Supra Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone. So my alpine silver supra's exterior is in phenomenal condition with the exception of the front bumper. Granted, the bumper still looks great but the perfectionist in me is bugged by a couple flaws. You will see in the picture below the spots that bug me. My plan is to get rid of the license plate screw holes (middle circle) , fix a chip (left circle), and fix some stress cracks (right circle). I've gone to a professional body shop in Northwest Indiana and got a quote of around $800-900. They do plastic welding and can make the screw holes disappear and will also sand and re-paint the whole bumper to fix the chip and stress cracks. My biggest concern of course is proper color matching. I was told that silver is a pretty difficult color to perfectly match and the fact that the car is a 1994 makes things tricky as well. I'm worried that if the color doesn't match perfectly I'll just be trading in one imperfection for another. I know these shops are usually pretty darn good but do I have a legitimate concert? Have any of you had similar re-painting work done? Are there other options I should consider? Thanks in advance for any help.
-Jason
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
In order for them to have it match properly you need them to blend the hood and fenders also. It's really the only way to make sure that the paint looks right.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,805 Posts
In my experience the factory paint on the supra plastics (front bumper, rear bumper, brake ducts) never matched the body color 100% from the factory (especially on the silvers/greens/rsp's) as all those pieces were painted separate from the car and onto different surfaces. They are going to have to spend some time painting test pieces and tinting the clear to match as close as possible. But again I would not feel bad as the only cars I've seen with 100% matching paint were fully repainted by a shop to begin with.

Alot of paint shops will just mix the color code, do a quick test strip, and shoot it as long as its close. Really need to have them do test pieces, cure, clear coat tint, and formulate the best combo for your car. Because keep in mind the rest of the paint is OLD and does have some color degradation over time...so you are matching old paint no matter what.

Source - have painted parts on my Alpine silver car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
I've owned 2 alpine silver's in the past and from my experience... had no issues paint matching.

In your case, I'm guessing they will apply primer to only the repair marks, and not the whole bumper. So when all the clear is sanded down, and base coat is shot over the existing one... everything should match up when it's finished. As long as the paint mix Is spot on.


I've had bumpers also fully redone in alpine silver... primer / sealer / base / clear... and those looked just fine. I don't think silver is that bad. I find the gray's to be more difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
FastTurbo - The shop said that they would do multiple test pieces to find the best match. They'll sand the whole bumper and do all the proper layers. They do all the body work for the local Toyota and Ford dealership that surrounds them so they seem to be real professionals who know what they're doing. I appreciate your input and I'll use your check list to make sure they're doing everything properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
msupra - I've had bumpers painted on other cars that came out perfect so I have faith in these guys, but never had any work done on anything as old as my supra. Its good to get input from another silver supra owner.
 
Joined
·
464 Posts
I work in the industry. If your original paint on the fenders is old, it may have some fading. Extra tinting and test strips will cost you a little if they charge extra to get it perfect. However, it will never match the fenders exactly. Blending the fenders is a misnomer, since the angle of reflection, other than the front hood/bumper and sides where it lines up to the fenders, may look different, merely by the angle or height at which you are looking at the bumper. Try standing upright, then kneel, and look at different angles and the color will magically look different just by the angle at which you are looking and reflection of the light on different surface planes. Also paint on a plastic bumper, may look slightly different than the same exact same color paint on a metal fender, because the underlying material is different. Remember they can tint the paint with multiple test strips, but it still may look different due to the fading of the old paint on the fenders, and angle of the different surface planes.

With all that being said. I would leave it if the paint on the bumper is the original paint, and stop nit picking. Other alternative is to paint the bumper, and don't paint the fenders since you have original paint on the fenders. Third alternative is to paint your entire car to match everything perfectly. If you are a perfectionist, this is the only way to get it absolutely perfect. Blending the fenders is a trick of the eye only in place of matching old to new paint. But new clear will be on your bumper and fenders, and not on the hood and rest of the car - it will be noticeable. Old clear is not as clear as old clear, and is shinier - noticeably. You can have them polish the fenders and rest of the car to see if that will help the shiny effect, but it depends on the age of the old paint how good it will match up. Old clear may be faded and a little foggier, and you will not tell unless up against brand new paint.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,499 Posts
Agree with FastTurbo and briankallaher. I have never seen perfect matching on a silver car and briankallaher explained the problems with blending much better than I could have. Fortunately, I never had a reason to respray my silver AMG from years ago, but I did not take a chance with my Celica Supra and resprayed the entire car. With silver in particular, it's the only way to guarantee the look you're after, IMO.

BEFORE:


DURING:


AFTER:


Best of luck.

Ken.
 

·
-Question Conjecture-
Joined
·
3,027 Posts
As has been stated, only spray your bumper cover if the rest of the paint is original (fenders/hood). I had a good friend respray my front bumper cover ONLY, and it took him around a straight hour blending and re-blending silver on sample cards trying to create a mix that matched my fenders/hood on a bright, sunny day. He did a damn fine job, too. It can be done, but your paint guy has to be good.

Here is how mine turned out:

 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top