Supra Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My car will be down for a couple of weeks so I was thinking about replaceing my rear main seal. It is leaking a little bit and the engine has 87000 miles on it. Anyone know where I can read the procedure or has anyone actually done their own and willing to give me the step by step on a supra tt? Anything else I shoud replace while I'm there?

Thanks,
SwamiBob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Does the old one just pry out and the new one just push back in or does it take any special tools?
 

·
powered by
Joined
·
998 Posts
You can carefully use a flat head screw driver to pop out the old one. I prefer to use a seal puller but a screw driver will work fine. Push the new seal in to get it started. I like to use a 1/4" socket extension to lightly tap the seal into place. Use a small hamer and tap it in until it is flush with the seal housing. Becareful-the rear main seal housing may or may not have a lip for the seal to rest on. Some toyotas do,some don't. If it doesn't have a lip, you are able to push the seal in too far. Just tap it until it is completely flush with the housing. Sometimes I'll take a sealant-like Toyota FIPG and make a light bead between the oustside edge of the seal and the housing. Don't do this around the inside seal, as the crank turns of course. Hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yes, the tranny's clutches are breaking down very quickly after changing the fluid after it hadn't been changed in so long. It completly clogged up the filter/screen so not enough fluid was getting through within 2 hrs of driving after the 3800 TC install. It made it act like the fluid was very low and it would just slip like it was in neutral in any gear position, but really it just couldn't flow through the transmission like it needs to. I was going to send it to PHR or SP, but Phoenix hard parts are sounding good to me as the guy told me for a stage III rebuilt for high hp and a 6 mo warrenty it was $2200 with exchange and they have them built and in stock, something the PHR and SP can't say. Also, their price is $3400. Have you heard anything good or bad about Phoenix hard parts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I just changed my rear main seal last week when my motor was out of the car.

What toypro described is totally accurate. There is actually small lips on the seal retainer in which you can use a flat head to pry off with the screwdriver after you remove the 10mm bolts.

I had a little trouble of doing this with the oil pan still in place. I think my oil pan had been off before and whoever put it back together the first time siliconed the seal retainer/housing to the oil pan as well.

Since I was resealing my oil pan again anyway, I just took the pans off, then popped out the rear main seal retainer, replaced the seal like toypro descirbed, and put it all back together... Very straight forward.

Good luck,
 
P

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I installed a PRT Stage III trans from Phoenix Hard Parts about 3 months ago. It is AWESOME!!! It shifts really quick and to date I haven't had any problems with it. Frank at Phoenix Hard Parts even called me a few weeks after my purchase to make sure that the transmission was to my liking. I highly recommend them to anyone. I also installed a 3400 stall converter as well. Thanks Frank
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Rear Main

Swamibob,

I think that you should take off the rear main seal housing. You have a better chance of getting the seal in straight. If you have access to a lift than maybe consider leaving it bolted to the back of the block and saving yourself the time of resealing the pan and seal housing.

Rear Main Seal replacement tips:

*Un-bolt the rear main seal housing.

*Clean and prep the mating surfaces on the block and seal housing so they are free of sealant.

*Use acetone for cleaning.

*Do not use anything between the outer surface of the seal and housing. Make sure both mating surfaces are “clean and dry” and that the seal is flush and square in the housing bore

*Keep the seal from bending or twisting. Install the seal as straight as you can.

*Press the seal in by distributing the load across it with something flat.

*Apply some oil or assembly lube around the inner rear main seal. This will allow the seal to stay cool while in contact with the spinning crank journal.

*If you’re good and have installed the seal correctly you will have no-worries of leaking oil past the crank journal. (Unless you make a hell-of allot of boost)

*Make sure that you clean free all sealant from the bottom of the u-shaped section on the rear of the pan.

*You should have a couple strips of old sealant that adheres to the pan when you remove the rear main seal housing. It is important you remove the old sealant strips because they will act as little tiny wipers. They will wipe away the bead of silicone you have applied to the housing and could cause an oil leak when you go to install the new assembly.

*Use a high temp RTV because you are installing a high temp seal.

*Apply sealant in a typical professional manor.

*Re-torque the rear main seal housing.

*Apply some extra sealant around the outside mating surfaces. Including: the pan, engine block, and rear main housing.

*Let it cure over night. You will probably not be ready for start up because you still need to assemble alot of stuff. But in case your an eight armmed octopus you might need to know.

Note: This is based on what has worked for me. You can learn from it, or try your own luck based on your own experience.

Good Luck and happy boosting!!!
:)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top