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1987 Supra Turbo R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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Discussion Starter #1
Should I run a cooling system flush with the old radiator first, and then put in the new radiator? That sounds logical right?

Also, in Southern California it NEVER freezes where I live and drive. I want to use something like Redline Water Wetter and more water than coolant. Any guidelines on this?
 

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Yes, I agree with the move to flush with the old radiator. Flushes are a chemical product that will liquify deposits and they'll flow out of your engine and also your radiator. Sure you're probably worried the old radiator's crud will end up in the block, which is a consideration. However, I'd be more concerned if you have a cruddy engine water jacket that the loose bits would end up in the much smaller aperatures of the new radiator. So not six of one, half dozen of the other, but I think flush with old rad is the better move, and flush well. On the water wetter, the coolant bottles have a table on the back to show minimum mixes, etc. There is a metric where too much coolant won't transfer heat as well, and too little coolant allows corrosion, deposits, and doesn't lubricate your water pump seals. There is a broad middle ground of ratios in these tables and I've never seen a bottle of coolant without one. Also, Water Wetter is good stuff but it's expensive. So, I'd go with the coolant/water mix personally.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I agree with the move to flush with the old radiator. Flushes are a chemical product that will liquify deposits and they'll flow out of your engine and also your radiator. Sure you're probably worried the old radiator's crud will end up in the block, which is a consideration. However, I'd be more concerned if you have a cruddy engine water jacket that the loose bits would end up in the much smaller aperatures of the new radiator. So not six of one, half dozen of the other, but I think flush with old rad is the better move, and flush well. On the water wetter, the coolant bottles have a table on the back to show minimum mixes, etc. There is a metric where too much coolant won't transfer heat as well, and too little coolant allows corrosion, deposits, and doesn't lubricate your water pump seals. There is a broad middle ground of ratios in these tables and I've never seen a bottle of coolant without one. Also, Water Wetter is good stuff but it's expensive. So, I'd go with the coolant/water mix personally.
Okay, that confirms what I was thinking. Better to flush out the block and the whole system as good as possible, THEN, put in the new radiator.

I'm wondering if the new radiator will actually solve the problem of a temp gauge that,while not overheating, it will warm up beyond half way, and then move a few notches up and down, never really settling at that default Toyota position of like 4 o'clock.

I know as it warms up as it is now, it will be an issue, and never mind driving to Las Vegas on occasion. That can be a deadly drive for cars as there are four 4K feet summits you drive through up and down on the way there, especially that 9 mile 3K feet climb out of Baker. I don't plan on driving it there often, but basically that would be a confidence course if i could. Its funny to think I drove this car from FL to CA in 97 when I moved here, in August, with no AC, and it made it. It wasn't even running as well as it is now :ROFLMAO: Young and idealistic.

Also I saw someone mention that I should spray the inter-cooler out with a water jet as it would cut down on the air flow. Mine doesn't look that dirty looking at it, but nothing surprises me on these cars anymore.
 

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The fluctuation would also make me wonder about the thermostat. A proper flush usually means thermostat removed, so get a new one to reinstall? On radiator/intercoolers, I spray mine out annually on our tow vehicle and every few years on the other cars. When cold, spray Simple Green into the radiator starting at the top and do the front and back. Let it soak and loosen the grime and dissolve the oil. Even a layer of light dust and road oil/grime acts as an insulator. I once did this and took the time to measure A/C vent temps before and after and got like a 4 degree difference.

After it soaks, start spraying from the engine bay forward if at all possible, to push stuff pinned by air against the front. Then finish by spraying from the front as you can likely get to more of it. I have never used a power washer for fear of these being strong enough to cut thin aluminum fins and such. Just strong garden hose spray.
 

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OK, I haven't followed all your newbe posts, but yes, as sci2000 said, when did you last put a new thermostat in it ?
Was it a high quality thermostat, or the cheapest chinese shit you could find ?
How did you purge all the air from the system ?
And being a 7M, how fresh is the head gasket ?

And for god's sake, stop quoting someone that just replied......or at least cut down on it.
 

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1987 Supra Turbo R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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Discussion Starter #7
Ok....my bad on the replying via quoting. Newb interface mistake. :)

Thermostat was changed in the last 6 months by whatever they gave me at Pep Boys when I first started bringing the car back online. I'll get a Toyota or something better.

Head Gasket was changed in 1997 by an indie shop in FL. I have no idea if they torqued the head to original or updated specs. I've put less than 40K miles on it since then. I'm keeping my eye on that as well, but it doesn't exhibit any of the symptoms I remember from that time, including spewing out the overflow tank, major overheating, etc etc. Oil looks fine, changed it yesterday.

Car runs great otherwise. Timed well, all new vacuum lines, hoses, valve cover gaskets, including number 4, no oil leaks, on and on. I've done quite a bit of work since October restoring.

I'll try the Simple Green and spraying forward on the inter-cooler approach. There is no debris that i can see on the surface on either side, but obviously its the stuff between the fins that needs to come clean.

Burping I've put it up on car ramps. No gurgling in the dash.

-Mike
 

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1987 Supra Turbo R154 Pearl White, Blue Velour
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Discussion Starter #8
Follow up. I just ordered a Mishimoto MMTS-SUP-86L thermostat. I'll see how that along with everything else works out.

Thanks
 

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First, an unknown quality head gasket change 3 years ago could be your issue.
It doesn't have to be a total failure, to be the cause.
Poorly done HG replacement can still allow high pressure combustion gasses to push into the coolant passages, and over time lead to gas pockets.
And the only way to really check is to load the engine, while watching the coolant, real tricky to pull off with a manual trans, easier if auto.
Bring it up to temp with the cap off, and purge funnel filled a couple of inches, then with the car in 5th gear, parking brake locked, and someone watching from the side, slip the clutch for a few seconds, while feeding the throttle.
If you have a boarder-line head gasket, it will constantly blow bubbles.

Purging like you did is close, but doing it with a purge funnel is better.
250640


So you ordered a chinese thermostat........
Good luck with that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Actually it was replaced "23" years ago :) But yes, this was way before I knew anything about Supra's, BHG known issues, all that. I will get around to checking that this year.

I'll see if I can pull off the bubble test. I might just use my old video camera to watch if i have no help.

And Mishimoto, the name is Japanese, but the company is U.S. based in Delaware (normal for corporations) but their warehouse is here in L.A. That makes sense because I'm sure the manufacturing is in Asia somewhere. I won't know for sure until it arrives tomorrow, but we'll see.

I haven't seen that model of a flush and fill system. I have the older Prestone type I was looking at using, but I'll check that out.
 

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I'm reluctant to use chemical flushes because if you have a head gasket on the edge of failure it could push it over. If you do a chemical flush be sure to re-flush with plenty of water and better to use distilled water for the final and in your anti-freeze if you mix yourself. Years ago I used bar's leak with the black pellets to fix a leak and it made my upper radiator hose turn into a swollen sausage under pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I will definitely flush it out well. That's a good point about flush chemicals not playing friendly with the head gasket. I should be doing the work this weekend and I'll report back.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Update

I was able to flush the system and got it running completely clear. I used the Peak flush and fill kit which worked out perfectly.

Pulled out the old radiator, put in the new Mishimoto. Also installed a Mishimoto "racing" thermostat that opens at 158F. Just by looking at the cheap thermostat I took out vs. the Mishimoto, you can visually see its built much better. Of course the price point is literally 5x higher as well.

I started with Redline water wetter, and then Toyota Red coolant around half a gallon. The rest regular water.

The car burped fine and stays pressurized perfectly.

No more dashboard gurgle/waterfall sound. Temperature gauge stays at its very happy 4 o'clock OEM position through all driving. (idle, casual driving, turbo engaged acceleration up hills, etc.) No more temperature gauge wandering. And the heater blows plenty hot when turned on.

I am one happy camper at this point. (y) :)
 
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