Supra Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I thought this would be the most appropreate to post this.

The other night, me and a friend with a s13 were discussing poly and nylon bushings. He also brought up the idea of solid bushings. He remembered a couple years back on 240sx forums, some of the members used a stack of washers in place of control arm bushings. I thought the idea was kinda ghetto but it's still a concept that I havent really heard about. I tried to google up any info on this and came up with very little. I found nice machined aluminium bushing for some domestic cars but thats about it. So this is why I have turned to posting some questiions here.

Are there any benefits over nylon bushings?
Has anyone looked into this or done this on any car?
If so, did you use washers or machined bushings?

Btw I am NOT talking about sub frame bushings.
Thank you to anyone that takes there time to read my post :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,437 Posts
I dont think washers would be a good idea, too much room to move around. But, the idea of a cnc's solid bushing sounds like it would be practical for the track, not sure about the street, I really dont know wnough about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
solid nylon bushings definatley tighten handling and road feel but worsen ride for the street. The more road race the suspension gets the worse it gets for street comfort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,581 Posts
No personal experience, but in addition to ride quality from what I recall often hearing about old school Ferrari's being used on the street, they had all sold bushings, the frequent maintenance/bushing replacement required is a factor many will not want to put up with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
934 Posts
i say polyurethane... more streetable but still big improvement over stock's, very durable, and more forgiving handling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
One big problem is dealing with the misalignment inherent in the system. The ears on the car are not exactly lined up with the eyes in the arm. Whatever bushing or bearing that makes the pivot must handle that misalignment without binding or introducing too much play that messes up the car's alignment. Rubber and polyurethane flexes, and spherical bearings can rotate in all 3 axes. A solid bearing, like a bronze sleeve bearing, must be loose enough to handle that misalignment, which certainly would result in too much slop. Even spherical bearings usually have a nomex/teflon liner to add some compliance to the system.

You're asking for trouble with metal sleeve bearings, unless you "float" the metal sleeve in some sort of compliant plastic.

My first front lower control arm bearings were a phenolic bearing held in the arm with some 80A polyurethane. It worked well, and I'll do that again when my current set up of 75D tubes held in place with 80A wear out in another 75,000 miles... My upper arm bearings are also 75D polyu., which works quite nicely without too much rattling.

All my 75D is carbon-impregnated to keep the squeaking down without grease. It's the duck's guts.

Steel on steel is the worst possible bearing.

Asterix
 

·
OG
Joined
·
1,059 Posts
Back in the early 80's my friends bought a Fiat SUper Brava racecar that the previous owners had replaced many of the bushings with steel joints - that care tore the crap out of its suspension just about every race, and they were convinced that it was a dud. WHen we got to it, the first thing we did was to replace the busjings ( I don't remember what with) and the car started to finish (and win) races.

As asterix suggests, you might experience major failures, not only with the little misalignments, but with the brutal transfer od loads through to the mounting points of the suspension.

You need some degee of "give" and metal will not provide that.

Cheers
Rich B.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top