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Toyota released this today. Sort of expected I guess.

TORRANCE, Calif., Feb. 3, 2016 – Scion, established as a separate brand in 2003 as a laboratory to explore new products and processes to attract youth customers, is now transitioning back to the Toyota brand. Scion achieved its goals of developing unique products and processes, and bringing in new, younger customers to Toyota. With more than a million cars sold, 70 percent of Scions were purchased by customers new to Toyota and 50 percent were under 35 years old.

“This isn’t a step backward for Scion; it’s a leap forward for Toyota. Scion has allowed us to fast track ideas that would have been challenging to test through the Toyota network,” said Jim Lentz, founding vice president of Scion and now CEO, Toyota Motor North America. “I was there when we established Scion and our goal was to make Toyota and our dealers stronger by learning how to better attract and engage young customers. I’m very proud because that’s exactly what we have accomplished.

“We could not have achieved the success we have had without the incredible support of Scion’s customers, dealers and team members, so supporting them throughout this transition process will be one of our top priorities,” said Lentz.

Toyota’s decision was made in response to customers’ needs. Today’s younger buyers still want fun-to-drive vehicles that look good, but they are also more practical. They, like their parents, have come to appreciate the Toyota brand and its traditional attributes of quality, dependability and reliability. At the same time, new Toyota vehicles have evolved to feature the dynamic styling and handling young people desire.

Scion has consistently been the youngest brand in the auto industry with an average age of 36 years old. At 29, the tC sports coupe has the lowest-average age buyer in the industry. The most recent additions to the line-up, the iA sedan and iM 5-door hatchback, are bringing in new buyers with 70 percent being first-time new car purchasers. Additionally, more than 50 percent of iM and iA buyers are under 35 years old.

As part of the brand transition, beginning in August 2016, MY17 Scion vehicles will be rebadged as Toyotas. The FR-S sports car, iA sedan and iM 5-door hatchback will become part of the Toyota family. The tC sports coupe will have a final release series edition and end production in August 2016. The C-HR, which recently debuted at the L.A. Auto Show, will be a part of the Toyota line-up.

The service and repair process for Scion customers will be unaffected by this change as customers will continue to visit Toyota dealerships’ service departments.

“We appreciate our 1,004 Scion dealers and the support they’ve given the brand,” said Bob Carter, Toyota senior vice president of automotive operations. “We believe our dealers have gained valuable insights and have received a strong return on their investment. During this time of transition, we will work closely with them to support this process and help communicate this change to customers.”

Scion’s 22 dedicated team members, who represent sales, marketing, distribution, strategy, and product and accessories planning, will have the opportunity to take on new jobs at Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. in Torrance. Scion regional representatives will assume different responsibilities in their respective Toyota sales offices.

“Scion has had some amazing products over the years and our current vehicles are packed with premium features at value prices,” said Andrew Gilleland, Scion vice president. “It’s been a great run and I’m proud that the spirit of Scion will live on through the knowledge and products soon to be available through the Toyota network.”
 

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Ha Ha, can't help to interpret this as a failed experiment, now reverting back to Toyota. Anyway...Scion's are wack.
 

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ha ha, can't help to interpret this as a failed experiment, now reverting back to toyota. Anyway...scion's are wack.
x100
 

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Reverend Hillclimb
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Always told my brother if he got an FR-s to rebadge it with the toyota logo or debadge it.
I cant take it serious, its a "kids" logo if that makes sense?
It makes it seem unrefined, like a "cheaper" alternative (quoted due to subjectivity)
I am happy about this
 

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Master Shit Fixer
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I saw this FR-S with a Toyota badge a month or so ago:

IMG_20150610_184225_256.jpg
 

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NY56637
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Always told my brother if he got an FR-s to rebadge it with the toyota logo or debadge it.
I cant take it serious, its a "kids" logo if that makes sense?
It makes it seem unrefined, like a "cheaper" alternative (quoted due to subjectivity)
I am happy about this
I agree. Something about Scion just seems too much like "the girl in highshool who was given a new car". I know that is not always the case but that's my initial thought when seeing one.
 

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I cant help but feel like they put in zero effort to scion. Aside from that one particular joint project with Subaru were they made a car that some people wanted to drive.

I picture every other scion board meeting going like this-
CEO-"Guys we need to be more exciting".
Designer-"What if we make a corolla with 2 doors and an extra sayyyyy......6 horse power?"
CEO- "YES, YES, YES".
Other Designer-"I KNOW, what if we make a bus or like a box with some doors on it?"
CEO- "Well that doesn't sound exciting".
Other Designer-"What if we make it yellow?"
CEO- "YES, Promotions all around the room! OK, I'm going to lunch for the next 13 years."
 

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I cant help but feel like they put in zero effort to scion. Aside from that one particular joint project with Subaru were they made a car that some people wanted to drive.

I picture every other scion board meeting going like this-
CEO-"Guys we need to be more exciting".
Designer-"What if we make a corolla with 2 doors and an extra sayyyyy......6 horse power?"
CEO- "YES, YES, YES".
Other Designer-"I KNOW, what if we make a bus or like a box with some doors on it?"
CEO- "Well that doesn't sound exciting".
Other Designer-"What if we make it yellow?"
CEO- "YES, Promotions all around the room! OK, I'm going to lunch for the next 13 years."
This is hilarious I'd give you a +1 if I could.

I was never a fan of Scion but they did appeal to younger buyers coming from the generation that it was catered to. Now they get to bring them back as Toyota customers, how successful they were or it will be to real them in I'm not sure. Its just a pity Toyota can't add sports cars under its own logo.
 

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daredevil racecar builder
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Scion is a brand for teenager girls and middle aged Wal-Mart parking lot car meet faggots that vape.

and it puts the rest the idea that the next gen supra/ ft-1 successor comes here as a scion
Whoever had that idea is a fucking retard. The FR-S was the most expensive "Scion" branded car.

I cant help but feel like they put in zero effort to scion. Aside from that one particular joint project with Subaru were they made a car that some people wanted to drive.
The Scion xB and FR-S are both rebadged Toyotas. Stupid Canadians.
 

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Never narc'd on nobody
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I cant help but feel like they put in zero effort to scion. Aside from that one particular joint project with Subaru were they made a car that some people wanted to drive.

I picture every other scion board meeting going like this-
CEO-"Guys we need to be more exciting".
Designer-"What if we make a corolla with 2 doors and an extra sayyyyy......6 horse power?"
CEO- "YES, YES, YES".
Other Designer-"I KNOW, what if we make a bus or like a box with some doors on it?"
CEO- "Well that doesn't sound exciting".
Other Designer-"What if we make it yellow?"
CEO- "YES, Promotions all around the room! OK, I'm going to lunch for the next 13 years."
:lol:

Maybe to attract younger people, you need to make cars and packages that are actually exciting...instead of building boring/weird stuff with 10 year old engines and trying to tell people it's exciting.
 

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Scion Died Because Toyota Never Really Gave A Shit
Scion is no more. Dead. Fin. We’ve seen this coming for years, but if we’re being honest, everyone should have seen it from day one. On Scion’s first official day of sales, in 2003, it sold a car called the xA. And the xA can explain the death of Scion, more than 12 years later.

I know it sounds absurd that a 12-year-old car, produced for only two years, could be responsible for the death of an entire brand. It’s not like all of Scion’s managers were mowed down by unintentionally-accelerating xAs, however much they may or may not have deserved it. It’s what it represented.

Scion was always supposed to be Toyota’s brand for the Youths, whatever that meant. At the end of the day, people under the age of 30 were supposed to buy them. That was way off the mark. By 2005, barely a few years into doing business, the average Scion buyer was in their mid-to-high 30s, the New York Times reported at the time.

Teens? College kids? Not so much. Scion’s thesis statement, the image it launched with, was half right and half a profane insult to the intelligence of the people who were supposed to buy it. I know, because I was one of them.


Scion debuted with two cars, the xA and the xB. The xB was a funky box that had personality. The xA was decidedly not. It was a beige, boring hatchback. The same kind of beige, boring cars that Toyota had made for the preceding ten years and has made ever since. No one was rushing to be your friend when you had a Scion xA. It had no power and no style.

And that’s actually what young people want. Something with either a fast, loud engine that annoys parents, or something that at least looks good. The xA was neither of those things. The quintessential young person’s car, the Ford Mustang, was genius upon its debut. It conjured up images of beauty, purpose, and speed—even if its original 260-cubic inch V8 wasn’t that powerful.

(Perhaps Scion came closest to this with the tC coupe, which while hardly a Mustang, attracted the brand’s youngest buyers and sold the most units over the years.)



The xA, on the other hand, didn’t conjure up much more than potato. With a generous financing package. Sure, Scion tried with the xA, as much as you try making dinner for someone you hate. It offered ambient color-changing light strips, because young people like shiny things, sure. And if you were very ambitious, you could futz around with some sort of company-approved aftermarket accessories, like a “cold air intake,” which relatively few xA buyers actually signed up for.

It blared a message to the world that from this day forth, in 2003, “Scion” would mean, at least in part, the same boring, bland hatchback that your grandmother would love, but now available for purchase by no-credit buyers.

But was it Scion’s fault, really? Or was it Toyota’s fault? Despite a stated willingness to offer cars that young people wanted, very few of those cars ever showed up. And it wasn’t because Toyota didn’t have cars to offer from its impressive Japanese stable, though federalization and import costs were almost certainly barriers in many cases to true JDM weirdness.

It sounds like it’s because Toyota didn’t know what to do with Scion, so it just sort of languished. Back in 2012, when Scion was undergoing yet another aimless re-tooling, one of its initial leaders Jim Farley explained the reasoning behind the whole brand:

Curiously, former Scion chief – and now rival Ford’s global marketing czar – Jim Farley has revealed that the primary goal behind Scion was to create a place where Toyota to experiment with minimal risk.

"The idea was that it would experience less damage with a failure than the “mother” brand, as Toyota did when it took an image hit from the failure of the deeply unloved Echo, a few years back."
But there weren’t many big experiments, not really. Sure the first xB was funky, and the FR-S (and its twin the Subaru BRZ) was the car enthusiasts demanded, but that seemed to be about it. Anything that could even be properly called an experiment was dumped pretty quickly. The Scion iQ, which most people seem to have mistaken for a dishwasher, saw slow sales and an unceremonious death.

Scion’s high point came in 2006, when it sold 173,034 cars, but by 2012, its sales were down to 73,505. Nearly all of Scion’s offerings saw a decline in sales, except the FR-S, as Automotive News noted in 2013. And the FR-S has been lagging lately too, moving just 500 examples last month.


The previous “experiments” were no more. The xA was replaced by the xD, which was really just more of the same. The second-generation xB, which launched in 2007, is technically still on the market today. But unlike the boxy original, it was softened, made more mainstream and less interesting.

Further “experiments” seem to have been shut down. As Scion’s dealers begged for more interesting, more varied, or even flat-out just more cars to sell, Toyota said no. Akio Toyoda, Toyota’s chief, told Scion dealers two years ago to just “be patient,” while they waited for new cars to sell, Automotive News reported in the same story. The brand, exclusive to the U.S. and Canada, was low on the order of things that needed to be done.

“Toyota has limited resources,” Toyoda said. “We need to prioritize. I have been telling them they will have to wait a few years.”

At a time when Toyota, like every automaker, was still climbing out of the recession and still recovering from a costly unintended acceleration scandal, that was code for “Scion is the least of my fucking problems right now.”

But Toyoda then set up a question for which there was no answer:

“The concept of the Scion has changed since its launch. It was supposed to do what the Toyota brand couldn’t,” he said.

“It started winning volume, and that can be done by Toyota. We wanted to attract customers who weren’t satisfied by Toyota or who might be future Toyota customers.”
If Scion wasn’t supposed to do what it originally set out to—to experiment and win young and new buyers—then what was it supposed to do in its second iteration?

I’m not sure there was supposed to be an answer. U.S. execs talked about making Scion a “small premium” brand, something close to Mini or the Audi A3 and Mercedes CLA, but that clearly never happened. Again, because Scion wasn’t given the product for it.

Instead it got afterthoughts. There was a re-badged Japanese-market hatchback Corolla, and a re-badged Mazda 2. But that was it. There were no real sedans (beyond that Mazda, which was just launched), there were no SUVs or crossovers as that segment started to explode.

It was just, well, Scion. Sure, Toyota had more cars, and more interesting cars, in its home market, but selling them here seemed like an afterthought. A more powerful FR-S never came.

Scion’s owner always seemed to be holding the brand back because it didn’t understand what it wanted, or even what young people wanted. It only seemed to want to offer the same bland, boring economy cars that young people despised.

Except this time, it took the press photo in a city, in front of some graffiti. And for more money, maybe some pretty lights. Great.
 

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Pumps 1 and 2, hit 'em!
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So... can we have a turbo variant to the FRS/GT86 now?
Yes. It's called the Alfa Romeo 4C. :D

The aftermarket has made this for us. I owned a BRZ for two years, modding it to this level doesn't create a strong value proposition to the WRX which is backed by the factory this way.
 

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The only good I can see of this is huge depreciation of FR-S values and scooping one up to gut and swap to make a RR track car...
 
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