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ok. everyone keeps saying different things about thermostats. If i put a lower number therm. will my supra run colder? someone said that a higher number is better because then you know when it gets hotter?

Can someone clarify this? Thanks you
 

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1.5JZ Turbo Supra
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i think stock is 180, get 180.
 

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A.E. Motorsports
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Is the 180 a different part number? If so what is it? Will the stock temp gauge show the difference?
 

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basically all newer cars tempature gauges are 3 postions switches. atleast with toyota's, nissans, and mazda's.

i have a real autometer gauge as well as the stock temp gauge. and as far as readings go, when the stock gauge hits normal operating temp its at or around 150 deg F. and when it finally starts to head north the temp is already above 220 deg F. and i put the autometer sensor in basically the same spot as the factory gauge sensor.

which still isn't as bad as my 240sx which didn't start to head north unitl the motor was about 250 deg F.

i personally don't run any thermostat, but if i do i modify it to allow for more flow and to not trap air bubbles.
 

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A.E. Motorsports
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You CAN'T post something like that without explaining!!! Please go on... Way to leave me hangin!! What happens when you don't run one? How did you modify it?? (Sorry but you realy peaked my interest LOL)
 

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hahahahahahhahhahahhahhahaaha, sorry. well i am into drifting and do it professionally, so i am hard on cooling systems. 7m's are a little different becasue they have the thermostat in the top housing while most other cars are on the bottom. nissan motors like the sr20 and ka24 have really bad problems with trapping air inthe cooling systems. and this will lead to blowing the head gasket. so to combat this i take the thermostat and drill 2 small holes on the top and bottom to let all the air bubbles pass threw even if the thermostat is closed. this also effectively lowers the temperature your engine will operate at. drilling a 180 deg thermo with 2 holes makes it run at about 150 deg. so this gives a bigger window of operation before the engine starts to get hot. and improves flow.
 

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i have a real autometer gauge as well as the stock temp gauge. and as far as readings go, when the stock gauge hits normal operating temp its at or around 150 deg F. and when it finally starts to head north the temp is already above 220 deg F. and i put the autometer sensor in basically the same spot as the factory gauge sensor.
Either something is wrong with your Chinameter gauge, or its experiencing some sort of heat soak, or something else is wrong with your system. My Toyota thermostat starts to flow exactly when its supposed to, almost to the exact degree its stamped at. It will then quickly get too cool as the near ambient coolant in the radiator starts to circulate, fluctuating between 90C and 75C until it stabilizes at normal operating (88C) temp at which point it fluctuates very little.

In addition to that, our thermostat has a provision for allowing air to get past it while closed, so its a non-issue.

Stock is somewhere around 190, according to the range accepted in the TSRM.

DO NOT modify your thermostat because you think you're exceeding the capacity of the cooling system (I can pretty much guarantee you aren't if its working correctly), especially DO NOT run without one. The only thing you'll do is create tons of wear and EFI problems.
 

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Either something is wrong with your Chinameter gauge, or its experiencing some sort of heat soak, or something else is wrong with your system. My Toyota thermostat starts to flow exactly when its supposed to, almost to the exact degree its stamped at. It will then quickly get too cool as the near ambient coolant in the radiator starts to circulate, fluctuating between 90C and 75C until it stabilizes at normal operating (88C) temp at which point it fluctuates very little.

In addition to that, our thermostat has a provision for allowing air to get past it while closed, so its a non-issue.

Stock is somewhere around 190, according to the range accepted in the TSRM.

DO NOT modify your thermostat because you think you're exceeding the capacity of the cooling system (I can pretty much guarantee you aren't if its working correctly), especially DO NOT run without one. The only thing you'll do is create tons of wear and EFI problems.
um, i was talking about the stock gauge. and were it reads at. not that the thermostat makes the car over heat. and my car runs fine without one with no hicups. and i can garuntee that i have exceeded my cooling systems capacity. there hasn't been a cooling system yet i can't overheat on demand. again i'm not talking about regular driving. i'm talking about overheating and when the stock gauge starts to read hot. by the time your stock gauge starts to even move upwards your already over 220 degree's f.
 

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Jeff is right, of course. I called Toyota and they told me that the stock thermostat is 88 degrees Celsius = 190 degrees fahrenheit. I'm going to get another Tstat from Toyota, they are not expensive at all, and see if that changes my overheating issues. Oh and the stock gauge is WORHTLESS! My autometer is read up to 230 degrees, and the stock one has stayed in the regular operating temp position... it makes me sad.
 

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Grumpy Old Man
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NO T STAT will make a motor run "cooler" once it is making power/heat that is governed by the rest of the cooling system.

A lower temp rated T Stat will make the car run cooler at low throttle openings so your Heater will be less effective.
 
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