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I have looked around and can't seem to find any threads about this. If someone wanted to build a 2jz on a budget and build it up as they can afford it or have the power increase as they're skills increase, what would be the starting point. Maybe say a beginner build that is liquid in its parts. What would I start with if I wanted to do that. I know there's no definition of x part will give x hp. But with a target of 800 hp, what part would I start with on a bones stock 2jz. I want to start at 400 and slowly increase as my skills and wallet do.
Any help is much appreciated.
This is my first post on here and hope I got this in the right place.
 

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Mind if I do a J?
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Welcome to the forum. Your question has so many variables it would be almost impossible to answer it in a single post. Luckily this question has been asked a million times on this forum so I would suggest taking some time to search and pull together information from multiple threads to give you an idea of what you need then go from there.
 

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iSPOOL
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I have looked around and can't seem to find any threads about this. If someone wanted to build a 2jz on a budget and build it up as they can afford it or have the power increase as they're skills increase, what would be the starting point. Maybe say a beginner build that is liquid in its parts. What would I start with if I wanted to do that. I know there's no definition of x part will give x hp. But with a target of 800 hp, what part would I start with on a bones stock 2jz. I want to start at 400 and slowly increase as my skills and wallet do.
Any help is much appreciated.
This is my first post on here and hope I got this in the right place.
You have the same goal I had in mind years ago so I'll tell you what I did. Ensure your engine(long block) are in top shape before upgrading the power. Things I would do is weld your timing gear, upgrade your crank pulley, replace your front & rear main seals, get a brand new serpentine, timing belt and timing belt tensioner.

Search on this forum to see threads of other owner's builds. You can also search YouTube videos of Supras which usually have a rundown of parts for their setups. Go to websites like Real Street, PowerHouse Racing and others to see what their single turbo kits are composed of to get an idea of prices. If you have a tuner in mind see what EMS they recommend. I went single turbo when I didn't have a lot of money but I bought my setup part by part from other forum members. I installed the parts I felt comfortable with to save money but there's things I left for the pros. I'm a transmission swap away from hitting my goal of 700rwhp.

You'll go back and forth on what you want in the end but time spent researching will be anyone's best advice before you start spending money.
 

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Your first purchase might as well be a full gasket kit. You'll use them eventually as you sort through the motor. If the motor is out of the car, go for a full refresh. If its in the car, you can still knock a lot of stuff out. I've done the following on my engine during various upgrades

Valve Stem Seals
Valve cover gaskets
Cam seals
Front Main Seal
Water pump and seal
Rear main seal (during clutch upgrade)
Exhaust manifold gasket
Intake manifold gasket and Intake plenum gasket
Water neck gaskets

As Shady 2jz said, replace all the timing parts. Address all your potential leaks. A healthy stock motor can make the power you are after
 

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Also, why do you guys recommend "finding a tuner and seeing what ECU they recommend"? You are willing to spend all this money and time wrenching on your car, learning how to wrench.... but then you don't want to learn how to use a laptop and a wideband?

I assure you that tuning isn't magic. I'd encourage you to learn your car. It's like taking your girl to some other dude because he tweaks her nipples better than you can.... sure and pay him to do it too.... because you "don't know how."
 

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From the land down under
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Im guessing it is because most people dont want to spend thousands of dollars on building a motor, and then risk the whole lot on trying to tune it themselves.

Im not suggesting that tuning a car is some black magic voodoo, but the reality is that "most" people who have spent big money on their Supra, or any other car for that matter, have probably paid a tuner to give it the finishing touches. :)

Also, computers dont come naturally to a lot of people. It can seem like a foreign language to a lot of people, even if you understand the theory behind it.
 

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iSPOOL
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Also, why do you guys recommend "finding a tuner and seeing what ECU they recommend"? You are willing to spend all this money and time wrenching on your car, learning how to wrench.... but then you don't want to learn how to use a laptop and a wideband?

I assure you that tuning isn't magic. I'd encourage you to learn your car. It's like taking your girl to some other dude because he tweaks her nipples better than you can.... sure and pay him to do it too.... because you "don't know how."
This is a case of knowing your audience. Reading his first post there's nothing that clues us in to his ability to build a 800hp car and tune it himself...
Depending on the area where someone lives their choice in tuners is quite limited. We have seen posts of people asking for tuning assistance since no one in their area can work with [xx] ECU or only tunes a certain brand. Personally speaking to tune properly and safely I rather have a professional set the configurations on a dyno rather than in the streets.

Everyone has their level of comfortability whether its cars, cooking, cleaning, designing, rehabilitating, construction, etc. Lol Lets be honest you cannot sit here and say you do everything yourself. I wouldn't say "getting a contractor to rebuilt your house after a tornado is similar to your girl getting pounded by Jody down the street. Rebuild it yourself." That's a bit ridiculous.
 

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iSPOOL
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Wrong hobby bro. Your wallet isn't going to increase by upgrading a car, it's going to decrease.
Well like the OP when I first started I didn't have a high paying job, over time my wallet increase with my career advancement. At first I had difficulty buying $300 taillights. Fast forward to today I have the ability to buy our latest Supra with cash. Its weird since I have access to more funds I spent more on vacations and experiences than upgrading my car. People and priorities change.
 

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I wouldn't say "getting a contractor to rebuilt your house after a tornado is similar to your girl getting pounded by Jody down the street. Rebuild it yourself." That's a bit ridiculous.
I'd hope your home owner's insurance would rebuild your house for you. Getting hit by a tornado isn't a hobby I was aware of. Usually people with hobbies have a desire to be knowledgeable about their hobby. Didn't mean to cut so close to bone, tuning isn't that hard.
 

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iSPOOL
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I'd hope your home owner's insurance would rebuild your house for you. Getting hit by a tornado isn't a hobby I was aware of. Usually people with hobbies have a desire to be knowledgeable about their hobby. Didn't mean to cut so close to bone, tuning isn't that hard.
There's plenty of people who build, repair, and improve their own houses then there's others who have professionals handle it. The point is you can't ever be well versed in everything.
No one said it was hard, I have the ability to choose what I'm comfortable doing. There's nothing that says the OP can tune which is why I gave my advice to a beginner.
 

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From the land down under
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I'd hope your home owner's insurance would rebuild your house for you. Getting hit by a tornado isn't a hobby I was aware of. Usually people with hobbies have a desire to be knowledgeable about their hobby. Didn't mean to cut so close to bone, tuning isn't that hard.
That might be the case for you, and if it is, then I commend you, but as Shady 2jz already alluded to, nobody is an expert at everything in life, and if paying an accomplished and respected tuner to have his hands on the laptop means that youre guaranteed of a solid and safe result, then that is why most people tend to go down that path.

Just the same as how most people pay for somebody else to port their head, or panel/paint their cars. Youre going to get a better job by paying somebody who does it day in day out.

And for the record, I agree with you about people with hobbies having a desire to be knowledgeable about their hobbys, but I can almost guarantee you that the chances of somebody on this forum having done 100% of the work on their build is remote. Even if we are just talking about installing an alarm, or wiring in an ECU etc.
 

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That might be the case for you, and if it is, then I commend you, but as Shady 2jz already alluded to, nobody is an expert at everything in life, and if paying an accomplished and respected tuner to have his hands on the laptop means that youre guaranteed of a solid and safe result, then that is why most people tend to go down that path.

Just the same as how most people pay for somebody else to port their head, or panel/paint their cars. Youre going to get a better job by paying somebody who does it day in day out.

And for the record, I agree with you about people with hobbies having a desire to be knowledgeable about their hobbys, but I can almost guarantee you that the chances of somebody on this forum having done 100% of the work on their build is remote. Even if we are just talking about installing an alarm, or wiring in an ECU etc.
I know a couple people out there who do everything themselves on their builds. While the results tend to be nice in the end, and reflect the passion and dedication to the car, holy crap time flies. I've seen builds take decades for folks like this... goes back to the old saying:

Fast. Cheap. Correct.

Pick any two.

I've tinkered with my tune a bit, after getting the meat of it done by a professional (in all of a few hours, at that... rather than a few months if I were trying to do it all myself), and in some ways I've improved the little things. I still have a LONG way to go before I'd feel comfortable tuning a car from scratch though.
 

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handy with the steel
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There are a LOT of things that you need to understand before attempting to tune a vehicle yourself. It's certainly more complex than "learning how to use a wideband and a laptop".

Getting AFR and timing correct (with good driveability and stable idle) takes a fair bit of knowledge even when everything is working as it should. The moment you have to start troubleshooting, the required expertice increases exponentially. There is no shame in handing this off to someone who knows what they're doing.
 

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I'd like to add that while it is admirable and something I wholeheartedly recommend, to learn new skills in regards to your project's needs, sometimes... sometimes it is truly best to know where your limits are at this moment in time. Is it worth putting your project on hold for months, or even years, while you develop the skills or save up for the tooling to do a particular job?

Or... does it make more sense to search out quality work from someone who does this particular aspect of your build every day, as their bread and butter?

In my case, my car was in a lot of ways, more fun before I started tinkering with it on a major level, because it all just WORKED. Granted, the car now is a hoot to drive, and is sharper than ever, but it has taken a long, long, long time to get it there. Also when things have gone wrong, they've really went wrong, and by that I mean that the proper fixes have been expensive, to the point that I've begun to question my own dedication and understand why people part cars out.

Too long, don't want to read? TLDR as the kids say: Know the financial / time difference and value between your work and a professional's.
 

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I can almost guarantee you that the chances of somebody on this forum having done 100% of the work on their build is remote. Even if we are just talking about installing an alarm, or wiring in an ECU etc.
I do all my own work..... on everything.... period. I wasn't born that way, I had a desire to not let other people do monkey shit to my cars. Paying a tuner is not a 100% guarantee that you will get anything like the last guy that had good results from that tuner. In fact, there are SO many variables involved that even the tuner will have you sign papers before hand basically saying they they guarantee NOTHING.

You should have control over your hobby.... but I know people that let the bicycle shop do their brakes for them too, so I suppose it is whatever your comfort level is with trusting strangers or sales people. At the end of the day, the tuning shop is a sales role.... even if the customers come to you because of your name. Your car running right or blowing up won't change the color on their TV at home, I promise you that.
 

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There is no shame in handing this off to someone who knows what they're doing.
And that is why some of us get paid the big bucks.... you don't desire to be an expert with what you're messing with, that's fine.... I'd be delighted to take your money for doing something that will take likely less than 30 minutes to fix but some people all week to pay for.
 

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I'd like to add that while it is admirable and something I wholeheartedly recommend, to learn new skills in regards to your project's needs, sometimes... sometimes it is truly best to know where your limits are at this moment in time. Is it worth putting your project on hold for months, or even years, while you develop the skills or save up for the tooling to do a particular job?

Or... does it make more sense to search out quality work from someone who does this particular aspect of your build every day, as their bread and butter?

In my case, my car was in a lot of ways, more fun before I started tinkering with it on a major level, because it all just WORKED. Granted, the car now is a hoot to drive, and is sharper than ever, but it has taken a long, long, long time to get it there. Also when things have gone wrong, they've really went wrong, and by that I mean that the proper fixes have been expensive, to the point that I've begun to question my own dedication and understand why people part cars out.

Too long, don't want to read? TLDR as the kids say: Know the financial / time difference and value between your work and a professional's.
While I do agree with what you're saying for "most people"..... I think the money spent with any shop could be better spent on your own tools to do jobs yourself. Again, nobody is born with knowledge to tune, and tools to change engines.... or paint equipment to do perfect paint jobs.... It's all about your desires I guess, some people desire to pay money to others to do things for them, and that's I guess the benefit of a free economy. There is definitely a space in the market for experts to profit off of those that don't desire to be experts.
 

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iSPOOL
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Not with that attitude.
What attitude is that exactly? The reasonable stance that no singular person is an expert in every topic and some areas are better handled by experts/professionals? There are no universal experts, no matter how much desire or willpower you believe you have.
Like I said, nothing in his 1 post gives us an inkling of his knowledge of the 2jzgte platform, let alone his tuning prowess. We don't even know if he has a GE or GTE, VVTI or Non VVTI.
 
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