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boost life
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I would suggest to reconsider the .68 hotside. Many years back when I started with alpha (induction performance tuner,from 2008) we ran into serious backpressure issues trying to get to 600 on pump gas . Upon alpha suggestion to switch to a .81 and adding mild cams , she did 610 on 93pump gas @only 19psi
 

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From the land down under
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Exactly my sentiments ^

If youre looking for big power on what is effectively 93 octane pump fuel, then a 0.68a/r turbine isnt going to help you get there. As Lexforlife mentioned, you will be wise to put in cams to let the engine breathe better, and have less back pressure.

Julian, what ECU are you going to use, and have you found a tuner yet to discuss your intentions with?

Regarding your engines compression ratio, it is currently 10:1 in factory forum, but you will need to lower it to make it more boost friendly, so you have 3 options in regard to doing that...the first is to just use a TT HG, which lowers it to 9.2:1, or you can keep your factory HG size, but swap in pistons from a TT engine which brings it down to circa 9.1:1. The third option is to put in a far thicker HG and bring your CR down to 8.5:1 which is the compression ratio of a factory TT engine. All 3 options are acceptable, but swapping pistons is the more correct way to go about it, to keep a more ideal squish area in the combustion chamber. There is a great thread in the NA sub forum, by a very clued up forum member "superstock" who goes into all the details around this, and I would suggest that you read it thoroughly in order to get your head around the whys and hows.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Exactly my sentiments ^

If youre looking for big power on what is effectively 93 octane pump fuel, then a 0.68a/r turbine isnt going to help you get there. As Lexforlife mentioned, you will be wise to put in cams to let the engine breathe better, and have less back pressure.

Julian, what ECU are you going to use, and have you found a tuner yet to discuss your intentions with?

Regarding your engines compression ratio, it is currently 10:1 in factory forum, but you will need to lower it to make it more boost friendly, so you have 3 options in regard to doing that...the first is to just use a TT HG, which lowers it to 9.2:1, or you can keep your factory HG size, but swap in pistons from a TT engine which brings it down to circa 9.1:1. The third option is to put in a far thicker HG and bring your CR down to 8.5:1 which is the compression ratio of a factory TT engine. All 3 options are acceptable, but swapping pistons is the more correct way to go about it, to keep a more ideal squish area in the combustion chamber. There is a great thread in the NA sub forum, by a very clued up forum member "superstock" who goes into all the details around this, and I would suggest that you read it thoroughly in order to get your head around the whys and hows.
Thankyou all for the inputs. It has hlped alot. I was going to get the GTE HG, but if you insist that swapping the pistons is a better and safer option is to swap the pistons, i probably will do that. I want to have the least amount of problems prior to the turbo conversion and do it right the first time. I have found a workshop who have worked on many, many supras and have messaged them on facebook, but i have not gone in yet. Thankyou again for mentioning the mild cam upgrade, i will definitely consider and if it necessary (which it sound as if it is) I will do that as well. I will check out superstocks posts too. :)
 

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Use treastone is300 turbo manifold and to make 700hp u can not do it on pump fuel unless it race gasoline. 100 octane rating.. this manifold will clear everything distributor and all. Use precision sp frame turbos
 

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From the land down under
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Dont get me wrong, the TT HG is by far the cheapest, easiest, and completely acceptable route to take.

I just said that using TT pistons would be the most optimal way to do things, if money and time are not a limiting factor.

There are COUNTLESS members on here, myself included, who just went with the TT HG, and it works fine :)

Look into a larger a/r turbine housing before cams, as again, its the easier cheaper option
 

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Someone briefly mentioned it earlier, but I'll emphasise again that it's beneficial to get rid of the distributor ignition system and convert the car to run on coil packs instead. I have found that the stock distributor setup starts to run out of spark at around 1.0-1.3bar. And that's if the components are healthy.

You can retain the distributor housing for cam and crank signal if you want or remove that as well and install a TT oil pump, TT crank trigger wheel and sensor and then mount a cam sensor to the head somewhere for a cleaner look as well as a much more accurate/reliable reading. Doing this conversion will also open your options to TT cam upgrades. If you keep the distributor, you'll have to use GE cams and I don't think there are many aftermarket options available at all
 

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i recorded mark7m001.mp3
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I believe this means having a returnless fuel rail, where the fuel pressure regulator is before the rail.

though on the non-vvti GE it’s not like this, it’s conventional with a single feed and the regulator after the rail. that’s how mine and many others is setup. works just fine as an NA-T.

246105
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Someone briefly mentioned it earlier, but I'll emphasise again that it's beneficial to get rid of the distributor ignition system and convert the car to run on coil packs instead. I have found that the stock distributor setup starts to run out of spark at around 1.0-1.3bar. And that's if the components are healthy.

You can retain the distributor housing for cam and crank signal if you want or remove that as well and install a TT oil pump, TT crank trigger wheel and sensor and then mount a cam sensor to the head somewhere for a cleaner look as well as a much more accurate/reliable reading. Doing this conversion will also open your options to TT cam upgrades. If you keep the distributor, you'll have to use GE cams and I don't think there are many aftermarket options available at all
After reading this, i have read into ignition systems briefly to understand which is better and why. I will most likely convert to run on coil packs. How much did this cost for you if you have done this or how much will it cost? Thankyou
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Dont get me wrong, the TT HG is by far the cheapest, easiest, and completely acceptable route to take.

I just said that using TT pistons would be the most optimal way to do things, if money and time are not a limiting factor.

There are COUNTLESS members on here, myself included, who just went with the TT HG, and it works fine :)

Look into a larger a/r turbine housing before cams, as again, its the easier cheaper option
How long have you had your car turbo'd? Whats gone wrong/ what have you regretted not doing initially?
 

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After reading this, i have read into ignition systems briefly to understand which is better and why. I will most likely convert to run on coil packs. How much did this cost for you if you have done this or how much will it cost? Thankyou
You can convert to wasted spark coils and igniter from the vvti engines for circa $300 if you hunt around, Whatever you do, dont buy cheap chinese clone coils, like supersparks etc....just because theyre bright red or yellow doesnt mean they work

How long have you had your car turbo'd? Whats gone wrong/ what have you regretted not doing initially?
Since 2008. Very little has gone wrong tbh, but thats because it was well planned before hand, and no corners were really cut. Ive had a couple of small cracks in my manifold, which needed welding, but that isnt uncommon for even expensive manifolds...its just part of the game. One of the most important things is to make sure you protect everything from the radiant heat adequately.

My only small regret I guess was not going with a quality turbo in the beginning, but that isnt for any real reason, as my chinese turbo is still going now, 11 years and 25000km later. Which reminds me...I really should install my PTE 6266 lol
 

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Discussion Starter #34
You can convert to wasted spark coils and igniter from the vvti engines for circa $300 if you hunt around, Whatever you do, dont buy cheap chinese clone coils, like supersparks etc....just because theyre bright red or yellow doesnt mean they work



Since 2008. Very little has gone wrong tbh, but thats because it was well planned before hand, and no corners were really cut. Ive had a couple of small cracks in my manifold, which needed welding, but that isnt uncommon for even expensive manifolds...its just part of the game. One of the most important things is to make sure you protect everything from the radiant heat adequately.

My only small regret I guess was not going with a quality turbo in the beginning, but that isnt for any real reason, as my chinese turbo is still going now, 11 years and 25000km later. Which reminds me...I really should install my PTE 6266 lol
One more question, Did it end up being cheaper than getting a turbo supra from the start (Talkin about costs of turbo supras now, not back in 08)?
 

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i recorded mark7m001.mp3
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One more question, Did it end up being cheaper than getting a turbo supra from the start (Talkin about costs of turbo supras now, not back in 08)?
it’s such a loaded question that it’s difficult to answer. if you want to make 400hp, it can be less expensive than starting with a TT supra since some components that are on an NA supra won’t hold you back. if you want to make 600+ it’s a little bit of a different story. things like having a capable fuel system, strong ignition system, standalone ecu, strong enough transmission, are all needed.

estimating cost for you can be all over the place. will you be doing all of the install and fabrication ?
 

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The answer to that question is different in every country, as values between NA and TT cars arent globally linear, but I know that when I bought my NA with the plans to NA-T it, a big reason for that decision was that finding a TT in NZ in a pre GFC 2006/7 was all but impossible, and they were selling for $15 to 20k more than the NA version, so it was the best decision for me at the time. .
 

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I believe this means having a returnless fuel rail, where the fuel pressure regulator is before the rail.

though on the non-vvti GE it’s not like this, it’s conventional with a single feed and the regulator after the rail. that’s how mine and many others is setup. works just fine as an NA-T.

View attachment 246105
That looks like a return line has been mounted where the stock fuel pulse dampener was. I wouldn't get rid of that device. I'm probably wrong about that though given that you said it's not VVTI and I have no experience with non VVTI engines/setups. My IS300 had an OEM fuel pressure regulator in the pump hanger. Where you have your return line is a fuel pulse dampener on the VVTI's deadhead fueling system.

I have ID1050x's in my rail without a return line from the rail.
 

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From the land down under
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That looks like a return line has been mounted where the stock fuel pulse dampener was. I wouldn't get rid of that device. I'm probably wrong about that though given that you said it's not VVTI and I have no experience with non VVTI engines/setups. My IS300 had an OEM fuel pressure regulator in the pump hanger. Where you have your return line is a fuel pulse dampener on the VVTI's deadhead fueling system.

I have ID1050x's in my rail without a return line from the rail.
The fuel pulse dampener is on the line that leads to the other end of the rail on non vvti engines.

The item that is missing in the photo is the factory FPR.
 

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i recorded mark7m001.mp3
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The fuel pulse dampener is on the line that leads to the other end of the rail on non vvti engines.

The item that is missing in the photo is the factory FPR.
yeah, my setup has an adapter where the oem FPR was, leading to my Aeromotive FPR. stock fuel pulsation dampener is still on the other end of the rail like stock.

246326
 
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