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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I removed my broken harmonic balancer, which was really a bitch to get off.
I noticed some small rust and other rough patches on the crankshaft (especially around the key) where the balancer sat.
The timing gear is even worse. Ruined my pulling tool half way, so I now first have to get a new one before I can continue.

My question is, if its so hard to get them both off, how the hell can I put them back on? I wont be able to hammer them on, because theres simply not enough space in the engine bay.
Should I clean all the surfaces first? How do I do that without scratching them?
Should I get a new timing gear to be safe?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Anyone?
There are some superficial rust patches (which I cant even feel with my finger) and some dark stuff around the keys, which feels very rough and probably caused most of the resistance.
How about some metal polish?

I read some people say that the timing gear should go off very easily, even by hand in some cases. It was completely impossible without a pulling tool in my case. Though it was much much easier with my new tool.
So any other tips how to easily get the gear and harmonic balancer on again?
Some said heating them up might help, but wont that hurt the new front seal?
 

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The front crank pulley, at least on the GTE is a dampener. It’s not a harmonic balancer.

The almighty GTE is internally balanced, unlike inferior, externally balanced clunker boxes and as built, does not require a harmonic balancer.

As it’s name implies, it dampens, I would assume drive belt wiggles and shakes. That way, you feel a nice smooth feel from the engine that was touched by the hand of whatever you believe in. :)

it’s two pieces, sammiched between some rubber. I’ve slung one apart before. I know others have to. I know one owner that it slung apart through the top of his hood several years ago under full load at the track.

YMMV, but I wouldn’t screw with it. My fear is that any crap you do it could harm it. If you can still buy OEM, get a new one.

Otherwise, investigate some of the fine aftermarket offerings that are available.
 

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And I didn’t read your posts all the way. :)

You can get some fine grit paper, with a lubricant and clean those surfaces. You don’t have to ham fist it. Just spend some time to carefully clean and level out any corrosion.

I always use a light film of assembly lube when sliding that on.

Be careful with the timing gear too. The back piece can separate from the pulley and you will have timing issues.

I had a new replacement tack welded 15 years ago to prevent that.

Getting the two off is always way harder than it is to go on. It’s just how it works.
 

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Have dealt with this on lots of Toyotas, but the JZ engines are by far the worst.

What I always do is clean the crap out of it with brake cleaner, lightly sand the snout itself and the top of the key, and reinstall the pulleys with a mild bit of white multipurpose grease. I then use light hammer taps with an extension to get the timing pulley over the keys.

The OEM pulley goes back on easy after. I did an ATI which was tighter. I lightly sanded the ATI, applied a light coat of antiseize to the snout (cleaned off grease), and installed using my old crank pulley bolt. Went on easy with my HF electric 3/8 impact and the bolt threads were perfectly fine. I replaced the bolt anyway though because the outside was rusty.
 
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