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Whats up guys,

My Supra had white indiglo gauges installed which replaced the factory black ones apparently. Whoever installed them must of moved the pin on the speedo gauge b/c its off now making it seem like im going faster then i really am. Does anyone know any places that can calibrate this for me and fix it? Would an ordinary garage be able to do this kind of job?

Any feedback would be great!
 

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Get yourself a gps and drive the car while on cruise control and place the needle where its supposed to be.
 

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I can calibrate those tachometers and speedometers using electronic laboratory equipment (a pulse generator and an oscilloscope) on the bench--I had to figure it out since I was doing some major retrofits of my gauge cluster. More precise and safer than "drive at 60mph and stick the needles in" methods. I'm pretty sure that's how the factory calibrates these gauges too.

For the record the factory vehicle speed sensor (VSS) is geared to send out exactly 4000 pulses for every mile driven. From there it's straight math to determine how many pulses-per-second the speedometer gets for every mph. :)

PM me if you want help.
 

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Hardtop FTW!
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Stu can do the calibration as well, just another option. He can calibrate for different wheel/tire diameters too. I would skip the driving and plopping on the needle method. Send the speedo out and have someone with an oscilloscope set the gauge correctly.
 

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Stock Twins King
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i would love to have it calibrated if you were in CT or the Northeast for that matter. Hopefully i can find a place around here that does that kinda work. Can toyota do it directly?
I can do all the calibrations in one night. I have done dozens of cluster retro jobs where I had needed to remove all needles. I can also adjust to wheel off sets as mentioned above. I probably wont charge anything, maybe $50 for shipping and insurance. ANother option is to buy a 555 timer and use a good quality voltmeter that reads frequency and do it your self.

Stu
 
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