bought the new fan clutch and the 2JZGTE fan blade. I also bought a shroud and installed everything today along with my inline coolant temp sensor. Btw I am using an oem radiator that came with the car. Had it pressure tested and cleaned, etc.
Final result: no fan blade contact on the shroud, no coolant leaks, and most important of all the temp never went over 180. I consider this a success and thank the forum members for their contributions.
I still plan to make some kind of skid plate to keep the air flow inside the engine bay but for now I’m just happy to be on the road again.
Cheers!
 
21 - 25 of 25 Posts
Top