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1987 7MGTE
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After 20 years I think it's time to change the low pressure hoses again for the power steering lines because some black specks are showing up in the reservoir screen plus the pump has started to grown a bit with no steering wheel input. The online Toyota diagrams are less than helpful. They show a part number 44348A that requires more digging to determine which part number is for the reservoir on the fender or the reservoir next to the cam position sensor. The part number for the Turbo car with the reservoir next to the cam position sensor turns out to be 44348-14120. The other longer feed hose for reservoirs that are on the fender is 44348-14100. Turns out I cannot find the Turbo car hose hose anywhere now so I'm to the point were I'm going to take my ancient spare part to Napa and try and match up the shape in a longer hose and cut it out. The hose inside diameter needs to be 5/8 or 16 mm which is the diameter of the metal pipes. The overall length of the original part is about 6 inches with the 60° bend being slightly off center toward the top. Has anyone found a donor hose out there to cut a replacement out of? The low pressure connecting lines are much easier since you can use 3/8 oil hose. I already have some Continental Derale oil hose that works as engine or transmission (power steering) oil hose. I have replaced the engine oil cooler hoses in the past with this hose. It's best to use a ideal type hose clamp for the hose that comes out of the oil filter housing. The Toyota spring clamp can't keep enough tension when that hose starts to get hard and begins to leak.

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Ideal 52F16 for 3/8 inside diameter hose
 

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Stock 1989 Supra Turbo w/ Sport Roof
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I used the 5/8 inch push lock hose from DM when I redid my power steering system for the feed line from the reservoir (mine was metal, not plastic). I also used some spring clamps from an Amazon kit. They seem decent. Keep in mind I double clamped every connection on every power steering hose. The hose on DM is really good stuff, but the 3/8 inch hose for the return line and cooler line is very very tight. Soaking in boiling water may help with those. The 5/8 inch hose for the feed line fits very nicely. I believe it was continental brand hose for hydraulic systems.
 

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1987 7MGTE
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I used the 5/8 inch push lock hose from DM when I redid my power steering system for the feed line from the reservoir (mine was metal, not plastic). I also used some spring clamps from an Amazon kit. They seem decent. Keep in mind I double clamped every connection on every power steering hose. The hose on DM is really good stuff, but the 3/8 inch hose for the return line and cooler line is very very tight. Soaking in boiling water may help with those. The 5/8 inch hose for the feed line fits very nicely. I believe it was continental brand hose for hydraulic systems.
I'm worried using straight hose will cause a kink, especially when it's warmed up.
 

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Take the old hose to a parts store during a not-busy time, and ask one of the counter dudes if he can walk you into the back where they have a bunch of misc shaped/fitted hoses hanging. Find a longer hose that has a suitable section and buy it and cut it to match the length and pre-formed bend you need. Keep in mind it might be a middle section or end section of a much longer and more complicated hose.
For best selection, go to the 'hub' location for that franchise that has the largest stock on hand.

If you need to use a generic straight hose section, and it kinks at all after being installed, move a Toyota OEM spring clamp over the spot where it kinks to force the hose to stay circular. It's a little unsightly but it works like a charm.
 

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Stock 1989 Supra Turbo w/ Sport Roof
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I'm worried using straight hose will cause a kink, especially when it's warmed up.
Yeah mine did develop a minor kink, but I think that was due to installer error since I had too much hose on there. I had to work my way in to snug it up, much better now though.
 

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1987 7MGTE
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
use the part number to go to the Toyota dealship.
Well, if I got in my time machine and went back 10 years, maybe. I checked all over online including my local dealer, no dice. I'm not going to order anything from Japan, which it would be the last resort. I am contemplating a sneaky repair that involves a 45° angle 1/2" copper pipe and 2 pieces of straight rubber 5/8 transmission hose. Stay tuned...
 

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Ah i didn't realize that you had the part numbers I checked the one I was looking in toyodiy and it was showing still avail but your part number isn't .
 

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I am contemplating a sneaky repair that involves a 45° angle 1/2" copper pipe and 2 pieces of straight rubber 5/8 transmission hose. Stay tuned...
I did this for my radiator upper hose, works just fine. May not look quite proper, but when your water neck isn't OEM, sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.

Whatever you do, make sure the hose you choose is compatible with ATF.
 

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Stock 1989 Supra Turbo w/ Sport Roof
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I did this for my radiator upper hose, works just fine. May not look quite proper, but when your water neck isn't OEM, sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.

Whatever you do, make sure the hose you choose is compatible with ATF.
To build off of this, you might even flare the end so you can get some better clamping on there. It's low pressure so it shouldn't matter, but it's also a PITA to get to without removing the intake.

Material shouldn't matter too much I wouldn't think. Most uncoated metals should be fine with ATF, but do consider corrosion as a factor.

Very smart idea though, I may have to borrow this at some point with non-silicone OE hose being hard to find these days. 🙂
 

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To build off of this, you might even flare the end so you can get some better clamping on there. It's low pressure so it shouldn't matter, but it's also a PITA to get to without removing the intake.

Material shouldn't matter too much I wouldn't think. Most uncoated metals should be fine with ATF, but do consider corrosion as a factor.

Very smart idea though, I may have to borrow this at some point with non-silicone OE hose being hard to find these days. 🙂
I meant material compatibility in regards to the hose material. The metal will be fine, but hose material varies on what fluids can be used with them. When the hose is exposed to incompatible fluids, the hose usually deteriorates and will start to flake apart.

Not big on silicone? I love the stuff. Have yet to have a piece of it crack and break from heat or age. :)
 
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Stock 1989 Supra Turbo w/ Sport Roof
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I meant material compatibility in regards to the hose material. The metal will be fine, but hose material varies on what fluids can be used with them. When the hose is exposed to incompatible fluids, the hose usually deteriorates and will start to flake apart.

Not big on silicone? I love the stuff. Have yet to have a piece of it crack and break from heat or age. :)
I gotcha, misunderstood is all 🙂

I haven't had the best of luck with silicone hose. My coolant hose is a silicone hose that drips a little when I squeeze it. My ventilation hose also just kind of weeps through the silicone so it gets an oily mist on it. I'd be more willing to bet that it's the quality of hose rather than material though. All my vacuum hose is silicone and it's way better than the regular rubber stuff. Typically I really like silicone hose but I've had a fair few issues probably due to cheap hose or incompatible silicones (not oil rated etc.). As always it depends on the application though.
 

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The only oil rated silicone hose is one with a non-silicone liner.
I never really considered it, I didn't realize silicone wasn't compatible with petroleum. Pretty sure I've only ever used it for coolant, intake, and vacuum, but now I'm wondering.

Pretty sure all the oil lines on my car are PTFE lined braided hoses.
 
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